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Old 06-14-2006, 08:02 AM   #1
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Imam Biyaldi

This is a Turkish recipe and is supposed to be called (The Priest swooned!) by this name because the Imam swooned with pleasure when served this dish! Nice story, but I doubt if it is true A very similar dish is claimed as being Greek or Lebanese, too..... Seems like lots of nationalities had the same good idea!


Imam Biyaldi

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Old 06-14-2006, 08:11 AM   #2
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I love Imam Bayaldi.
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Old 06-14-2006, 08:38 AM   #3
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Me too! I always make enough for 3 meals at a time. One hot, one cold and one as a side dish!
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Old 06-14-2006, 09:05 AM   #4
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True, there are so many recipes from the mediterranean area that can be equally Greek, Lebanese, Turkish etc. etc., like Baklava, Hummus, Kabobs etc. etc... they share the very similar climate and the natural environment,
also many cultural infusions from one to the other (despite the notorious feud between Greeks and Turks...) so I guess it is inevitable that you see almost identical recipes from these countries...

This one sounds really delicious... aubergenes are starting to be readily available at very low prices this season, and I am always open to a new variety to prepare one of my favourite summer vegetables, I will surely take note of this recipe...thanks Ishbel!!
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Old 06-14-2006, 09:21 AM   #5
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Hm, I had to look up what the auberrrrrr.......... whatever, actually is. Never heard egg plant called that before. Live and learn.
I have to say though if it was not for cumin seeds that would have been recipe of my grandma, and she definitely had no knowledge of Mediterranean cuisine.
So, let's rename the topic. Because the "imam" made me think of some political topic to be discussed.
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Old 06-14-2006, 09:44 AM   #6
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Charlie - half the world calls it aubergine.... No, I can't rename it, I didn't give the dish its name, the Turkish people did! C'mon be a little broadminded here....
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Old 06-14-2006, 09:53 AM   #7
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The stole it from Russians.
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Old 06-14-2006, 10:05 AM   #8
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Hahahaaa - I don't THINK SO....
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Old 06-14-2006, 10:28 AM   #9
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The recipe I use for Imam Bayaldi is a little different.

Cut four slim aubergines from top to bottom to make eight halves (around 750g/1.5lbs in total). Pat dry and shallow fry in olive oil on the flesh and the skin side. When cooked (they don't need to be fully soft as you'll be baking them in the oven later) place side by side in an ovenproof dish with the cut side facing upwards. If they're slightly squashed up so the aubergine pieces don't lie flat but form a valley between two halves, all the better when it comes to piling in the stuffing.

While the aubergines are frying, make a very onion-rich tomato sauce by sautéing 500g/1lb roughly chopped onions until slightly golden and soft. Add three to four cloves of garlic, crushed or sliced as you prefer (I prefer crushed). Leave to fry a moment longer then add 500g/1lb fresh, very ripe tomatoes or a 396g/14oz can of tomatos and a teaspoon each of oregano and thyme or 2 tsps of herbes de provence and a teaspoon of sugar. If you use fresh tomatoes, you might want to peel them or need to add a little water if they're not very juicy. Cook gently for 15 mins or so.

Pile the sauce onto the aubergines and bake at 350ºF/180ºC for half an hour or so depending on the softness of the aubergines after frying. Baste at least once by drizzling with olive oil or with the sauce itself.
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Old 06-14-2006, 11:28 AM   #10
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One of my favorites. Thank you.
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Old 06-14-2006, 12:11 PM   #11
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Hello pdswife. From the look of the flag you use, you must have what you consider to be an authentically Greek version! How do you cook it?
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Old 06-14-2006, 01:02 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Hahahaaa - I don't THINK SO....
Yeah, right, next you going to tell me that British invented telelvision.
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Old 06-14-2006, 04:26 PM   #13
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No, Charlie.... I wouldn't presume to tell anybody anything anymore....
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Old 06-14-2006, 04:47 PM   #14
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By the way russians also invented first airplane, first engine, first vcr, first radio, and whatever else, can't remember right now
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Old 06-14-2006, 05:34 PM   #15
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Very clever the Russians. They continued for many years to fit valve equipment in their fighter planes (still do, for all I know), not because they were cheap or backwards but because a nuclear blast will take out computers, but valves will keep on going...
Not sure what this has got to do with cooking, but there we go.
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Old 06-14-2006, 05:45 PM   #16
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Hey, Snoop, thank you. You just proved my point, that recipe in question is in fact Russian and the only reason people may think it's Turkish because Turks (or whatever the proper way to call them in English, sorry I simply do not know) stole it from us.

Oh, and BTW I have no idea what you were just talking about.
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Old 06-14-2006, 06:12 PM   #17
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I'm not why it's important to discover who was the first to cook an eggplant. The recipe looks good, though. Thank you, Ishbel for your input.
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Old 06-14-2006, 06:41 PM   #18
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thanks Ishbel,
I've seen this before but have never had the chance to try it. Now that I've 4 eggplants going strong, It will be one of the first things I try. You always give us such wonderful interesting and great sounding recipes. Thank you.
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Old 06-14-2006, 09:57 PM   #19
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Hi CharlieD, I might have proved a point about Russians being very clever, but I'm not sure I proved the recipe for Imam Bayaldi is Russian! It's a great dish, whatever its origins.
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Old 06-14-2006, 10:21 PM   #20
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Indeed it is.
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