"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-07-2006, 10:07 PM   #41
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 61
Yes I know I have to eat a variety. I also bought whole grain pasta, and i drink jamba juice everymorning (the drink contains tons of blueberries) but the point is that i have TO STOP EATING OUT, and learn how to make food for myself. Thats why im trying to estimate the cost of how I should eat sushi, and other things. I have to spend around $20-40 for the INITIAL shushi equipment, then i have to spend another $20-50 on the ingrediants that wont last very long. Part of getting more muscular is to PLAN or have a blue print of what your going to eat, when your going to eat, and how much u are going to spend on it thats why i am asking detailed questions
Buffwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 10:58 PM   #42
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
I especially get a kick out of the pretend tofu-meats that are loaded with junk. But it's not meat!
the best is the tofu "hot dogs"!! do they have tofu "spam" yet??
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2006, 11:01 PM   #43
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffwannabe
Yes I know I have to eat a variety. I also bought whole grain pasta, and i drink jamba juice everymorning (the drink contains tons of blueberries) but the point is that i have TO STOP EATING OUT, and learn how to make food for myself. Thats why im trying to estimate the cost of how I should eat sushi, and other things. I have to spend around $20-40 for the INITIAL shushi equipment, then i have to spend another $20-50 on the ingrediants that wont last very long. Part of getting more muscular is to PLAN or have a blue print of what your going to eat, when your going to eat, and how much u are going to spend on it thats why i am asking detailed questions
your most expensive items will be your "proteins" - find non-meat inexpensive protein sources like legumes (blackbeans, chickpeas) to complement your meat proteins

also found this while reading another post:

"Eggs are one of today's best food buys. A dozen Large eggs weighs 1 ½ pounds so at 90¢ a dozen, eggs are only 60¢ per pound. Eggs supply high-quality protein and a variety of important vitamins and minerals at a very low price." (http://aeb.org/LearnMore/Faqs.htm#faq4)
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 11:39 AM   #44
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Kitchenelf - Sorry. If it makes you feel any better, I have an addiction to Hot Tamale Candies from Just Born...
-----
Seven S - Yup, tofu dogs. Or how about tofurkey?

Have you ever heard Lewis Black's skit about Soy? He starts yelling about Soy Milk, and how theres no such thing because Soy Beans don't have breasts. He says it's "Soy Juice", but no one would ever buy anything labeled "Soy Juice"!
-----
Good fish is expensive. Not only that, but the yield is nowhere near 100% after it's trimmed & blocked. Eat lots of tofu which will bring the costs down, and then just have fish once a day. For breakfast/lunch you could have a good n'hearty miso soup chocked with tofu. I'd get kinda bored with it after about a week though.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 04:21 PM   #45
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 61
Is salmon as expensive as tuna? and for sushi do i need to buy smoked salmon or raw fresh salmon. i dont know the difference.
Buffwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 04:36 PM   #46
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Fresh tuna usually, around here, runs about $7.99 a pound (this is the sashimi grade) and the salmon runs $10.99 per pound to $13.99 per pound depending on farm-raised versus wild. The wild salmon does have a distinct, for lack of a better term but it still fits the bill, gamey taste but still good. I prefer farm-raised.

I like smoked salmon for bagels and cream cheese but not in my sushi, though plenty of people do like it. I have to have that raw taste to be satisfied. The smoked salmon is cured so technically it is cooked.

The best way for you to check prices is the same way I just did. Find a grocery store online that lets you shop then check prices. I don't know where you live so I can't help with a grocery store suggestion.

Every now and then sashimi grade salmon will be on sale for $2.99 per pound. I still don't buy a lot of it and freeze though as the texture does change. I have, however, asked if they had any still frozen and have bought that way, versus re-freezing.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 04:41 PM   #47
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Actually, Sush is a really nice guy, and you shouldn't worry about that Deadly in front of his name. I think he is really a *****cat in nature and just needs to find the right redhead to get him purring.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 04:43 PM   #48
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Actually, Sush is a really nice guy, and you shouldn't worry about that Deadly in front of his name. I think he is really a *****cat in nature and just needs to find the right redhead to get him purring.
lol - now we're really going to confuse Buff!!!!!!
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2006, 11:24 PM   #49
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 61
I bought the book "sushi for wimps" its a good book. lots of photos and illustrations. I still have yet to buy fresh tuna or salmon! lol
Gonna keep lookin for a fresh sea food market near my area

(any recommendations? i live in dupage county, illinois)

Also how the **** can you see the actual parasites in salmon?
Buffwannabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 06:47 AM   #50
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Most fresh-water parasites are microscopic. Raw freshwater fish is typically frozen to kill them before serving at most sushi bars.

Most sal****er parasites are big, such as worms that burrow through the meat that are an inch long or more. Usually the fish monger picks 'em out before putting them on ice in the case. Every once in a while you'll find one though.

Remember to buy fresh cuts of fish - not the pre sliced stuff.
-----
Kitchenelf - Interesting on the fish prices. My local supermarket has fresh yellowfin for around $10/lb, but it hasn't been trimmed/blocked and it's no where near fresh enough for my tastes. I have a Whole Foods market that I normally get my fish from where it's only a day or two out of the water at most, $13-$14/lb - but it's still just cross-cut loin quarters. So once I trim and block it I figure the actual piece used for sushi runs me around $18/lb.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 10:19 AM   #51
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
sal****er parasites are big
Nick, are you cursing again??
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 11:52 AM   #52
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffwannabe
I bought the book "sushi for wimps" its a good book. lots of photos and illustrations. I still have yet to buy fresh tuna or salmon! lol
Gonna keep lookin for a fresh sea food market near my area

(any recommendations? i live in dupage county, illinois)

Also how the **** can you see the actual parasites in salmon?
Buff, now you want us to pick a place for you to shop?????

Just ask the guy at the fish counter has the salmon or tuna ever been frozen. He's going to say yes. You are home free at that point. Buy some, make your sushi, keep track of what you spent and how much it made.

Now, if you ask us to feed you....................................

Nicholas - the sashimi grade tuna comes in these perfect chunks ready to use - so I guess really $7.99 isn't that bad, huh?
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 01:47 PM   #53
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Man, I live in the Northeast where Tuna/Swordfish/Cod/Haddock fishing is pretty big, and I can't get fresh sushi-grade tuna that cheap ever!

They sell pre-frozen blocks of trimmed "sushi-grade" yellowfin for $6/lb or so, but I'd rather just eat rice than that junk!

The only seafood I'll eat that was pre-frozen is shrimp. Unbelieveably I was served "flash-frozen" hamachi at a local sushi bar. When I'm paying $12 for six 1oz pieces of nigiri I expect uber-fresh. If I want fish-stick grade, well, I wouldn't, but if I did - I'd get a McFish Sandwich! I am not a picky person when I go out to eat, but I expect to be given fresh food - especially at a Sushi Bar! I complained to the sushi chef who replaced it with a few pieces of toro - but they didn't knock anything off my bill. So I scratched that place off my list.

Today I ate at the other sushi-bar near-by, which used to take 2nd seat - but has really kicked up their quality. Unbelieveable fish there, and the best rice around. I usually spend $20-$25/wk, so they give me a few free items too which is great. Today he gave me five thin slices of real toothfish sashimi free of charge! Very clean, excellent texture, and interesting mild flavor. I wouldn't pay what big New York Sushi Bars get for this, but it was a new food for me!

I still love good quality Hamachi... it's my fav.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 02:11 PM   #54
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
Today he gave me five thin slices of real toothfish sashimi free of charge! Very clean, excellent texture, and interesting mild flavor. I wouldn't pay what big New York Sushi Bars get for this, but it was a new food for me!
Pardon my ignorance, but what exactly is "toothfish"? Is it "Patagonian Toothfish" otherwise known as "Chilean Sea Bass"?
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 02:33 PM   #55
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Yeah, but not the fake stuff. It's caught in the uber-cold & deep waters around Antarctica (not always off the coast of Chile). That small plate of sashimi probably would go for $75 in a city. The chef told me it was "From Him". Eating there once or twice a week at $20-$25/pop, I probably spend close to a couple grand a year, so every once in a while he surprises me with stuff like this that isn't on the menu.

To be honest it wasn't earth-shattering, but it was good. I always enjoy new things (well, usually I do... ).
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 02:42 PM   #56
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,518
I am always looking for great sushi restaurants in MA. Which one (if you don't mind me asking) do you frequent most Nicholas Mosher?
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 03:33 PM   #57
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
I live at the northern tip of the Quabbin Resivoir in central Massachusetts in "The Lost Towns" (Athol). However, I grew up 1/2hr west in Greenfield where I91 intersects Rte2. Greenfield has two sushi bars (both integrated into hybrid chinese/japanese places). "The China Gourmet" is the place that has really gone downhill. "The New Fortune" has the sushi bar I've been going to for awhile now. Excellent fresh fish there. They don't always have items like Uni or Abalone, but what they do have is good, and they make great rice with a Hangari and Fan - not just a rice maker with everything dumped in for an easy one step but flawed process.

20min south of Greenfield off I91 is Northampton which has some absolutely fantastic places for grub. Cha Cha Cha's is the casual place I was talking about in another thread which features Mexican/Indian/Middle Eastern fusion cuisine. Nothing fancy, kinda cafeteria style where you grab utensils from buckets, but the food is all $5 or $6 a plate, healthy portions, and good! I like the Tandoori Chicken Salad and Fish Tacos with a side of Fresh Tortilla Chips and a few types of so-cal salsas using tropical fruits and Indian spices. It's an earthy-crunchy college town loaded with great food, theaters, music, and parks. I'd live there if my job wasn't up here in north-central mass and rent wasn't so cheap here in the Lost Towns. You can get pretty much any type of food you want. Only thing they're missing is some African cuisines (especially Ethiopian). It's really depressing we don't have any out here (that I know of that is). Boston has "The Red Sea", but thats about it that I know of.

One nice thing about having my Pilot's License is that I can pack a few people into a 172 and fly places to try out restaurants. I'm hoping to get out to Albany and up to Montreal a few times later this year. Nothing like bringing back blueberries from Maine either!
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2006, 06:34 PM   #58
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,518
Ah Northampton, I know it well. I spent many a drunken night there in my college days. I know Athol too, but don't think I have ever spent any time there. I always get a good chuckle out of the name though. If/when I am in those areas I will certainly check out The New Fortune. Sounds like a cool place!
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2006, 07:09 AM   #59
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Northampton is a great town (but the rent and taxes are up in the stratosphere there). I have to drive west about 15min to get to work, so I might move 1/2hr west back to Greenfield later this year. I'm heading back to school this spring to work on a business degree, and eventually I'll end up back at UMass after a year or so at a college in Greenfield. I figure I'll have the same drive to work (just 15min east instead of 15min west), and it will also place me about 20min from Amherst/Northampton.

Greenfield is actually coming along quite well - I'm suprised. They even have a couple Thai places now along with the usual pizza/chinese shops. Being right on Rte2/I91, you can quickly get to the Green Mountains in Vermont, Brattleboro, and west out to the Berkshires. Right now I kinda live 30-45min from anything that is remotely entertaining (which stinks).

Where did you go to school, UMass? Amherst College?
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2006, 07:15 AM   #60
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,518
I went to school at Franklin Pierce College in NH, but 100 out of 320 kids in my highschool ended up at UMass. My brother, wife, and lots of other friends were there too. I think I spend more time at UMass than my own school actually.

I now live in North Grafton (about 15 minutes east of Worcester), but I do get out to the Western part of the state every once in a while still.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.