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Old 12-26-2010, 02:30 PM   #41
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I keep in all the "juices" (I use ground meat that is lean, so the juices aren't just fat), then use instant mashed potatoes as the binder. It's a shortcut, but tastes good and keeps the slices looking like slices.


That's a wonderful idea. Thanks.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:37 PM   #42
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That's funny! Most old-fashioned tastes good!
True, but over cooked vegis comes to mind.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:42 PM   #43
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True, but over cooked vegis comes to mind.
Yes, but I am thinking of all the wonderful things my Great-Grandmother cooked that I would never eat now because of salt and fat content. I believe it's our duty to continue the Traditions...but use our brains to make them more healthy.

I didn't use to feel guilty using a stick of butter to create a dish, now I have second thoughts and use part butter and part veg oil. The flavor is still there. Favorite veg dishes are re-created with steamed veg with the same sauces. etc.
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:47 PM   #44
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My mom was (is, she's still kicking and cooking) a great cook. Because of budgetary restraints, she used either corn oil or margarine. I, too mostly use a combo. If I want butter taste, I'll heat a pool of olive oil, then put a dab of butter in it. I get some butter flavor, without the heaviness. Obviously this depends upon what cuisine I'm cooking.
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Old 12-26-2010, 05:27 PM   #45
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Actually, one time I said "kwuh-bek" to my friend's French (as in France-French, not Canadienne French) mother. She took me to task. "Claire, you can say that better, I know you can!!!" Ugh! I just laughed and corrected myself! DO any of you ever take to pronouncing something incorrectly just because you want to make yourself understood? Or, in some cases, if you say it correctly, people think you're putting on airs? I know my parents will pronounce certain words if they're speaking in French differently than they will if they're speaking to people who are not of Canuck background. In other words, "Kwebeck" if they're speaking to someone who speaks only American English, but "Kebeck" if it is a relative.
When I was in the Navy, about a million years ago, I learned to say "Key-beck". But when I read the word silently it's always Kwa-beck. Go figure.
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Old 12-26-2010, 08:24 PM   #46
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They wear chooks in Quebec.
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Old 12-26-2010, 08:29 PM   #47
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They wear chooks in Quebec.
They wear chickens?
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Old 12-26-2010, 08:38 PM   #48
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They wear chickens?
lol

I mean Tukes. In this part of the Valley, the slang is pronounced Chook.
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Old 12-26-2010, 08:43 PM   #49
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lol

I mean Tukes. In this part of the Valley, the slang is pronounced Chook.
At least I knew a Chook was a chicken...
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Old 12-26-2010, 11:50 PM   #50
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Just goes to show you how regional language can be. I've never heard of that as a chicken. But Daddy always wore a toque (we pronounced took), a knit hat. Chicken? I'm missing something! How fun, though.
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Old 12-27-2010, 12:20 AM   #51
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lol, boy, this thread has coitanly taken off, and i love it. like claire, i'm interested in the etymology of words, and cultural influences on slang.
i'm not so interested in getting it right, not in a temporally colloquial sense. i don't have much to say that matters in those (or many, lol) cases, but it's fun to listen and absorb.
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:00 AM   #52
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Just goes to show you how regional language can be. I've never heard of that as a chicken. But Daddy always wore a toque (we pronounced took), a knit hat. Chicken? I'm missing something! How fun, though.
Actually it's Australian slang for chicken. see: World Wide Words: Chook
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:41 PM   #53
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I think if such a road was open to me as a young person, I'd be an etymologist. As it is, about 10 years ago I met a woman who was legally blind, and getting worst by the minute. Since I'd had some serious vision problems, I asked her if I could read to her. It took her a year or so, but then she realized there was much she wanted to read that wasn't on "books on tape" and she didn't like that anyway. So I started reading to her a couple of times a week. Often more conversation about what we're reading than reading by itself. But mostly we discovered this common love of words. What does this mean, where did it come from?

Have you ever read a book called, I think, The Story of English? I can go up and find the author, and I think it was a PBS series. But someone will google or wiki it before I can walk up the stairs and back down!
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:47 PM   #54
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Actually, I Amazoned it! LOL Amazon.com: The Story of English: Revised Edition (9780140154054): Robert McCrum, William Cran, Robert MacNeil: Books

Not done for a Kindle...there are still books in paper, yea!
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:08 PM   #55
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I am from the Ottawa Valley. It is a mainly rural region Northwest of our capital. The people here are known for their heavy accent and dialect. And we all have chimleys on our house to vent the furnace...I have lived many places, but always seem to fall back into the valley accent whenever I come back.
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:54 PM   #56
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I love Quebec English. We don't go to the convenience store, we go to the dep. It's short for dépanneur, which is the French word for convenience store. We don't ride the subway, we take the Métro. We don't have electricity, we have Hydro (short for the name of our electricity company, Hydro Québec). When the power goes out, we have a panne.
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Old 12-27-2010, 10:57 PM   #57
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I have always been interested in knowing which parts of the country call a bar a beer garden. I know that they call it that in some parts of Michigan and Wisconsin. Anywhere else?
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Old 12-28-2010, 01:58 AM   #58
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you can grow beer in a garden???

oh man, i've totally been ordering from the wrong seed catalogues...
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:14 AM   #59
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I have always been interested in knowing which parts of the country call a bar a beer garden. I know that they call it that in some parts of Michigan and Wisconsin. Anywhere else?
We have beer gardens at special events like a fair, or a festival. They are usually under tents or in auditoriums at fair grounds or sports arenas where the event is occuring.
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:12 AM   #60
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That makes perfect sense to me since you are right across the lakes from Michigan. Howdy neighbor.
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