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Old 01-14-2006, 10:44 AM   #1
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NOT Toad in the Hole... Help!

I tried to do a search for a recipe, THINKING that you call it Toad in the Hole over there on your island nation. Nope. What is Toad in the Hole, I thought was Bangers and Mash. Anyway, now that I have my culinary terms correct... I don't know what this is called and can't google for it.

The recipe I'm looking for is basically a roast beef and pud, but the Yorkshire pud is the actual BOWL that the roast beef is in. I'm trying to figure out how to make the pud into this bowl shape. Do any of you Brits, Scots, Welsh or Irish have some help for this yankee expat?

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Old 01-14-2006, 11:28 AM   #2
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Make your yorkshire pudding in individual

cups, like popovers, which is basically what they are.
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Old 01-14-2006, 12:48 PM   #3
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No, no, no. I can do it in the little cups. I'm looking for the recipe to make it in a big bowl shape. I've never seen it anywhere but in the UK, at a pub.
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Old 01-14-2006, 05:44 PM   #4
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Make up a traditional Yorkshire pudding mix (I'm almost certain I've posted it on here at some time). Then, instead of making it in individual roasting dishes or bun dishes, use a larger baking pan, suitable say, for making an 6 or 7 inch sponge.

Whilst it's cooking, slice some roast beef, make an onion gravy... Voila - large sized yorkshire puds with roast beef in onion gravy.

I know I've posted a Toad in the Hole recipe here, too.
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Old 01-15-2006, 11:03 AM   #5
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Ishbel, Daisy... thank you. I will let you know how it turns out.
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Old 01-15-2006, 12:54 PM   #6
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Hi, I've made this yorkshire recipe for my husband and he LOVED it. Also, try drizzling heavy cream and honey over the pudding, saw it done on Nigella Bites, Very yummy!!

oops...so sorry for not mentioning the author, this recipe is by nigell Lawson, author of Nigella Bites. I hope the copyright police doesn't get me. =)

Weekend: Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding

Roast Beef:
1 pound per person
Dry mustard

Yorkshire Pudding:
1 1/4 cups of milk
4 eggs
Scant 1/2 teaspoon of salt
Freshly milled black pepper
1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, sifted
1 tablespoon of beef dripping or vegetable oil to taste

Roast Beef: I think many people underplay how much meat you need. For six people, I wouldn't consider getting under five pounds, which, in other words, is about a pound per person. A roast is a sad prospect without the possibility of leftovers. For a rib, you should add on about two pounds extra here.

For rare meat, you can either cook the beef at 475° F for 15 minutes and then turn it down to 350° F for about 15 minutes per pound--or cook at 425° F throughout for about 15 minutes per pound. I usually do 15 minutes per pound and then add on an extra five minutes, so that those who don't like rare meat have a bit of slightly more cooked beef from the ends. Those who don't like blood don't have to get it; the rest of us gratifyingly do. Use a meat thermometer to determine doneness exactly. The internal temperature for rare beef is 120° F; for medium-rare, it is 125° F-130° F; for medium it is 140° F.

All I do to the beef is massage it with dry mustard powder after I've taken it out of the fridge. I use a knob of dripping for the pan, but you could use whatever fat or oil you have at hand.

Yorkshire Pudding: The oven should be heated to 450° F. Mix the milk, eggs and salt and add pepper, beating all well together. I use my freestanding mixer, the fabulous KitchenAidTM, but any hand-held electric mixer (rotary or balloon whisk) will do. Let these ingredients stand for 15 minutes and then whisk in the flour. Meanwhile, add the dripping to the pan and put it in the oven to heat for about 10 minutes. Into this intensely hot pan, you should put the batter and cook for 20 minutes or until well puffed and golden. Bring it, triumphant, to the table.
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Old 01-15-2006, 04:38 PM   #7
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I can make the pud in single servings. I know how to make it. It was making it into the shape of a bowl that I was looking for. Ishbel gave me what I was looking for.
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Old 01-15-2006, 07:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luv4Prada
Hi, I've made this yorkshire recipe for my husband and he LOVED it. Also, try drizzling heavy cream and honey over the pudding, saw it done on Nigella Bites, Very yummy!!

Weekend: Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding

Roast Beef:
1 pound per person
Dry mustard

Yorkshire Pudding:
1 1/4 cups of milk
4 eggs
Scant 1/2 teaspoon of salt
Freshly milled black pepper
1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, sifted
1 tablespoon of beef dripping or vegetable oil to taste

Roast Beef: I think many people underplay how much meat you need. For six people, I wouldn't consider getting under five pounds, which, in other words, is about a pound per person. A roast is a sad prospect without the possibility of leftovers. For a rib, you should add on about two pounds extra here.

For rare meat, you can either cook the beef at 475° F for 15 minutes and then turn it down to 350° F for about 15 minutes per pound--or cook at 425° F throughout for about 15 minutes per pound. I usually do 15 minutes per pound and then add on an extra five minutes, so that those who don't like rare meat have a bit of slightly more cooked beef from the ends. Those who don't like blood don't have to get it; the rest of us gratifyingly do. Use a meat thermometer to determine doneness exactly. The internal temperature for rare beef is 120° F; for medium-rare, it is 125° F-130° F; for medium it is 140° F.

All I do to the beef is massage it with dry mustard powder after I've taken it out of the fridge. I use a knob of dripping for the pan, but you could use whatever fat or oil you have at hand.

Yorkshire Pudding: The oven should be heated to 450° F. Mix the milk, eggs and salt and add pepper, beating all well together. I use my freestanding mixer, the fabulous KitchenAidTM, but any hand-held electric mixer (rotary or balloon whisk) will do. Let these ingredients stand for 15 minutes and then whisk in the flour. Meanwhile, add the dripping to the pan and put it in the oven to heat for about 10 minutes. Into this intensely hot pan, you should put the batter and cook for 20 minutes or until well puffed and golden. Bring it, triumphant, to the table.
Also, I think there must be some copyright rules about cutting and pasting recipes from other sites without citing them.
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:27 PM   #9
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My grandmother was from England but I have never seen York. Pud. much less tasted it. Can you tell me what it is like? Sort of a bread?
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:48 PM   #10
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They are sooooo good Dove, it's like an American pop-over. Have you ever had those? If not both are light and airy with a taste a tiny bit like unsweetened pancake batter. They are largely hollow when cooked, but still filling at the same time. My mom made these all the time when we were kids, it didn't have to be with roast beef (though sometimes it was). She just used a dab of butter in place of the beef drippings in the bottom of the muffin tins and they turned out fantastically
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Old 01-15-2006, 10:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
I can make the pud in single servings. I know how to make it. It was making it into the shape of a bowl that I was looking for. Ishbel gave me what I was looking for.
Actually I made this in a Le Creuset 3 1/2-qt. braiser and it came out perfect
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Old 01-15-2006, 10:41 PM   #12
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This is just a guess, but I'm thinking that Yorkshire pudding, baked in a muffin (popover) tin, would be much like a puff pastry made from choux paste in texture and flavor, but with a beef accent from that meat's fats and juices. Is that a correct guess?

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Old 01-16-2006, 01:05 AM   #13
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I guess the best way to describe it, is as a sort of dumpling. Crisp-ish on the outside, and fluffy in the middle, though it softens quickly - especially when you smother it with gravy. Very more-ish in flavour, but very filling.
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Old 01-16-2006, 03:58 AM   #14
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It's not quite as light as a choux bun, GW!

Traditionally, in Yorkshire, where it originated - it was served as a starter, with onion gravy - in order to fill you up before eating the meat main course - although it is known as the accompaniment for roast beef, it is served with other roasts, eg pork and lamb.

If there was any left overy, canny Yorkshire housewives served it for pudding, smeared with jam or marmalade
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Old 01-16-2006, 08:57 AM   #15
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I did a quick google for a photograph of a large sized Yorkshire pud with either sausage or roast beef filling. The best I could find was from an American's blog about a visit to a pub in Kensington! The photograph is good, though - it's about half way down the opening page!

http://stellaland.typepad.com/stellabites/
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Old 01-16-2006, 12:08 PM   #16
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My mouth is watering, Ish. My mother made wonderful Yorkshire pudding with roast beef...we ate it as a side dish, along with the carrots, potatoes and gravy.
I love the looks of the Toad in a Hole, but we are trying to lose some weight, and I don't think it's on the low-calorie list.
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Old 01-16-2006, 12:29 PM   #17
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Great stuff. Thanks for the info. And that Toad in the Hole picture looked wonderful.

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Old 01-16-2006, 01:16 PM   #18
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vel, this is not a toad in the hole, but thought I would share it as the pudding can be made w/o the roast. Since it is made inside muffin cups, wondering if we can experiment and place the little individual cups over the tins while cooling to make a smaller version of what you had in mind.

Blue Cheese Yorkshire Pudding

1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup 2% low-fat milk
1/3 cup (1 1/3 ounces) crumbled blue cheese
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
1 large egg white
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 450°.

Combine first 7 ingredients in a bowl; beat at medium speed of a mixer until smooth. Beat at high speed 15 seconds; set aside. Divide oil evenly among 8 muffin cups; coat sides of cups with cooking spray. Place muffin cups in a 450° oven for 3 minutes. Divide batter evenly among prepared cups; bake at 450° for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°; bake an additional 15 minutes or until golden.
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Old 01-16-2006, 03:20 PM   #19
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You can see the recipes above. It's really quite tasteless alone, but somehow becomes something heavenly when it's topped with the roast beef and gravy. The texture is just amazing and it really completes a meal. Give it a whirl!
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Old 02-06-2006, 03:32 PM   #20
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How funny. My ex's family used to call a piece of toast with a hole cut into it (with a biscuit cutter or drinking glass), then fried with an egg in the middle, "toad in a hole". But then many families I know call stuffed cabbage rolls "pigs in a blanket", then others call a hot dog rolled in dough and baked that. There are so many dishes that have different names in different locations. Hubby and I joke that our theme song should be Johnny Cash's "I've been everywhere, man", and when it comes to food, recipes, drinks, etc, you'd be amazed at what you can come up with right in our own country.
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