"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-12-2019, 02:26 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
Chipotles are a favorite of many, and the dried ones are the best flavored, but not mild!

There is no such thing as a chipotle that ISNT dried. Chipotle peppers are, by definition, dried, smoked jalapenos.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 02:43 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 2,312
CWS4322 Indian food can be daunting to some, but it's one that I got obsessed with, and tried to learn all I could about it. I also got the spices needed, and organized them in 4 boxes - one with the masalas, or spice mixes, one labeled "Most used Indian spices", one is the lesser used spices, and one with larger jars to refill the things like coriander, mustard seed, cumin, and things like that. All I have to grab, for most dishes, is the most used, then I measure them out into little cups, on a plate, and when measuring these out, I'll measure the ones out, added at the same time during cooking, to the same cup - easier to add while cooking. I do this with many types of cooking, but Indian has the most ingredients, as a rule. Here's an example of one I made recently:
Curry leaves and spices, ready to pan roast for sambar masala. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

If you want to talk Indian, we'll have to start another thread. Suffice it to say, it is usually much faster for me to cook Asian, in general, than Mexican. Though many of the Asian dishes have more ingredients, they are fast to make, as a rule. While not all Mexican dishes based on dried chiles are as complex as a mole, just a basic one goes like this: slit the chiles, and remove the core, and the seeds and veins. Flatten out, and toast in a dry skillet. When done, soak in hot water for 30 min. Meanwhile, dry-roast some garlic in the skillet, for about 15 min., and any spices you may need in the dish. Cool and grind the spices; peel the garlic, cutting off the root tips, and place in blender. When. Chiles are soft, drain, and place in blender, adding some liquid (the soaking liquid is often bitter - taste first), and blend until smooth, adding just enough liquid for the salsa to circulate. Pour through a medium mesh strainer, pressing through the strainer, leaving the seeds and skin, scraping off the bottom of the strainer.

Heat up oil in a sauté pan over medium high heat. Pour in salsa, and cook, scraping the pan constantly with a silicone spatula, until it becomes almost a paste, 6-8 minutes usually. Add the water, or broth called for in the recipe, and set aside. Now, it's ready to cook the chicken, turkey, pork, beef, fish, or whatever comes next in the recipe.

This is why this always takes me longer, but it is so worth it!
__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 03:18 PM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
While not all Mexican dishes based on dried chiles are as complex as a mole, just a basic one goes like this: slit the chiles, and remove the core, and the seeds and veins. Flatten out, and toast in a dry skillet. When done, soak in hot water for 30 min. Meanwhile, dry-roast some garlic in the skillet, for about 15 min., and any spices you may need in the dish. Cool and grind the spices; peel the garlic, cutting off the root tips, and place in blender. When. Chiles are soft, drain, and place in blender, adding some liquid (the soaking liquid is often bitter - taste first), and blend until smooth, adding just enough liquid for the salsa to circulate. Pour through a medium mesh strainer, pressing through the strainer, leaving the seeds and skin, scraping off the bottom of the strainer.

Heat up oil in a sauté pan over medium high heat. Pour in salsa, and cook, scraping the pan constantly with a silicone spatula, until it becomes almost a paste, 6-8 minutes usually. Add the water, or broth called for in the recipe, and set aside. Now, it's ready to cook the chicken, turkey, pork, beef, fish, or whatever comes next in the recipe.

This is why this always takes me longer, but it is so worth it!
If I'm taking the time to make a dish that includes a sauce like this, I make a lot and freeze some. It's not worth it for a weeknight dinner. For the OP's information, sauces made from fresh ingredients are much quicker and easier.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2019, 05:16 PM   #24
Head Chef
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 2,312
I agree, GG, the fresh based recipes are easier, and I make a lot of those in the summer, with all those garden vegetables! Too bad avocados don't grow here. And I almost always make a double recipe, when making one of those "fried sauce" based recipes. However, it's not easy to do much more than that - too much sauce, and it won't cook down fast enough, even in a 12" sauté pan. In fact, I remember Bayless pointing this out in one of his early shows, and he said that they obviously can't be making large amounts of these sauces in a restaurant, using this method, so their method is to put a large amount of the diluted sauce in a stock pot, and simmer it 5-6 hours. It's amazing how the frying of the sauce replaces several hours of simmering!
__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2019, 08:03 AM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: edinburgh
Posts: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MostlyWater View Post
We went out for DH's 59th birthday and he requested Mexican.

It was WAY too spicy for me but I think I could create some of the dishes at home, with a lot less heat.

I had a rice bowl and he had a wrap type thingie.

Anyone make Mexican style food at home? it's doable, right?
No, not tried yet but wish to try it at home.
kenmiller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2019, 08:23 AM   #26
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,447
Homemade tamales with green rice and Tex-Mex chili gravy.

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 05:06 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,666
Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Mexican ( at least in my opinion) is one of the easier ethnic cuisines to make at home and have it taste like you get it in the restaurant.

Also, as you mentioned, you have complete control of the 'heat'.
easy for you to say.

I make few things at home, but have been afraid to try to make most of it. Added problem is Kosher for me.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 06:31 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
easy for you to say.

I make few things at home, but have been afraid to try to make most of it. Added problem is Kosher for me.
It really is pretty easy to make most Mexican food. And authentic Mexican doesn't typically include cheese or sour cream - those are more Tex/Mex and Southeastern ingredients - so it should be pretty easy to make them kosher.

Search for Rick Bayless's YouTube channel - he demonstrates a lot of pretty quick and simple recipes. And his website has the written recipes for his TV shows.

https://www.rickbayless.com/recipes-...-rick-bayless/
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 07:20 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 25,456
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Aren't there also Mexican dishes that are vegetarian?
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 08:00 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Aren't there also Mexican dishes that are vegetarian?
Lots, although pork and chicken are pretty popular.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 08:08 PM   #31
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,681
We actually have a vegetarian Mexican cookbook. We make several recipes out of it, though we sometimes add an animal protein.
medtran49 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 08:13 PM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 25,456
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Lots, although pork and chicken are pretty popular.
I was thinking of Charlie. Vegetarian is usually kosher, it can depend on the cheese, whether or not it is.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2019, 09:18 PM   #33
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I was thinking of Charlie. Vegetarian is usually kosher, it can depend on the cheese, whether or not it is.
I know. I was just answering your question.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2019, 06:48 AM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 12,172
I forgot carnitas. Easy to do the pork in the Instant Pot/pressure cooker.

Click image for larger version

Name:	carntas_081417_IMG_2708.JPG
Views:	64
Size:	183.1 KB
ID:	37357

Click image for larger version

Name:	carntas_taco_081417_IMG_2702.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	43.8 KB
ID:	37358
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2019, 09:26 AM   #35
Senior Cook
 
ScottinPollock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: West slope of the Sierra Nevada
Posts: 479
Last night's taco...

ScottinPollock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.