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Old 10-24-2011, 03:53 PM   #1
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Shepherds Pie

I have a bunch of Lamb Stew I made last week..

so is this recipe essentially...

put the stew in the bottom of a casarole dish...

top with my mashed potaoes, and bake or broil 'till browned on top?

is there cheese on top or bread crumbs?

The Google Recipes are all over the place!

Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 10-24-2011, 04:38 PM   #2
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Hey, you've got the basics. There are lots of jazzed up variations, some people put cheese on top but i don't think it's traditional to add cheese

here is a link to a basic recipe
No-fuss shepherd's pie recipe - Recipes - BBC Good Food
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Old 10-24-2011, 05:09 PM   #3
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Hey, you've got the basics. There are lots of jazzed up variations, some people put cheese on top but i don't think it's traditional to add cheese

here is a link to a basic recipe
No-fuss shepherd's pie recipe - Recipes - BBC Good Food
That Shepherds Pie looks so good. Thanks for the site.
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Old 10-24-2011, 05:24 PM   #4
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I usually sprinkle a little paprika on top.
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Old 10-24-2011, 06:36 PM   #5
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I never thought of using lamb stew. Sounds brilliant. Don't put cheese on top, just a bit of butter and I think Pacanis' suggestion of a bit of paprika would look nice.

We usually add a think layer of frozen corn between the meat and the 'taters. I make the mashed potatoes with the potato cooking water instead of adding milk.
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Old 10-24-2011, 06:58 PM   #6
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My housemate from Quebec used to make this every Sunday. She'd mix in creamed corn with the meat, top the mashed potatoes with a bit of butter and sprinkle with paprika. Patois Chinois is what I believe she called it. Sometimes she'd put finely sliced jalepeno peppers in it. And, served with lots of homemade catsup.
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Old 10-25-2011, 01:13 AM   #7
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The great debate, Shepherds Pie V Cottage Pie V Cumberland pie
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Old 10-25-2011, 07:35 AM   #8
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That Shepherds Pie looks so good. Thanks for the site.
No problem, and it sounds quite simple to make which is always a bonus
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Old 10-25-2011, 04:21 PM   #9
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I never thought of using lamb stew. Sounds brilliant. Don't put cheese on top, just a bit of butter and I think Pacanis' suggestion of a bit of paprika would look nice.

We usually add a think layer of frozen corn between the meat and the 'taters. I make the mashed potatoes with the potato cooking water instead of adding milk.
How funny! I didn't realize it was a Quebecoise thing! Mom always made hers with a can of creamed corn as one of the layers. And she always topped mashed potatoes with a sprinkle of paprika "for color"! She didn't even know paprika had any flavor at all (mostly because the stuff available to her didn't) until I introduced her to the imported stuff. She used ground beef/onions/green peppers seasoned mixture as the base. Since all ingredients were already cooked and hot, it was just a pass under the broiler.
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Old 10-25-2011, 06:58 PM   #10
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How funny! I didn't realize it was a Quebecoise thing! Mom always made hers with a can of creamed corn as one of the layers. And she always topped mashed potatoes with a sprinkle of paprika "for color"! She didn't even know paprika had any flavor at all (mostly because the stuff available to her didn't) until I introduced her to the imported stuff. She used ground beef/onions/green peppers seasoned mixture as the base. Since all ingredients were already cooked and hot, it was just a pass under the broiler.
And yup, my housemate sometimes added peas. She was from Rouen, France but her father lived in Quebec City.
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Old 10-26-2011, 06:06 AM   #11
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Talk about starch overload!
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:00 AM   #12
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I don't see the "starch overload".

when you serve yourself a wedge, or a spoonful, of this pie...you get a relatively small amount of meat, potatoes and corn...I've never known anyone to eat an entire pie themselves....but maybe some people do....but that would be a "food overload" and of the 7 billion people on this planet, there are so many differences in food tolerance levels...dontcha think?
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:05 AM   #13
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I had never had shepherd's pie until after Mrs Hoot and I got together. Hers is very similar to .40's recipe. The main difference is she uses snaps rather than corn and peas in her version. I might see if I can encourage her to try the corn and/or peas. Sounds mighty good!
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Old 08-30-2012, 10:29 AM   #14
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Can we link this thread to the other one?

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ven-81442.html
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Old 08-30-2012, 10:36 AM   #15
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ATK once cooked their potatoes in the milk that was not drained but used to mash the potatoes. I have yet to try it, but it does sound reasonable. You save all the nutrients from the potatoes.

Here in New England, most folks that I have talked to use hamburg in the Shepher's Pie. I once asked someone if they ever heard of a shepherd tending his "herd of sheep." Or does a cowboy take his "flock of cattle" to market. It gave them food for thought and realized that Shepherd's Pie should be made with lamb not hamburg.
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Old 08-30-2012, 11:18 AM   #16
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I would prefer lamb...but lamb is scarce in these parts and mighty dear to boot (shoulder blade chops ain't too high when I can find 'em.) Plus, Mrs Hoot ain't very keen on eatin' the "poor baby lamb" as she puts it.
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Old 08-30-2012, 11:31 AM   #17
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I would prefer lamb...but lamb is scarce in these parts and mighty dear to boot (shoulder blade chops ain't too high when I can find 'em.) Plus, Mrs Hoot ain't very keen on eatin' the "poor baby lamb" as she puts it.
I had mutton once. Boy, that sure had some flavor but stringy. Great for stew. Every so often, we get a plethora of lamb in the stores. That is when I stock up. I cut most of it into stew pieces. The favorite dish of my family. And if they have a leg, I will buy a small one. There isn't much meat, but it is enough for a small family for a Sunday dinner of roasted lamb leg. I usually cook that first. It takes up a lot of room in the freezer. Living in an Italian and Hispanic part of town, Easter is a great time to find it. What is Easter without lamb?

My son took me to a pub in Vermont that was owned and run by two fellers from Scotland. They had standard UK fare. Including Bangers and Mashed Potatoes. I chose the Shepherd's Pie. It was delicious. But the serving was way to generous.
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:31 PM   #18
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I bought a few pounds of stewing lamb at my local butcher shop....cost $8 per pound, and much of it was fat.
I decided to grind it up to use, so I don't have to cut all the fat off each tiny stewy piece. Worked great!

How much does everyone else here pay for lamb?
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Old 08-30-2012, 07:44 PM   #19
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I bought a few pounds of stewing lamb at my local butcher shop....cost $8 per pound, and much of it was fat.
I decided to grind it up to use, so I don't have to cut all the fat off each tiny stewy piece. Worked great!

How much does everyone else here pay for lamb?
I pay about $10/kg for ground lamb and about $12/kg for shoulder chops. I seldom look at the prices of the other stuff - it's scary.
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Old 08-30-2012, 07:51 PM   #20
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Maybe the one with ground beef should be called

Pâté chinois - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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