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Old 01-03-2012, 11:00 AM   #1
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Pierogies

I have been making my own Pierogies (sorry Mrs. T) and now my friends want me to make them a batch. I will need to freeze them ( the pierogies, not my friends ) and my question is...do I boil then freeze or freeze after forming them ?? Happy New Year !!!

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Old 01-03-2012, 11:03 AM   #2
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I wouldn't boil them. I would just freeze them. I don't think the store bought ones are precooked in any way. I could be wrong, though.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:12 AM   #3
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When you make them, before you boil them, set them on a cookie sheet or half sheet pan covered with a piece of waxed paper, lightly dusted in flour and freeze them. Once they are frozen, put a dozen in a zip lock bag and freeze, and use them just like Mrs. T's.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:37 AM   #4
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I agree with blissful!

I would only add that you should invite your friends over for a pierogi making party so they can see how it is done.

Maybe if you teach them you will find a package of homemade pierogies coming your way from time to time!

For me that would be better than a dozen roses!
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:41 AM   #5
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Making perogies is very time consuming, bending over the table or counter for a very long time if you were to make a few dozen.

Yes, invite your cooking friends over and make them together--it's always more fun that way.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:37 PM   #6
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Thanks to Poles all products of this kind are called as perogies.
Actually perogies it is pies with a stuffing. Baked.


That that you make likely or pelmeni or manti (steam).

In Siberia them traditionally do much for once (very much).
After them blind it expose on a frost. (It is often simple on a balcony)
In your case use a deep-freezer.

When it is required to prepare them.
Will boil water, salt it. Add perogies in boiled water also wait when will cook.
And you know that such smetana (sour cream)?
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:05 PM   #7
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Thanks to Poles all products of this kind are called as perogies.
Actually perogies it is pies with a stuffing. Baked.


That that you make likely or pelmeni or manti (steam).
Or vareniki, or ... the list goees on. Every nation has something simular.

What they called in Russia is irrelevant. Here they are called pierogi, I finally had to give in and start calling them that too.

But to the original poster the answer is make-freeze-boil. Do not have to defrost either. Just make sure they do not stick together when you freeze them.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:19 PM   #8
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:21 PM   #9
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Two friends of mine and I typically get together in November and make 30-33 dozen perogies. The "chief" perogie maker has us boil them (1 doz at a time), for a minute, drain, toss in a stainless bowl with 1 tsp of butter, and then package in a zippie, lay them flat (in the zippie) on a cookie sheet, flash freeze. The butter keeps them from sticking and when you thaw them (10 minutes in the microwave on defrost setting), you can pan fry them for about 4-5 minutes (in butter, naturally) on each side on medium to medium high. I usually start sweating the onions when the perogies go in the microwave.
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:08 PM   #10
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I think I mentioned that ones already, but my mom and I made 1000 pierogies for a party, and wouldn't you know they were all gone. Took us a little while. I think like 3 days. And we made them all first and froze, and cooked right before the party. I don't think there is a wrong way to do it.
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:13 PM   #11
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The wrong way consists in a wrong molding. This is very responsible work. They shouldn't be collapsed at cooking. Any holes and cracksare unacceptably/
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:22 PM   #12
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The wrong way consists in a wrong molding. This is very responsible work. They shouldn't be collapsed at cooking. Any holes and cracksare unacceptably/
There is definitely an "art" to shaping (molding) them. Having an experienced person teach you how to do so helps! I can always tell when a "newbie" has helped -- the shape is "off" <g>.
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:23 PM   #13
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Yea. Especially if you do vareniki (with a cherry for example) with Curley edge
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:09 PM   #14
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Well, I was talking about freezing them before or after cooking, not shaping them, but who counts, right?
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:03 PM   #15
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Ok...this is something I have never had. I am not sure what goes into them, how they are served, etc. I have seen them in the frozen food section. Which brands are good? Will my picky eaters like them??
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:31 AM   #16
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Ok...this is something I have never had. I am not sure what goes into them, how they are served, etc. I have seen them in the frozen food section. Which brands are good? Will my picky eaters like them??
I don't know about the ones in the frozen food section, but we make either potato-cheese-bacon filling or sauerkraut filling. I don't like the fruit (dessert) ones--I bought those once that were in the frozen food section. The ones we make are wonderful--I like them with fried onions, pork chops/sausage/bacon, sour cream...how much more Scandinavian could I get. They are not one of the foods in my background, but I love making them and eating them, thanks to a friend who lived in SK and MB and learned to make them along the way and has since taught me how to make them. Do your picky eaters like potatoes-cheese-bacon and pasta? If yes, I can't imagine they won't like them. One of the Best of Bridge cookbooks has a perogie casserole dish that is very good.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:13 AM   #17
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I always freeze them 1st then, boil and fry.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:19 AM   #18
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I always freeze them 1st then, boil and fry.
We have a very large Polish comunity in Chelsea. One of our local TV stations did a piece on them. They were making perogies for a community festival. All the woman were sitting at a table making them with potato/cheese filliing and then they were frozen to be cooked during the festival the following week. They will float to the top when done. Perogies are the Polish version of the Italian handmade ravioli. Every nationality has their own version and filling.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:29 PM   #19
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The only filling that I nearly hate is potato-cheese kind. Though I love the potato ones, and I love the cheese one. Together somehow the taste robs me in the wrong way.

Most of all I like meat filling. And as far as dessert kind tart cheries.
As to question cabout picky eaters, what's not to like piece of dough with any kind of filling you like.You know like those pizza pockets.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:39 PM   #20
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I've just taken some potato/onion ones out of the storebought bag they came frozen in. Directions tell me to put them into boiling water, stir a bit so they won't stick together and simmer for 6-7 minutes then drain. I sometimes fry them after with green pepper and mushrooms....deelish!!!!
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