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Old 03-31-2012, 04:41 PM   #21
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I can use chicken thighs with good results, yes?
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Old 03-31-2012, 07:06 PM   #22
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I can use chicken thighs with good results, yes?
Sure you can! Use skinless bone-in chicken thighs. I cook Chicken Marsala that way too. Roll them in seasoned flour and brown them in vegetable oil.

Working from the OP (although my own recipe is different) you'll have to increase the cooking time because the original cooking time for the chicken is time of browning plus 10 minutes after the chicken is returned to the pan, not enough to cook whole thighs thoroughly.

Instead, just leave the chicken pieces in the pan and add your additional ingredients, cover and reduce the heat, simmer on low for about 30-40 minutes to completely cook the whole pieces. Turn the pieces a few times as necessary to cook evenly, add more wine if the liquid level gets low. Check at 30 minutes and continue simmering up to 10 minutes more, or until they're done.

I tend to use more wine than the recipe in the OP, then finish by keeping the chicken warm in the oven while I reduce the sauce to suit.


ETA: Or if you're using skinless boneless chicken thighs then handle them the same as skinless boneless chicken breasts.
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Old 03-31-2012, 08:04 PM   #23
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Thanks Greg. I seldom use chicken breast at all, as I think thighs have so much more flavor.
Thanks to a tip from Andy some time ago, I learned that cooking them longer than "just done" as I had been doing, gives a better texture to the meat.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:29 PM   #24
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Yes, I know this is old thread, but that was the whole point of reviving it, because the recipe is so simple and so good.
GG, sorry, but I totally missed your joke.
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Old 04-01-2012, 12:20 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Thanks Greg. I seldom use chicken breast at all, as I think thighs have so much more flavor.
Thanks to a tip from Andy some time ago, I learned that cooking them longer than "just done" as I had been doing, gives a better texture to the meat.
I think it's a general cooking concept that bone-in meat always tastes better than boneless fillets, and that meat near the bone always tastes better than meat less near the bone. I'm not sure why that is so but I'm certain it's true.

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Yes, I know this is old thread, but that was the whole point of reviving it, because the recipe is so simple and so good.
GG, sorry, but I totally missed your joke.
Sorry Charlie. I often don't understand my own jokes, or sometimes make jokes unintentionally without understanding that other people perceive them as jokes, or even make jokes and not have them perceived as so.

This is all so much easier face to face when we can perceive other peoples' facial expressions and body language, yet even there we often missperceive jokes as seriousness, or vice versa.

My advice to everybody is to perceive everything I say in a humorous context unless it's presented in a schema of ingredients/method.
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Old 04-01-2012, 06:49 AM   #26
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Good Morning Everyone,

Firstly, Chicken or Veal Marsala hails from Sicilia and is a festive dish in the Port of Marsala ... once called Marshalla, in Arabic.

As I had mentioned on the Greek Salad thread, I like my Mediterranean dishes, traditional ... and I do not deviate ... How can I take a recipe that hails from the 1770s and make it better ? I am not Ferrán Adría and even he could not !!! And he would not try ! He would prefer to fly over to Marsala !!!

I like to have Veal Marsala when I am in Italia, because Spain does not have a veal culture ... and so I prepare with chicken in Spain, and veal when in Italia ...

The ingredients are:

Butter
Marsala wine which is produced in Sicilia
salt & black pepper
flour for dredging
chicken or veal cutlets
olive oil EVOO

Lovely post.
Grazie.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:27 PM   #27
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Carnivore--

If you can't find Marsala, you can substitute Cream Sherry OR Tawny Port. It won't be exactly the same but will be fairly close. Also, when I first learned to make Chicken Marsala, I was taught to add about half a cup of seedless red grapes to simmer in the sauce with the mushrooms. Give it a try--it's good! (But might not be 100% "authentic.")
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Old 02-08-2013, 01:33 AM   #28
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Carnivore--

If you can't find Marsala, you can substitute Cream Sherry OR Tawny Port. It won't be exactly the same but will be fairly close. Also, when I first learned to make Chicken Marsala, I was taught to add about half a cup of seedless red grapes to simmer in the sauce with the mushrooms. Give it a try--it's good! (But might not be 100% "authentic.")
Welcome to DC reasvey. I've used the recipe as written several times and I don't think you can have Chicken Marsala without Marsala. Sherry or Port isn't Chicken Marsala.
Red grapes sounds like a nice addition, but Marsala is a must. It's a really wonderful and simple recipe!
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:23 PM   #29
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Ooh I was recently looking at a similar Martha Stewart recipe as I love Marsala too .

However when I first saw the post I thought it meant chicken masala as to was under "ethnic" why is this an ethnic recipe ?
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:41 PM   #30
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Because it is not American. Though what is American nowadays. In all honesty it is Italian recipe and thus is ethnic.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:31 PM   #31
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Kitchenelf, you might say older than dirt I'm a grandma in her 60's :) Back to basics is a nice change... I still love garlic mashed potatoes, but the egg noodles sound so good...I'm planning sunday dinner around your recipe...Always have all my kids here on sundays and they take turns requesting dinner...This Sunday it's my turn... Thanks again.
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Old 02-09-2013, 03:51 AM   #32
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Thanks Charlie, so that would be my other question, what dishes are American, I thought a lot of your dishes would be a mix of cultures as are indeed, many dishes in many countries . So what is considered purely American ?
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Old 02-09-2013, 05:57 AM   #33
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Thanks Charlie, so that would be my other question, what dishes are American, I thought a lot of your dishes would be a mix of cultures as are indeed, many dishes in many countries . So what is considered purely American ?
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ood-74008.html
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Old 02-09-2013, 08:23 AM   #34
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Ah thank you Pac . A lot there originating then from other countries .
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:37 AM   #35
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Ah thank you Pac . A lot there originating then from other countries .
It's that whole "melting pot" thing
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Old 02-09-2020, 04:07 PM   #36
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Love this recipe. Making it right now.
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Old 02-09-2020, 04:44 PM   #37
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I realize this thread goes back beyond when I joined the forum in September of 2004. Reading through it I'm surprised I didn't respond ate some point.

Personally, I would only use dry Marsala. I've used both and the difference is significant. I believe it's the most authentic and I don't like sweetness in savory dishes. In her cookbook Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, a recognized authority on Italian foods, Marcella Hazan uses dry marsala.

It's chicken MARSALA for crying out loud, so NO you should not use some other wine. But you are certainly free to do so. Just change the name of the recipe.

In addition to making the classic recipe, I have also finished the recipe with some heavy cream to enrich and thicken the sauce.
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Old 02-10-2020, 01:52 PM   #38
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I usually avoid "authentic" issues like a bad corona virus, however....

made this many times. don't give a hoot if it's "authentic" or not - it's a really good version of Chicken Marsala.

Ingredients
1-1/2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, each breast cut crosswise into 3 pieces
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
5 tablespoons butter, divided
3/4 cup chopped onion
1 pound cremini mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 cup dry Marsala wine
1 cup mascarpone cheese
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves, plus whole sprigs, for garnish
12 ounces dried fettuccine

Directions
Sprinkle the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a heavy large skillet over high heat. Add the chicken and cook just until brown, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer the chicken to a plate and cool slightly.
While the chicken cools, melt 2 tablespoons of butter to the same skillet over medium-high heat, then add the onion and saute until tender, about 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and garlic and saute until the mushrooms are tender and the juices evaporate, about 12 minutes.

Add the wine and simmer until it is reduced by half, about 4 minutes. Stir in the mascarpone and mustard.
Cut the chicken breasts crosswise into 1/3-inch-thick slices. Return the chicken and any accumulated juices to the skillet. Simmer, uncovered, over medium-low heat until the chicken is just cooked through and the sauce thickens slightly, about 2 minutes. Stir in the chopped parsley. Season the sauce, to taste, with salt and pepper.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the fettuccine and cook until al dente, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Drain. Toss the fettuccine with 3 tablespoons of butter and season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Swirl the fettuccine onto serving plates. Spoon the chicken mixture over top. Garnish with parsley sprigs and serve.

Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis
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Old 02-10-2020, 02:05 PM   #39
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Giada's recipes are usually pretty good.
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Old 02-10-2020, 02:12 PM   #40
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Giada's recipes are usually pretty good.
+1...
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