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Old 09-26-2006, 06:57 AM   #1
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Indian vegetable Biryani

Indian Vegetable Biryani

Link provided as recipe is copyrighted. Please refrain from posting copyrighted recipes. Please see our Copyright Policies in the Community Forum and Announcements.

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Old 09-26-2006, 06:59 AM   #2
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Welcome to DC, Jazz. Your recipe sounds wonderful, thank you!
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Old 09-26-2006, 06:04 PM   #3
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Jazz

It is nice to meet you and welcome to DC. Your receipe is unique and unusual. Thank you for sharing it with us.
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Old 09-26-2006, 08:07 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shpj4
It is nice to meet you and welcome to DC. Your receipe is unique and unusual. Thank you for sharing it with us.
not unusual to an ex-pat Englishman. That was part of my staple diet in London!
Thank you, jazz!
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Old 09-27-2006, 12:10 AM   #5
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Ooooh lovely. I've been looking for a good biryani recipe... Thanks! For the "fresh, thick, curds" do you mean cubes of paneer or what?

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Old 09-27-2006, 04:12 AM   #6
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Thankx all for liking the post...

@grumblebee - "Fresh, thick curds" doesnt mean Paneer.. It is just fresh curd.

Try it and lemme know how was it...


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Old 09-27-2006, 02:51 PM   #7
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What is "fresh curd?"
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Old 09-27-2006, 04:07 PM   #8
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Could it be similar to large-curd cottage cheese?
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Old 09-27-2006, 08:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
What is "fresh curd?"
yoghurt.

Full-fat, straight up, natural yoghurt.

I'm fortunate enough to have wonderful yoghurt here in Venezuela.
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Old 09-27-2006, 08:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
Could it be similar to large-curd cottage cheese?
Not even close!

yoghurt is the thing!
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Old 09-27-2006, 10:56 PM   #11
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Aren't large, fresh curds what you get when you separate the whey when making cheese????? You can then take these curds and place in boiling water and squish with the proper gloves on - voila - you have made mozzarella cheese. From there you can roll out and cover with pest, prosciutto, sundried tomatoes, roll up jelly roll fashion and slice. Isn't this the curds referenced to?
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Old 09-28-2006, 02:19 AM   #12
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Reply to Jazz

Thanks Jazz

I love Indian food.
Unfortunately, the link u gave wont work,at the moment. I will get back to it, later.

Mel
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Old 09-28-2006, 02:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Aren't large, fresh curds what you get when you separate the whey when making cheese????? You can then take these curds and place in boiling water and squish with the proper gloves on - voila - you have made mozzarella cheese. From there you can roll out and cover with pest, prosciutto, sundried tomatoes, roll up jelly roll fashion and slice. Isn't this the curds referenced to?
Yeah, that's what I thought... that's why I was thinking the east indian equivelent would be paneer.
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:00 AM   #14
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Wondering why yogurt is called "curd" when it isn't curdled. Don't you add lemon juice or vinegar to make it curdle and create it yogurt cheese?

In the US "curds" are a rubbery fresh cheese.
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:20 AM   #15
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Jennyema the reason it's called curds in India is because yogurt has solids and liquids. The solid portions are called curds and the liquid is whey. In most Indian preparations the solid portions are heavily used ( so you drain our the whey) given the yogurt there is not as thick as say what a middle eastern or greek yogurt looks like.

When you cook with yogurt you lose a lot of volume (as it cooks it converts back into watery liquid) so the thicker the better especially for preparations such as biryani or any other full bodied curry or marinades.
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:21 AM   #16
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Hello

I still cant get onto that website for the byriani receipe.
Would somebody copy and paste it here.

Mel
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:24 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel!
Hello

I still cant get onto that website for the byriani receipe.
Would somebody copy and paste it here.

Mel
This recipe cannot be copied and pasted here because it is copyrighted.

This the reminder that was added to the link: "Please refrain from posting copyrighted recipes. Please see our Copyright Policies in the Community Forum and Announcements."

I think the link works now.
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:27 AM   #18
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Thanks for the info Jennyema!

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Old 09-28-2006, 09:28 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
Jennyema the reason it's called curds in India is because yogurt has solids and liquids. The solid portions are called curds and the liquid is whey. In most Indian preparations the solid portions are heavily used ( so you drain our the whey) given the yogurt there is not as thick as say what a middle eastern or greek yogurt looks like.

When you cook with yogurt you lose a lot of volume (as it cooks it converts back into watery liquid) so the thicker the better especially for preparations such as biryani or any other full bodied curry or marinades.
Yakuta,

Thanks. So the yogurt is drained but not "curdled" (as we in the states know it) by adding acid. Because that would make paneer, right? In this case the yogurt is an ingredient in the sauce, and not a "chunky" ingredient?
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Old 09-28-2006, 09:34 AM   #20
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Wow Kitchenelf
I knew how to make the curds, but the rest of it...
I am certainly putting this in my cookery notes.

Mel
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