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Old 09-08-2007, 12:10 AM   #41
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Being an indian i love the Indian food the most. I boast about it :-)
Well, you can try Tandoori murgh, Chicken Biryani, (almost all chicken dishes are awesome !! believe me! ) Pasinde(its a meat curry), Naan, Chicken Khorma, Chicken Tikka, Murgh kababs, ... Ah the list is endless !!
You can check out Indian recipe at my blog Zaiqa..
See ya.
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Old 09-09-2007, 11:02 AM   #42
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I said influenced, not the "same as". I've become very lazy when it comes to Indian cuisine. I used to try to do it all myself. But it became ridiculous. I still do it on occaision, but my Indian friend brings me prepard dishes that are wonderful. I believe it is "Kitchens of India", and also anything by Pataks. I do love to do Thai curries in the summer because I have a wonderful herb garden, and all of the Thai women I know use a lot of the herbs. Yes, it is a totally different flavor, but there is (to me) an influence. By the way, does anyone out there have a source for a kaffir lime, or lemongrass plants? I used to grow them in Florida and Hawaii. Here it would have to be a house plant, but I'd still like to try it. I substitute lemon and lime juice and rind, which comes close, but I'd like the trees/grass in a pot. Even if it fails, it might be fun to try.
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Old 09-09-2007, 02:00 PM   #43
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Love Indian food and have been cooking it since I was 18. I hve been to India 30+ times in the last 20 years. Love all the cuisines of India-love hot and spicy.

Shanti, VP Community
ifood.tv | Food Video Recipe Community
one of the best Indian recipe sites-free
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:14 PM   #44
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Maria promised tandoori chicken recipe today!

Quote:
Originally Posted by maria View Post
Being an indian i love the Indian food the most. I boast about it :-)
Well, you can try Tandoori murgh, Chicken Biryani, (almost all chicken dishes are awesome !! believe me! ) Pasinde(its a meat curry), Naan, Chicken Khorma, Chicken Tikka, Murgh kababs, ... Ah the list is endless !!
You can check out Indian recipe at my blog Zaiqa..
See ya.
Maria had a Tandoori recipe on her site today just as promised - beautiful job. Thank you Maria, and thank you for the kind words. I will give you a full report one of these days. Thanks also for the link - how did you do that? Your camera - I need to take some food pictures for Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans and don't even have a camera - what do you use? Would a small K Mart special work? D
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Old 09-10-2007, 09:40 PM   #45
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Try the samosas Indian dumplings filled with curried potatoes and english peas.. that is only one version of thousands of samosa's. I had these in Orange county some years ago and they are delish..
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Old 09-10-2007, 11:56 PM   #46
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Ate at a new and terrific Indian restaurant today in Pleasant Hill, CA. I had a Tifin lunch and it was yummy. I am so excited as they also do Pomfret Tandoor (whole) and paj Bahji!

We'll be going for dinner soon for sure.

There used to be a place in NYC that did Tandoor Pomfret, but I do not know of any place in CA that does it. Now in Dlhi, I love the Tandoor Pomfret at the restaurant downstairs at the Oberoi.

Can't wait to try it at this place Masala Monsoon.
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Old 09-11-2007, 07:33 AM   #47
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The first time I ate Indian food was in Hong Kong. My husband and I were wandering down the alleys and byways, and found this little restaurant in the basement of one of the buildings. Since we had no experience, we simply told the waiter to feed us whatever he thought best. I distinctly remember samosas, black pepper pappadams, another flat bread, and numerous curries. We loved it so much that when we found a police cordon around the restaurant we'd planned for the next night, we went back for more Indian instead (and this time we knew what to order). When we got back home (then Hawaii), a freind of ours had a new (Indian) sister-in-law, and was learning to cook from her. Since then we've often cooked it, although, as I said, we mostly eat prepared since there are only two of us, and only so much room in the spice cabinets (yes, plural. I have so many spices it is ridiculous).

I cannot recommend more highly going to an Indian buffet. There is very little food I like on a buffet line, but this allows you to try a number of dishes without commiting to one. Some I've been to actually have a vegetarian line and a meat-eaters line, always all-you-can-eat. It makes it so that you can have a dab of this and that. One in Victorville, California was especially great because we'd sit down and Mr. Singh (yes, I do know that was his name and what it symbolizes) would bring out a plate of tandoori chicken, fresh off the grill to your table. The curries, breads, salads etc were on the buffet line. I've been to similar places in Charleston, Alexandria, Madison, etc. We don't have an Indian restaurant near us, so we count on my own abilities, Kitchens of India, Patak's, our Pakistani friend's friends. I think another good Indian moment was when we were sitting at his pied a terre apartment to meet a friend of his. The man said he wanted to cook for us, but where could he get spices. I laughingly told him that I'd take him. There is a bulk spice merchant right across the street. He and I had a blast shopping for the spices, and the next day he cooked for us. Beats anything I could do.
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Old 09-11-2007, 01:12 PM   #48
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Indian dessert. I love their mango shakes. I totally recommend their mango lassi if you get the chance. Also look for their rice pudding with a hint of pistachio and almonds. Lovely stuff. Yummy!!

If you ever get the chance to come to Vancouver, head down to Samosa Garden on Kingsway for a chance to try all-you-can-eat-Indian buffet. You'll get a chance to try everything there. Samosa Garden Restauerant
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:41 PM   #49
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Hi Shanti - It's paav Bhaaji and I agree it's good.

BTW: Making a tandoori pomfret is very easy. I use tilapia because I can find it fresh and it comes out just as good as the pomfret. If you would like to try at home let me know and I will give you the recipe.

It is a basic tandoori marinade.
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Old 09-13-2007, 12:00 AM   #50
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I don't like talapia as it is very bland compared to Indian Pomfret. Wow you have a Tandoor? You are very lucky. The only place I know that does tandoor pomfret is Monsoon masala in Pleasant Hill, CA. Of course in Delhi it is easy to find.

I am amazed you have a Tandoor, what size is it? Only restaurants here have them even my many Indian friends don't have them.

Pav Bhaji is how it is spelled in India. Here is a wonderful video of the best Pav Bhaji in the world right in Mumbai.

"Pav Bhaji" at Juhu Beach video | ifood.tv
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:15 AM   #51
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Hi Shanti, I don't have a tandoor but you can make a very close replica of it in the oven or the grill.

And as far as tandoor's go you can buy them in most major cities in US. They have Indian restaurant supply stores and you can look them up. I know Houston has a lot of them for example that will ship you a tandoor if you like. They have the portable kinds.

Also pav bhaji is how it's spelled but the correct pronunciation when you speak is Paav (long A sound) and Bhaaji (Again long A sound) which translates literally into bread and dry curry and yes I was born in Mumbai and grew up there so I know many places there that make a mean one. It's relatively easy to make it at home as well.
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Old 09-14-2007, 11:44 PM   #52
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Do you make the Portugese bread they serve with Pav Bhaji?

I know I can get a Tandoor but they are over $1000. I do a great Tandoori chicken on the smoker. The taste is amazing. It's just that Tandoor-real tandoor Indian Pomfret is amazing. Well you know. The way the heat instantly sears the outside and every drop of moisture is sealed inside. You eat the fins, tail, most of the head, oh my it is amazing!

Do you make breadfruit curry like they make in Kerela? I'd love a recipe for that. It is so tasty. We often make idli and sambhar as a lunch, but in India it is my favourite breakfast. Vada is OK. I do also love a Masala Dosa and we have many restaurants here that make thm. There are more Indians here than pobably anywhere outside India so we have so many great spots.

Do you return to India often? I am missing it so much. I normally am there 5 or 6 times a year but not now.
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Old 09-15-2007, 01:01 AM   #53
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I'm an Indian

But it is almost impossible for anyone to know all Indian dishes or recipes because the diversity in Indian culture, food habits, climates and vegetation is huge.
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Old 09-15-2007, 07:40 PM   #54
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It's true... I come from Malaysia where there are Indians and I'll bet you anything their curries are much different from the mainland.

I love curries though! Whatever the choice, spicier the better! Hmmm! Hungry already!!!!
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Old 09-16-2007, 12:12 AM   #55
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So true, not only does every dish vary by region but every cook as everywhere in the world will be different. That is the delight of cooking it is always an evolution and if it weren't it would be boring. Depending on our moods, the ingredients which deped on the weather and terrior it will be different, but that is wonderful!

Desi food is often the best!
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Old 09-16-2007, 07:07 AM   #56
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Most of the food you are getting in the restaurant s out of India has the influence from the out side world starting from the Alexander the great. Each invasion brought different cuisines and taste to India. The real Indian food is very much different. The taste and texture varies from state to state, creed to creed. Most of the north Indian food goes along well with bread products like naan or even pizza base. South Indian foods are good with rice and rice cakes. The balancing of the food is very much important in the Indian cuisine due to the heavy y usage of spices. I f you are eating north Indian you can have one glass of buttermilk or lassi. It is rasam for south India.
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Old 09-17-2007, 02:41 PM   #57
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Obe of my favouites is the old Awadhi recipes. I make several of these. They take an entire day and can often contain a total of 4 or 5 masalas totaling 30+ spices. Obne

Some very difficult to find. For instance Lazzat-e-Taam contains 25 spices/ingredients and it is just the finishing for Kundan Kaliya.

Some ingredients for the Lazzat-e-Taam (Avadhi garam masala) are Mitha ittr, baobeer, makhana, and jarakush not so readily available.
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Old 09-17-2007, 11:17 PM   #58
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My most favourite dish is plain rice with chicken curry & tomato chutney.
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Old 09-19-2007, 04:53 AM   #59
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Some ingredients for the Lazzat-e-Taam (Avadhi garam masala) are Mitha ittr, baobeer, makhana, and jarakush not so readily available.
Where do u buy them, Shantihhh?
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Old 09-19-2007, 06:25 PM   #60
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Mel - Baobeer and Jarakhus are not so commonly found. You get them in ayurvedic stores. Jarakhus is the root of the poppy seed plant.

Makhana - Are easily available in Indian stores. They are white puffy and look like popcorn and are pretty tasteless. They are lotus seeds that are popped just like corn kernels

Mitha Ittr - Also available in Indian stores. You can ask for Kewra essence. Kewra is a very aromatic flower that grows in the tropics. The essence of that flower is called Mitha Ittr

Out of all the ingredients in the list the only one that makes a difference to your palate is kewra. I normally add it to the biryani I make (it's like a Spanish version of Paella). It adds a depth of flavor that is very authentic in moghulai cuisine.

As far as the other ingredients go they are common to the Awadhi or Dum Pukht cuisine that was popular during the Moghul rule. It is not authentic to all Indian cuisine and I would bet that most palates are not that refined (even me being Indian) to differentiate the couple of these ingredients from others.

Makhana is normally used in sweet preparations.
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