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Old 05-26-2006, 06:49 AM   #1
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How do you use Wasabi?

I looked this up on Wikipedia before bothering you all...

What is the most common way of using this condiment?
Is it used on its own, or mostly blended with soy sauce?
It is best bought as a paste, or reconstituted from powder?

I'm a fan of Chinese and Thai rather than Japanese food.
How would you suggest its use for these cuisines?

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Alex R.

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Old 05-26-2006, 07:09 AM   #2
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Quote:
What is the most common way of using this condiment?
Very, very carefully :). Mostly it is used as a condiment to accompany various kinds of seafood, or it is included in the dish (such as the small amount of wasabi between the rice and topping in nigirisushi). You could also try making a wasabi mayonnaise that has become quite a popular choice in various restaraunts (at least where I am) to accompany seafood dishes.

What luck, I just spotted a recipe posted by Iron Chef for a Soy and Wasabi Aioli that might interest you.

Quote:
Is it used on its own, or mostly blended with soy sauce?
Generally you do not mix it with soy sauce prior to serving, but put the soy and wasabi into two small seperate bowls.

Quote:
It is best bought as a paste, or reconstituted from powder?
I would buy it as a paste, more convenient.

Quote:
I'm a fan of Chinese and Thai rather than Japanese food.
How would you suggest its use for these cuisines?
I am unsure if you could incorporate it into Chinese-style dishes successfully. I definitely would not recommend trying to incorporate it into Thai dishes, I feel the flavour would not fit in whatsoever. I would leave wasabi to Japanese and Japanese-fusion dishes.
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Old 05-26-2006, 07:37 AM   #3
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I agree that the paste is easier to use, but the powder is fine too (and what I have in my cupboard).

Have you tasted wasabi yet? It is very powerful and has a unique taste. Give it a taste (carefully) and then go from there an experiment.
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Old 05-26-2006, 07:39 AM   #4
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the best thing about wasabi is that it hits hard, but then it is gone, it is not like a pepper at all
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:48 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggis
Generally you do not mix it with soy sauce prior to serving, but put the soy and wasabi into two small seperate bowls.
.
Whenever I go for sushi, I always put a dab of wasabi into the dish with the shoyu. (soy sauce) It's a must for me.
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:52 AM   #6
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A lot of people do do that grumblebee. If you ask the sushi etiquite people they will tell you that it is a huge no no to do that, but personaly I do not think there should be any rules other than if you enjoy it then you should do it!
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:26 AM   #7
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snort it!!!

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Old 05-26-2006, 10:30 AM   #8
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I agree with others and would not use Wasabi in Thai and Chinese dishes. There are many other ingredients that are authentic to that style of cooking and wasabi is not one of them.

If you have a lot of wasabi make yourself sushi or aioli as others suggested. I like to mix wasabi paste with some soy sauce and sesame oil and use that as my dip for sushi. I am not a big fan of raw sushi so it's mostly maki for me.

That thing is potent for sure. It immediately hits you and opens up your sinuses but as Charlie says it does not linger around.
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Old 05-26-2006, 11:01 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by GB
A lot of people do do that grumblebee. If you ask the sushi etiquite people they will tell you that it is a huge no no to do that,
Really? I always thought that was what was traditionally done! LOL. Shows what I know.

Here I am thinking I'm somewhat of a sushi connoisseur but I'm really just your average heathen!
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Old 05-26-2006, 11:19 AM   #10
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Yeah I was surprised to find out some of the sushi etiquite rules. Here are a few more...

When dipping the sushi in soy sauce it should be the fish that goes in the sauce, not the rice.

The fish should always touch your tongue first, not the rice.

Only pour a very little bit of soy sauce into the dish and add more as needed. Leaving a puddle of soy sauce leftover in the dish is considered wasteful and rude.

There are many other rules, but again the only rule I follow is do what you enjoy
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Old 05-26-2006, 03:53 PM   #11
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For Chinese food, you can use a wasabi/soy mixture as a dipping sauce for dim sum. But then you would only do that at home, since you won't find wasabi at a Chinese restaurant anyway.
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Old 05-26-2006, 03:53 PM   #12
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I agree with "Sparingly" or "Carefully". Real Wasabi will make the top of your scalp burn and your sinuses burn if over used. I love wasabi and generally only eat it with sushi but the first time I ever had wasabi was at a fancy wedding in Central Kentucky. I ran a shrimp through it not knowing what it was and tossed it in my mouth. I thought my skin would peel off my head.

The only time I have experienced such a burn, luckily as an observer, was at Keeneland race track in Lexington. We where in the club house and my buddy Ken filled a small bowl with fresh grated horse radish thinking it was cole slaw. If you can even imagine eating a fork full of horse radish radish you get the idea.

I read an article a couple of months ago that most wasabi in the US until recently was not real wasabi at all but horse radish paste or powder that was colored green. Either way use discretion.
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Old 05-26-2006, 04:07 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by bknox
I read an article a couple of months ago that most wasabi in the US until recently was not real wasabi at all but horse radish paste or powder that was colored green. Either way use discretion.
That is correct. Real wasabi is considerably more expensive, perishable, and generally unavailable except in certain parts of the US.
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Old 05-26-2006, 04:40 PM   #14
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Love wasabi, or whatever passes for it.

Cannot discuss sushi because whenever we get to a Japanese restaurant always order the sashimi.

A tad of wasabi with the fish and I am in heaven.

But was wondering, a would a small amount of wasabi powder in guacamole work?

Just a tad.

Or maybe in sour cream for a dip with some other ingredients?

Gotta work on that.
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bknox
I read an article a couple of months ago that most wasabi in the US until recently was not real wasabi at all but horse radish paste or powder that was colored green. Either way use discretion.
Funny you should say that because I was going to suggest to AlexR to try a sandwich with smoked turkey and smoked ham, and use it as you would say a horseradish sauce, along with whatever toppings on the sandwich. I have a jar of powdered wasabi. It looks white-ish, but when mixed with water it turns green. The ingredients of this powder version are:

powdered horseradish
mustard
Artificial coloring, yellow #5 (that would be why it turns green with water)

AlexR, the only time I have used wasabi (other than yesterday in a sauce for fish courtesy of Ironchef) was on a sushi, and just used a dab because it can be quite hot! Thought the hot doesnt last too long.
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:06 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by ironchef
That is correct. Real wasabi is considerably more expensive, perishable, and generally unavailable except in certain parts of the US.
Perishable, meaning the paste version right? I have the powdered version so I assume that would last quite some time correct?
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:10 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by amber
Perishable, meaning the paste version right? I have the powdered version so I assume that would last quite some time correct?
No, meaning the fresh wasabi root that you would grate at home. The pre-made paste lasts awhile too. I usually buy S&B brand and the expiration dates are usually a year or two later from when I purchase it.
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:22 PM   #18
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The not real Wasabi that you get here in the states is only, as noted above horeradish dye and mustard. I keep it around for those times I have left over beef that demands to become a sandwich. The small tubes keep well although I think they have lost most of their flavor in a month or so after opening.

I think I'll try to find some real wasabi this week end and try it, we have a huge asian community in these parts and I'm sure one of the markets will have it.

Real asian markets have so many treats that I've never had that I feel like a kid in a candy store.
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Old 05-29-2006, 06:19 AM   #19
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I didn't actually realise the stuff in the tubes wasn't the real deal until I talked to a japanese friend. Next time I make a trip to the city (no asian grocers nearby) I am going to have a good look around and try to find some.
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Old 05-29-2006, 08:06 AM   #20
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It's a necessity for me with sushi, but I also enjoy it in mashed potatoes & mayonnaise.

One of the best meals I had at a local restaurant was a filet mignon of Kobe beef served on a bed of Wasabi mashed potatoes. And talk about a comfort food culture clash - a favorite sandwich of mine is fish sticks with Wasabi Mayonnaise - lol!!
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