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Old 04-04-2006, 07:04 AM   #41
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Thanks Flukx for the detailed info on the Polish pierogies!! My favourite is indeed the classic one with potatoes and cheese. I don't know much about Polish gastronomic culture, but the little I know, they are very nice. Of course pierogies are wonderful, then this delicious dessert pychotka, and I find some of their chocolates and candies excellent. Can you tell us more about your culinary experience in Krakow? I, for one, will be very interested!!
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Old 04-04-2006, 07:07 AM   #42
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You know I never heard of these lil buggers till a friend of mine told me her daughter was home and requested she make them for her. I guess its something special she made every now and then. I'll have to give them a try sometime.
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Old 04-10-2006, 08:25 AM   #43
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Polish food

I am not sure you could label my time in Krakow as a culinary experience, as the cuisine is fairly simple (meat and potatoes and cabbage). Ethnic food in Krakow is virtually non-existant despite the best attempts by some. I once got fajitas at the "best" Mexican restaurant and I ended up getting a pool of oil with some vegetables and unseasoned chicken. Oh, and cabbage of course. Anyhow, I can give you an idea of a few traditional dishes.

Borscht, or beetroot soup is very common. I never tried making it myself, but it comes in a variety of formats. I am sure there are recipes abound available either on DC or elsewhere.

Bigos, or "farmers stew" is basically a lot of grated cabbage/sauerkraut that was "marinated" in vinegar, with whatever meat is available (kielbasa, pork, bacon bits are most common), onion, a small amount of tomato paste/sauce, salt, peppers, whatever spices on hand.

Golabki (pronounced go-womp-key, approximately), which is similar to bigos except the contents are wrapped in a parboiled cabbage leaf with cooked rice and then baked for an hour or two with a tomato souplike sauce.

Sledzie marynowane, or pickled herring, is quite popular, especially around Christmas (they eat TWELVE courses for Christmas dinner, I wont even begin to explain, but it symbolizes twelve months/apostles...) Quite simple, really. Take salt herring and a few peppercorns and soak in cold water for 24 hours, changing every 8 hours or so. Remove the milt, skin, bones and cut each herring into 4 pieces. Chop two onions and layer the onions and herring in a jar and pour boiled vinegar and 1 tspn sugar into jar and let sit in a cool place overnight.

Another common thing is to make dumplings stuffed with fruit such as peach or apricots. Basically a simple german type Knodel (dumpling) made from mashed potatoes, flour, and egg with the dough rolled around the fruit. Served with a butter/cream/sugar sauce.

Well, there are a few ideas. Mostly just a variation on the meat and potatoes diet. A lot of cabbage, pork cutlets, and boiled potatoes.
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Old 04-25-2006, 10:07 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
My perohe dough is as follows.

3 cups of flour
one egg in a measuring cup beaten, fill to the one cup mark with water, then add about 1/4 cup oil

Stir liquid into dry and mix until dough is smooth. Let it sit for at least an hour before you try to work it.

Roll it out to a bit less than 1/4 inch thickness and make your perogies from there. Good luck.
Do you think these rolls would work well with egg rolls also?
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Old 04-25-2006, 10:21 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debbie

Pyrogies & Caesar Salad
Yield: 4

Nice looking recipe

Thanks
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Old 04-25-2006, 10:28 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debbie
well, yesterday I made the recipe from the food network, and it was the first time I made them.... and they tasted really good.. but did not look all brown like that picture.. after I boiled them.. they were kinda soggy.. and I had to be VERY careful when I put them back into the pan with the onions or they would fall apart, so they were soft... ok guys so whats the secret so they are not like that. They were delicious and the dough was great, but I would like to have a better presentation... any hints???
You'll have to ask Alex or RonJohn to make sure, but is it possible that you were using a pastry flour and the recipe calls for a bread or hard flour???
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:17 PM   #47
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After finding this place: http://www.milliespierogi.com/ I would never bother making them myself again. I've even sent pierogi as gifts from this place, & the thanks were effusive.
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:51 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
My perohe dough is as follows.

3 cups of flour
one egg in a measuring cup beaten, fill to the one cup mark with water, then add about 1/4 cup oil

Stir liquid into dry and mix until dough is smooth. Let it sit for at least an hour before you try to work it.

Roll it out to a bit less than 1/4 inch thickness and make your perogies from there. Good luck.
ok I am gonna try this again.. using your recipe.. after you boil them... what exactly do you do with them.. to get the nice texture. step by step so they don't turn mushy again :)
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Old 03-27-2007, 09:24 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Oh for goodness sakes...I said LESS than 1/4 inch! I don't measure my dough, I just roll it. LOL. 1/8 is pretty thin and you will need to be pretty careful with your filling if you roll it that thin. Get it CLOSE to that. This is not an exact science by any means.

Also, this dough will spring back when you roll it so expect that to happen. The idea is to roll it out and get the rough shape and then shape it with your hands when you fill it.

I like to cut the dough into squares and then make a sort of pocket in the center and then seal it corner to corner so you have little triangular shaped dumplings.

Charlie, you goofball! I'd be fired for sure since I wouldn't cook that 50 year old beef! LMAO. And my Guido called the potato stuffed ones perohe, not vareniki. He called something else vareniki...the sweet ones I think.
My Baba is from Ukraine, her and the rest of my family call them petehea (not sure on the spelling)-pronounced PET AH HEH. Ive never heard anyone else call pierogies this name before. Is this the name for a different type of pierogi? just curious...
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Old 03-28-2007, 12:22 PM   #50
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Brandon, thats how we pronounce them too and my dad spelled them perohe.
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Old 03-28-2007, 10:11 PM   #51
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Alix, he is talking about completely different thing, Petuhee is what he is saying, are not perogy/perohe. I never heard it called that. Petuhee is a word that means roosters.
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Old 03-29-2007, 10:44 AM   #52
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Charlie, I think it must be a dialectical thing. What he is describing is EXACTLY what we always called "pet e he". However, when spelled out it looks different.

You are a little closer to the "old country" than the rest of us. I do suspect however that there are regional differences in pronunciation and then when folks emigrate their pronunciation changes even further as they learn a new language and their kids (and grandkids) learn the words a bit differently.

Brandon's word, as I said, is exactly how we have pronounced it, and his description is what we make too.
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Old 03-29-2007, 11:23 AM   #53
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Peppermint leaves? Have you ever done that mish?
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Old 03-29-2007, 11:36 AM   #54
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Nope, I'm a purist. I only ever do cheese and potato filling. I've tried lots of other ones, (including a sauerkraut filling) but the potato is just the way to go IMO. I was just curious about the mint taste in there.
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Old 03-29-2007, 11:53 AM   #55
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okay, ladies when are you going to be making all of the above, i'm coming over. i love vareniki, oh fine call them perohy, but not peetuhy. i actually just made some with potato, of course by the time i got home the all potatoes were gone, all that was left was meat, but i did not like eat. the leftover meat i had was ot the best tasting meat.
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Old 03-29-2007, 12:11 PM   #56
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Ah, who needs liver it's cholesterol in it's purist form. I think even shmaltz is healthier. I do not like liver. But kosher Liver bratwurst I had in Issrael was sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo good and it remind me of my childhood that I would not mind some of that right now. I like to use stewed chicken for filling, if it's meat filling.
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Old 04-02-2007, 10:34 PM   #57
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I just scanned through this thread…between making dinner (beef stew and dumplings) and chasing my three year old son, Avery. Thought I would add a Rumanian twist to the mix. This recipe comes from a book produced by my grandma’s church back in the 60’s or 70’s I would guess. The recipe was submitted by Count Dracula (LOL) and is for “Roumanian Perogies”

4 cups flour
1 tbsp butter
2 tbsp oil

Mix like pie crust.

Add:
1 egg, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
1 ½ cups warm water

Mix to a soft dough. Let stand for 15 minutes, cover with a bowl before rolling out.

I usually will make a large batch and freeze as them on floured cookie sheets and then pop them into freezer bags for later.
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Old 01-27-2013, 09:04 AM   #58
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Quote:
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Alix, he is talking about completely different thing, Petuhee is what he is saying, are not perogy/perohe. I never heard it called that. Petuhee is a word that means roosters.
It may be they called them Petuhee which means Rooster, because the look like the Comb on the roosters head...
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Old 01-27-2013, 09:11 AM   #59
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Wow, 2006 thread!
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:48 AM   #60
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Wow, 2006 thread!
Yeah! It always amazes me how very old threads are revived.
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