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Old 12-04-2016, 08:30 AM   #1
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ISO Chicken Parmesan

I use bottled sauce.

Then pound out Chicken Thiehs, and then Bread with canned breaed crumps.

Fry the thies in a bit of oil, then drain and rest.

add a bit of sauce to a glass baking dish, add the flat fried thighs, then top with sliced deli provalone cheese, then more sauce and some spices..

finale layer is good, grated parmession cheese.

bake in oven 350 till done and Parm is brown.

I like this dish, but I am not just Wowhed By it" as most people are..

My Father likes this dish better with Eggplant?

Am I missing something here?

Eric. Austin Tx.

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Old 12-04-2016, 08:45 AM   #2
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How about layering in some Ricotta Cheese or Cottage Cheese? Or even Creme Fraiche?
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Old 12-04-2016, 09:03 AM   #3
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The more common cheeses are mozzarella and parm. Also, don't pound the chicken too thin. Do you flavor the breading? Maybe you cold try a different sauce?
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Old 12-04-2016, 09:07 AM   #4
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Imo, chicken parm should be made with breasts, not thighs.

Pound out a breast, but not too thin. This will help tenderize it, but you also don't want it too thin. I hate breaded chicken cutlets that are as much breading as chicken.

Pat breast dry with a paper towel, dip in lightly whipped eggwhites, then press into Italian seasoned breadcrumbs. You can make ypur own seasoned breadcrumbs, or even use panko, but we prefer 4C brand or Progresso brand Italian seasoned breadcrumbs.

Lightly fry in just a few tablespoons of either light olive oil or grapeseed oil on each side, but just to toast the breadcrumbs and partially cook the chicken.

Then do the rest of what you mentioned. Put a thick layer of sauce in a baking dish, nestle in the breaded breasts a bit, then top with a sprinkling of grated parmesan cheese, and a good layer of shredded mozarella cheese.

Bake at 375 for 15 minutes or maybe a little longer until the cheese is melted and the sauce on the edges is bubbling. The chicken should finish cooking through at this point.

Hth.
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Old 12-04-2016, 10:11 AM   #5
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In Italy, ricotta is frequently used to make a cheese type sauce, forget about the béchamel (that's for lasagne). Parmesan, or Grana Padano, or Pecorino romano or Pecorino Sardo, according to where you live, add the zing:

Example recipe: Roman pasta and broccoli with ricotta and Pecorino romano:

Onions and garlic chopped
Blanched broccoli florettes
chilli flakes to taste
black pepper, and salt
tortiglioni - about 400g for 2 people

Put the pasta on to cook
Sweat the onions garlic and chill flakes in olive oil while the pasta is cooking.
Steam the broccoli
Mix the broccoli, onions etc and then add the ricotta
Mix in the cooked pasta and put a good dusting of pecorino romano over it.

No butter. no flour. no milk. The sauce comes out very well anyway.
This method of cooking pasta is very popular in Italy, and you can improvise your own versions - oh, by the way: lower in calories!

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Old 12-04-2016, 10:13 AM   #6
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You can make the same sauce for chicken. Why not improvise, and create your own!

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Old 12-05-2016, 11:48 AM   #7
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I don't layer this dish. My mother did. I use single serving oval bake ware or I put each piece of breaded and fried chicken on a cookie sheet. Cover with sauce, top with mozzarella, bake until cheese is melted and getting some color and finish with chopped parsley and Parmesan cheese.

I use my homemade Marinara sauce.
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Old 12-05-2016, 11:54 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I don't layer this dish. My mother did. I use single serving oval bake ware or I put each piece of breaded and fried chicken on a cookie sheet. Cover with sauce, top with mozzarella, bake until cheese is melted and getting some color and finish with chopped parsley and Parmesan cheese.

I use my homemade Marinara sauce.
We make individual servings of eggplant parm and chicken parm. The eggplant and chicken get less "gloppy" for lack of a better term if you do it that way. The fried coating stays pretty crisp even with leftovers and doesn't get as soggy as it does if you make it casserole style. I won't even eat eggplant parm anymore if it's casserole style. Never really liked it that much to begin with but it's okay if made in individual servings.

I certainly agree with making a sauce. If you are going to all the trouble of messing with the eggplant and/or chicken, then why not make the sauce too? No preservatives, you know everything that went into it and you can make it to your taste perfectly.
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Old 12-05-2016, 12:31 PM   #9
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I prepare my chicken breasts as Bucky does but I cook them completely in the pan then put them under the broiler with mozzarella and parm until the cheese is bubbly and beginning to brown.

One of the attractions of this dish is the crispness of the breading.
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Old 12-07-2016, 12:09 PM   #10
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We make individual servings of eggplant parm and chicken parm. The eggplant and chicken get less "gloppy" for lack of a better term if you do it that way. The fried coating stays pretty crisp even with leftovers and doesn't get as soggy as it does if you make it casserole style. I won't even eat eggplant parm anymore if it's casserole style. Never really liked it that much to begin with but it's okay if made in individual servings.

I certainly agree with making a sauce. If you are going to all the trouble of messing with the eggplant and/or chicken, then why not make the sauce too? No preservatives, you know everything that went into it and you can make it to your taste perfectly.
If we had a "Thanks" button, I would have clicked on it.
I love eggplant though. Crispy fried with freshly grated Parmesan and chopped Italian parsley for garnish is a favorite.

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I prepare my chicken breasts as Bucky does but I cook them completely in the pan then put them under the broiler with mozzarella and parm until the cheese is bubbly and beginning to brown.
One of the attractions of this dish is the crispness of the breading.
Agree 100%. The presentation also is much prettier. And I like the crispness of the chicken that you cannot achieve with a layered dish.
Just makes more sense to me.
Also, this is how every restaurant I have ever had this dish in served it.
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Old 12-07-2016, 01:24 PM   #11
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I'm all in for the individual chicken or eggplant parmesan, with the crispy bottom, sauced cheesed! That is really the only way you can keep eggplant crispy, after you fry it up, put three slices in a freezer bag, and freeze. Then when you want to have it, put each individual slice on the pan, sauce it and cheese it, bake it, it is delightful.
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Old 12-07-2016, 03:46 PM   #12
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Sort of like the wet vs dry rib debate, I'm definitely a saucy chicken parm person vs extra crispy.

In fact, I usually have to order a side or or a little extra sauce when I'm served the crispier chicken parm. My mom made her's saucy and it was awesome every time, so that's just our thing. Because of the extra sauce, I also don't like thick breading, so I skip the flour step in breading and just go directly with seasoned crumbs

I remember when I was a teenager and had my wisdom teeth removed, my mom happened to make chicken parm that night. I wasn't supposed to eat anything solid having stitches in my mouth, but mom's parm was so delicious I couldn't resist. So I threw some chicken parm, sauce, and a little water in a blender and made a slightly chunky chicken parm shake.

Gross? Probably, but that's my story.
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Old 12-07-2016, 03:58 PM   #13
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I like to sauce it like a pizza. Leaving a little rim around the outside of crispy coating. Then, the same with the cheese. Don't like messy parms..
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Old 12-07-2016, 04:00 PM   #14
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Like buckytom, I too prefer the Progresso Seasoned Bread Crumbs. My whole family loves garlic, so anytime I am using the seasoned crumbs, I add about 1-2 tsp. of garlic powder to the crumbs. You can add any additional seasoning you prefer to the crumbs.
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Old 12-07-2016, 06:46 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
Sort of like the wet vs dry rib debate, I'm definitely a saucy chicken parm person vs extra crispy.

In fact, I usually have to order a side or or a little extra sauce when I'm served the crispier chicken parm. My mom made her's saucy and it was awesome every time, so that's just our thing. Because of the extra sauce, I also don't like thick breading, so I skip the flour step in breading and just go directly with seasoned crumbs

I remember when I was a teenager and had my wisdom teeth removed, my mom happened to make chicken parm that night. I wasn't supposed to eat anything solid having stitches in my mouth, but mom's parm was so delicious I couldn't resist. So I threw some chicken parm, sauce, and a little water in a blender and made a slightly chunky chicken parm shake.

Gross? Probably, but that's my story.
Baby food chicken parm or chicken parm smoothie!
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:50 PM   #16
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The Alzheimer patients at The Club in Winthrop that are fast approaching the difficult times of the disease, are fed smoothies. They consist of the very same food that the rest of the patients eat, only in a form they can swallow.
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Old 12-07-2016, 10:05 PM   #17
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The Alzheimer patients at The Club in Winthrop that are fast approaching the difficult times of the disease, are fed smoothies. They consist of the very same food that the rest of the patients eat, only in a form they can swallow.
Seriously, Addie? Don't the patients there at Winthrop get meal help according to their dietary limitations and abilities? I would have been very upset if my mother was there and was given ground up smoothie leftovers from the dinner menu.
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Old 12-07-2016, 10:08 PM   #18
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I like to sauce it like a pizza. Leaving a little rim around the outside of crispy coating. Then, the same with the cheese. Don't like messy parms..
Same here.
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Old 12-07-2016, 11:07 PM   #19
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Seriously, Addie? Don't the patients there at Winthrop get meal help according to their dietary limitations and abilities? I would have been very upset if my mother was there and was given ground up smoothie leftovers from the dinner menu.
They are not leftovers. Every day the truck pulls up with the hot food that will be served to everyone. For those like myself, the food is the same as you would eat in your own home. Only it is salt free.

But there are patients who live there in need of constant care. Every day they come down to the social room to be with other people. For Alzheimer patients, eventually the muscles in their throat make swallowing very difficult. These patients get the same food that everyone else gets. Only all the food on my plate, which is the same at the AP, is placed in a large blender. They have to drink their meals.

The meals are planned for the month by a panel of dieticians and doctors. And the person in the on-site kitchen can tell you the dietary quirks and needs of each patients. If you don't like today's menu, that is fine. You can have any one of three sandwiches.

I have been part of ESP (Elder Service Plan) for ten years. Not once, have I ever heard an employee yell at any patient. I have seen AP patients hit them, scream at them and commit other offenses. Other care takers see what is going on and rush over to relieve the targeted employee. Sometimes a patient without any sensible reason, does not like a certain caregiver at that moment. There is no rhyme or reason for the actions of a patient with advanced Alzheimer's. Yet every moment of every day, every patient is treated with respect.

When I went last month to get my vitals checked, on the menu was a full Thanksgiving Dinner. I left just as the plates of food came out of the kitchen. Those plates were load with as much food as you would be serving in your own home. Only without salt. Dessert was ice cream and pie!
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Old 12-08-2016, 03:24 AM   #20
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