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Old 09-17-2004, 10:41 AM   #1
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ISO Bosnian food recipes

Hi all. I am new to this web site and I am really glad that I found it. Perhaps someone can help me with my problem. I am getting married to a man from Bosnia ( I am american ) and I would really like to learn how to make some of the food from his country. I could go to my future in-laws but his mother doesn't speak english that well and I don't speak Bosnian that well either so that is out and I want it to be a surprise. Do any of you have any recipies that you can share with me or maybe let me know where I could find them.

Thanks...
Clueless American Girl... Ronda :)

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Old 09-17-2004, 03:19 PM   #2
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did my best on the web, but not much out there...

here's one for a soup called
Chorba

here's a few, but the English translations are pretty rough...

BOSNIA - HERZEGOVINA / TRADITIONS / RECIPES


here's a sad one...
No-Bake Chocolate War Cake (1994 Bosnia)


If I find anything else, I'll post again.


Good Luck!
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Old 09-20-2004, 12:41 PM   #3
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Bosnian recipes

Hope these help.

Ajvar
2 lg Eggplants
6 lg Red sweet peppers
Salt and pepper
1 Garlic clove, minced
1 Lemon, juiced
1/2 c Olive oil
Parsley, minced

1.Bake eggplants and sweet peppers at 350F until tender when pierced with a fork. Peel skin from hot vegetables and chop or mince the vegetables. Season to taste with salt and pepper and stir in the garlic and lemon juice.
2.Gradually stir in as much of the oil as the vegetables will absorb. Mix well. Pile into a glass dish and sprinkle with parsley.

Pispilita (Cheese Corn Bread)
3 boxes of corn muffin mix
1 1/4 sticks of butter, melted
1 1/4 c milk
1 small package of cream cheese (cubed small)
3 eggs
16 oz large curd cottage cheese
1 c crumbled feta cheese

1.Mix cottage cheese, eggs and cubed cream cheese in large bowl; this will used as a filling.
2.Grease 9x13 baking pan and evenly sprinkle 1/2 box of corn meal into bottom of pan. Drizzle some melted butter and then sprinkle with some milk. Repeat two more layers as above
3.Evenly spread filling over 3rd layer and add crumbled feta cheese
Repeat 3 layers as above (cornbread mix, butter, and milk) over filling.
Dribble some extra melted butter evenly over top layer
4.Bake at 350F for 55 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on rack and cut into squares - best served warm.

Tufahi
6 cooking apples
2 c walnuts, finely chopped
1/2 c sultanas (can use raisins)
2 1/2 c sugar
1 c whipping cream, whipped

1.Peel and core the apples. Mix the walnuts and sultanas.
2.Arrange apples on a baking dish, and fill cavities with the walnut mixture. Dissolve the sugar in 2 c water and pour over the apples. Bake until the apples are soft but not soggy! Serve cold with whipped cream.
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Old 09-20-2004, 02:08 PM   #4
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:D

THanks So much for these. If anyone else finds anything please share.
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Old 10-04-2004, 04:08 PM   #5
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I'm going to monitor this one out of curiousity. My husband's family was all eastern European, but I only learned some of the Slovak/Slovene stuff. What I recommend to anyone going in to another's culture (be it marrying or freindship or anything in between) is as soon as you are ready, ask his Mom to teach YOU how to make his favorite dishes from the old country, rather than trying to accomplish them yourself at first. Get a shopping list from her if time is limited, if not have her go shopping with you. You won't suffer in comparison, and you can really bond in the kitchen. MIL & I were never close freinds, but I treasure the times she taught me halupke, potica, and others.
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Old 10-05-2004, 02:00 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice...I actually learned my lesson the hard way after I burt dinner the other night trying to make on of the dishes. He came home from work and laughed at me because I was crying. We cleaned up the HUGE mess I had made and then went to his grandmothers house and had dinner there. They started talking (in his language) and she started laughing also and she grabbed my hands and started talking. When translated it was something along the lines of 'You silly girl, you come over and I will help you learn" I felt silly but what the heck... I tried and they took it with humor rather than offense...

Thanks So much for the recipies that have been posted but I think I'll let his grandma, mom and aunt teach me this weekend..... :oops:
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Old 10-05-2004, 02:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
I'm going to monitor this one out of curiousity. My husband's family was all eastern European, but I only learned some of the Slovak/Slovene stuff. What I recommend to anyone going in to another's culture (be it marrying or freindship or anything in between) is as soon as you are ready, ask his Mom to teach YOU how to make his favorite dishes from the old country, rather than trying to accomplish them yourself at first. Get a shopping list from her if time is limited, if not have her go shopping with you. You won't suffer in comparison, and you can really bond in the kitchen. MIL & I were never close freinds, but I treasure the times she taught me halupke, potica, and others.
wow, claire, my mil was from slovakia, as well as her best friend that lives with us now. my wife has a cousin in kosice that is going to come live with us as a nanny for a while. i'm looking forward to learning a lot of slovak recipes from her, i'll post them here.
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Old 01-21-2006, 01:19 PM   #8
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Hmm, have u ever heard of Bosnian pot?
http://www.superluminal.com/cookbook...snian_pot.html
soo good, your husband would be muuchoo surprised:)...well, this is 2006..i see your post was in 2004, eek? well uhm, theres toons of recipes ..pilav..basically rice, veggies, and chicken thighs oven-cooked. Im from Serbia myself, so the recipes are pretty much the same.
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Old 02-10-2006, 10:02 PM   #9
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I have to do a culteral dish for school and have chosen to do a bosnian dish but can not find any written in english, I was trying to do the spinach pie or in bosnian zeljanica can anyone help I have to have this made by monday 2/15 at 7am
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Old 02-11-2006, 10:04 AM   #10
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kkcote, this is the only thing that i've found for bosnian spinach and cheese pie, written in english. i'm not sure if it's exactly what you were looking for, but i hope it helps. if you have a recipe in bosnian, i may be able to get it translated for you. i have a few macedonian, bosnian, and albanian friends. (i just don't hang out with them at the same time, if you get my drift... )

Recipe: Bosnian Spinach Pie- serves 8!
1 package thawed filo pastry
2 bags washed fresh spinach
1 egg
1/4 cup sour cream (can use low fat)
1/2 lb feta cheese, crumbled
1 cup shredded mild cheddar cheese
olive oil
1 1/2teaspoons salt
low-fat milk
low-fat plain yogurt (optional)
Preheat oven to 350F Wash and drain spinach. Chop spinach and put in a big glass bowl. Add salt and mix with hands. Leave thespinach to sit for about 10 minutes to allow the salt to draw out the water from the vegetable. Drain the spinach by either squeezing it bit by bit with your hand over the sink or by spinning several times in a salad spinner.Transfer drained spinach into a new bowl.Add egg, and sour cream.Fold in feta and cheddar cheese. Put some olive oil in a small bowl.Grease a 9"*13" glass or metal baking pan.Take your phyllo dough sheets and lie the sheets, stacked, on a dry surface.TIP: (While adding the filling, you may wish to cover the dough with a dry towel and then a damp one to keep it from drying out or flaking) Place one sheet of dough into the pan and cut away excess.Brush with oil, using either your hands or a pastry brush.Repeat until dough is 6 or 7 layers.Add a skim of filling with hands and spread evenly.Repeat steps 16-18 until the pie reaches the top of the pan or you run out of ingredients.Just make sure you finish with the dough on top, sort of like lasagna.Place pie in the oven, uncovered, about 45 minutes.The top becomes flaky.Pour on top of the pie while it is baking, 1/4 cup sour cream blended with 0.125 cup of milk.Bake for 15 more minutes.This dish can be served warm or room temperature. It is traditionally served with a yogurt beverage which is easily replicated by mixing the plain yogurt with milk, in equal parts.
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:08 AM   #11
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Help!!

hey everyone, ok..i was dating a bosnian girl..nicest girl ever!!..but anyways...her mom used to cook, and omg was it ever good..i am looking for any help that would help me try to attemp to make pita...the cheese one!! its like a spiral of shell and its got cheese inside..please any help would be greatly appreciated..thanks in advance
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Old 10-16-2006, 11:14 PM   #12
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First you have to find the appropriate dough. I am assuming that you son't know how to make it, so I would suggest you try various ethnic stores, Turkish, Arabic, Serbian, Albanian... They would carry phyllo dough that is not so flaky and thin as supermarket bought. For the filling you would need cottage cheese, some feta, 3-4 eggs, milk, a little bit of soda water, cream cheese, sour cream and salt. It should not be too runny. Spread some of the filling on one of the thick phyllo dough sheets, roll in a snake shape and then roll into a spiral. Put these spirals into a greased pan and bake at 200F for 45 minutes. It is not as good as the pie made with home-made dough sheets, but it is going to impress her and her family nontheless.
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:20 AM   #13
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Talking Thank you

omg thank you lol...i will do my best and see how it goes..will post back when done making it :)
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Old 09-03-2007, 06:32 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by KurdishKingZ View Post
hey everyone, ok..i was dating a bosnian girl..nicest girl ever!!..but anyways...her mom used to cook, and omg was it ever good..i am looking for any help that would help me try to attemp to make pita...the cheese one!! its like a spiral of shell and its got cheese inside..please any help would be greatly appreciated..thanks in advance
Uhhhh, I wouldn't like to discourage you - but if she made an original Bosnian pie, then the doughleaves were probably home-made. That's the first thing I had to learn when I decided to catch my Bosnian boyfriend forever (who is my husband for years now). Seems like a unacheavable mastership (that's what I thought first time I saw my mother-in-law making them), but after a couple of tries, you can learn it. At least, it looks spectacular, and whenever I am preparing Bosnian cheese pie (pita od sira, sirnica, srednjača - and you can make it with or without eggs, the point is in a good white cheese), I like to do it in front of my astonished guests. Like a magician. :)

If you are ready to try, you will need an old tablecloth, flour, water, salt and oil only. Prepare some lukewarm water - let's say, 3/4 liter - add just a small pinch of salt and mix it with flour using the wooden mixing-spoon (flat laddle). I can't tell you precise amounts because it depends on the flour quality, but when you get something like very soft dough, stop adding flour and go on with mixing. It should be something between mixing and beating, and you will do it until you get thin membrane-like bubbles. (Ten minutes or even less when you are experienced.) Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and leave it for a while - 10 minutes or so. Next step: start adding just small amounts of flour, so that you can start kneading. When you manage to form more or less compact mass and to knead it well (but it must stay soft, take care), put the dough onto your working surface and knead it just a bit more. Oil a tray and put the dough on it, then flatten it with your hands - it should be 2 cm thick and of a rounded shape - grease its upper surface as well with your oiled hand, cover it with an old kitchen towel and leave it for 20 minutes at least. Sprinkle some flour over the spreaded tablecloth (the rougher its surface is, the better), put your "bannock" carefully on it, push your hands under it and start spreading. You shouldn't pull, you just "tickle" it from the center outwards, and you will see how it is turning to a delicate thin sheet. In the end it should be transparent, and as large as a large kitchen table. Edges will always stay thick; some people cut them off, and some like to leave them. I use to run with the knife all round the doughleaf. You have to sprinkle it with oil, to put the filling (keep on mind that you will get 6-8 rolls, so you will put filling in "stripes", leaving some space between). The final magic: You just pull up the hem of the tablecloths, and the doughleaf starts rolling itself. When the first "stripe" of filling is rolled-in, you just make a cut. Also, cut the roll in two, and then you make two spiral pitas. Put them into an oiled baking sheet; repeat the process untill you roll up all the dough. This way you should have 12-16 "snails".

One more secret: you will bake it in a middle temperature (around 200 C), but before it's finished (20 minutes after you put it into the oven), you will put 1/2 liter of water with some salt and a spoon of oil to boil. Spill it all over the pita. Put it back into the oven and bake it for 10 more minutes on 220 C, until it gets a golden-brown specks.

I know it sounds complicated... but when you get used, it's something you can do in no time... and impress anyone! :)
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Old 09-04-2007, 06:44 PM   #15
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i am serbian. so i know plenty of recipies from that regon. my mother and Grandmothers taught them to me. you will probably learn the best from them and they will teach you how the way he is used to eating it, b/c there are sooo many ways to make pasuj, burania, burek, fileveno paprikas, sarma and so on. have fun learning.
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Old 09-04-2007, 07:44 PM   #16
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i am serbian. so i know plenty of recipies from that regon. my mother and Grandmothers taught them to me. you will probably learn the best from them and they will teach you how the way he is used to eating it, b/c there are sooo many ways to make pasuj, burania, burek, fileveno paprikas, sarma and so on. have fun learning.
Oh, chefrachel, I love sarma. Some of my family background is Croatian. Do you have a good recipe for it?
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Old 09-04-2007, 11:38 PM   #17
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I've just posted two different recipes for sarma at Ethnic foods - Balkan mix. Hope you'll find them useful. :)
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:34 PM   #18
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sorry i still did not get the recipe because i have to write it out while i am making it because i do aproximations. so i dont know the measurements. ill get on it though
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Old 04-30-2008, 04:24 PM   #19
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Hi Rhonda,
I too am an American girl married to a Bosnian man. Did you find any good receipes? I have several but I am also looking for a Bosnian Chocolate Torta (cake) receipe. Let me know if you are still looking for receipes.
Tracy

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Originally Posted by 4x4girl View Post
Hi all. I am new to this web site and I am really glad that I found it. Perhaps someone can help me with my problem. I am getting married to a man from Bosnia ( I am american ) and I would really like to learn how to make some of the food from his country. I could go to my future in-laws but his mother doesn't speak english that well and I don't speak Bosnian that well either so that is out and I want it to be a surprise. Do any of you have any recipies that you can share with me or maybe let me know where I could find them.

Thanks...
Clueless American Girl... Ronda :)
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Old 04-30-2008, 04:28 PM   #20
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Sarma

Did you find a recipe for sarma, if not let me know, I have one that was my grandma's-- she was from Croaita. Pretty easy to make and delicious!!

Tracy

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Oh, chefrachel, I love sarma. Some of my family background is Croatian. Do you have a good recipe for it?
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