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Old 05-08-2009, 06:29 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellakav View Post
well, it's not really unleavened...it uses roughly a T. of yeast.
the closest I have to unleavened is a sourdough potato bread
recipe, which is also good.
No worries. I just thought all peasant breads were unleavened. See what I don't know? hahaha

I love to bake bread. The smells throughout the house drives everyone mad. I make all kinds. Any recipies you would want to share would be appreciated.

Baking sourdough bread is my absolute favorite, with sourdough rye being tops on my list. I use a combination of dark and light rye. I will have to put that up, too, but it would not be appropriate on this thread.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:41 PM   #22
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Hello and Welcome!

The first thing I thought of was cabbage rolls, but don't know if that's something you eat in Hungary.
Is Moravia in your general area? I have an older friend who is of Moravian descent, and one of her husband's fave dishes was sweet peppers, leeks, and a little garlic, sauteed together in olive oil. You eat that with crusty bread, to soak up the juices.
I have added anchovies to that.
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Old 05-09-2009, 06:40 AM   #23
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Hey hello again! I'm glad that I found so many ppl interested in the topic! :)

Martin! I'm sorry, but I don't have any recipes for bread, but I can check Hungarian sites and books for the recipe and translate! Just let me know, if u need it! Baking a bread with Garlic is not a bad idea, anyway! :)
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Old 05-09-2009, 06:47 AM   #24
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Hello and Welcome!

The first thing I thought of was cabbage rolls, but don't know if that's something you eat in Hungary.
Is Moravia in your general area? I have an older friend who is of Moravian descent, and one of her husband's fave dishes was sweet peppers, leeks, and a little garlic, sauteed together in olive oil. You eat that with crusty bread, to soak up the juices.
I have added anchovies to that.
If u meant cabbage rolls stuffed with some meat, than yes, it's a Hungarian food.

Moravia is not part of Hungary. After checking wikipedia, I got to know, that it's part of the Czech Republic. So it's not that far away, as it's still central Europe. :) That food you mentioned sounds interesting though. It could be a good starter for a dinner on Sunday! :)
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Old 05-09-2009, 06:55 AM   #25
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There was a time when the Czechs and the Slovenskos were ruled by Hungary.
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Old 05-09-2009, 07:11 AM   #26
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Cold cherry soup comes to mind Kranne. I've tried several of the other dishes that have been mentioned. Spatzle I think is the German name for the noodle concept. I spread the dough on the back of a cookie baking pan and then scrape off bits into boiling water - a few at a time. I especially like them with goulash.

Of course there are the pastries!! :) Oh yes, the fruit or nut filled pastries. Good recipes have no borders! with the internet and places such as discuss cooking I can find wonderful recipes from everywhere!

I must learn about the paprika you mentioned. I have what the container says is Hungarian Paprika but I'm not certain that it is the same. Thanks for asking and be ready to share a recipe or two!

Certainly there are Hungarians here - I well remember when the Soviet tanks rolled into your city to crush the rebellion. Yes, you are here, we are you and you are in us like it or not! :)
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Old 05-09-2009, 07:44 AM   #27
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Kranne, does Dobos Torta mean anything to you. Please understand - I am not really a baker and my name should not be mentioned beside his. My Dobos Torte is not beautiful but it is a treat!

Have you ever checked into facebook.com? If you do please look me up. I am the David Cottrell living in Norwalk, Ohio USA. Right now my little photo is the same as I am using here - a Ukrainian and American flag together. No - not any Ukrainian in me other than what ever comes from being born here. Of course in Eastern Hungary there are Ukrainian and Hungarian populations mixed together I guess. Food mixes together. Everyone claims the best as their own! :))
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Old 05-09-2009, 09:05 AM   #28
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Cold cherry soup: Of course I know it! Try to make it from apple or both! It's very good, especially on hot summer days!

By pastries u mean dumplings made of boiled potato and flour and the rest with some fruit in the middle? That's the favorite food of many hungarian children! :)

And of course, dobos torta is also a great food. To be honest, I've never been brave enough to try and bake one! I always buy it in the cake-shop.

About hungarian paprika: it looks like this:


Yes I'm on facebook, I'll check u!
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Old 05-09-2009, 09:11 AM   #29
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Quote:
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No worries. I just thought all peasant breads were unleavened. See what I don't know? hahaha

I love to bake bread. The smells throughout the house drives everyone mad. I make all kinds. Any recipies you would want to share would be appreciated.

Baking sourdough bread is my absolute favorite, with sourdough rye being tops on my list. I use a combination of dark and light rye. I will have to put that up, too, but it would not be appropriate on this thread.

pretty much all of my bread recipes have some kind of leavening in
them, but I do have a couple without it. I will PM you the recipe I
have, and a sourdough potato recipe as well. I know what you mean
about baking bread - it is just the best smell. especially on a cold
winter afternoon out here, along side a big pot of soup or stew.
it's the only thing about winter I will miss this year! somehow, the
smell of the bread just isn't the same with the a/c on!
I'll post those up later today - right now I have to go catch up on
laundry!
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Old 05-09-2009, 09:17 AM   #30
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Some 5 years ago we bought a few pounds of paprika from Otto's because the price seemed reasonable. However, to us, it seemed flat tasting as if it was cut with flour.
Really? I've always been pretty happy with them, especially with
the spicy and I don't always do spicy well! Anything is possible,
though. I imagine a lot of places cut their spices with flour or
cornstarch to save a buck! I just started using them because
they were recommended to me and Hungarian paprika is pretty
much unheard of where I live. the stuff you buy in the stores
here is crap. like rust colored sand.
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Old 05-09-2009, 11:53 AM   #31
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Sauerkraut Soup

4 smoked ham hocks or smoked pork knuckles
1 ring smoked kielbasa
1 lb. sauerkraut - rinsed
1/2 oz. dried mushrooms
1 (15 oz) can red kidney beans
10 c. water
2 Tbls. Flour and Crisco (vegetable shortening)
Hungarian paprika, salt and ground pepper to taste

Place hocks in water and bring to boil. Add mushrooms, kielbasa and beans. Simmer 1 hour. Add sauerkraut and cook for 1/2 hour.
Brown flour in melted Crisco and add 1/2 c. water, mix well. Simmer till well blended and then add to soup.
Turn off and let stand. Remove kielbasa and hocks. Cut kielbasa into rounds, remove meat from hocks and add back to soup.


Stuffed Cabbage

1 pound ground beef
1 pound ground pork
2 rings smoked kielbasa - 1 ring chopped small for filling, 1 ring sliced into rounds for layers.
1 lg. onion - chopped fine
3 lg. cloves garlic - chopped fine
2 Tbls. Hungarian paprika - or to taste
1 Tbls. Dry parsley
1 Tbls. salt
1 Tbls. Ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. MSG (optional)
2 lg. cans Sacramento tomato juice
2 lg. bags sauerkraut, save juice
2 lg. heads cabbage


Par cooked rice - 3/4 c. rice, 1 c. water and 1/2 tsp. salt - mix together, bring to boil. Turn off, cover and let sit while you prep the rest.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.

Core head of cabbage, place in boiling water and ladle water into core. BE VERY CAREFUL! Remove leaves as they separate and plunge into large bowl of ice and water. Save small center leaves. Drain leaves and remove center ribs from leaves. Chop ribs and small center leaves.

Make layers: Layer some of the sauerkraut, then a layer of chopped cabbage ribs and leaves and then a layer of sliced kielbasa rounds in bottom of lg. Dutch oven (or 2). (if you have any filling left over from the leaves layer it with the kraut and kielbasa layers)

Mix beef, pork, spices, 1 ring kielbasa (chopped small), onion, garlic and rice (save any liquid). Mix well.

Lightly pack a small handful of the meat mixture and place in the center of a cabbage leaf. Fold top part of leaf over mixture, then fold in the sides and roll until mixture is completely encased. Lay rolls on top of sauerkraut and sliced kielbasa layers in pot. Repeat the layers and rolls till pot is almost full. Ending with a kielbasa layer. Fill pot with the kraut juice and tomato juice (and any rice liquid).

Cover pot and simmer 1 - 1 1/2 hours or until filling is completely cooked. Add more tomato juice if needed.
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Old 05-09-2009, 08:46 PM   #32
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kranne, when I mentioned Hungarian Pastries I was thinking of those big nut rolls. Most excellent! Of course there are too many others to think about. Thanks for looking me up so soon on facebook - good to meet you! David
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Old 05-11-2009, 05:57 PM   #33
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Quote:
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spaetzle: I thought it's something I don't know... it turned out that I do. I haven't heard this name yet. I thought their english name is noodles. :)
I'm still looking for what u mean with weinkraut. :)
and how did u get to know Hungarian food? do u have some acquaintances or relatives, or travelled somewhere to europe or how?
I checked the site, thanks... I haven't thought that there's such a site like that. I was amazed. :)
Weinkraut= feherboros izesitessel=Savanyitott kaposzta
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Old 05-11-2009, 10:51 PM   #34
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Weinkraut= feherboros izesitessel=Savanyitott kaposzta
Ooppss, are we supposed to us an online translator to figure out what this means. It is in Hungarian, at least, isn't it?
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:29 AM   #35
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msfot, I had to laugh .... I make cabbage rolls once every winter, and it is pretty much as you describe. My recipe is from Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Slovak, and other eastern European women, which I just cook from memory. My mother in law taught me to core the head of cabbage, then spear it with a huge fork. Boil the cabbage until the leaves are pliable and tear off easily. THEN, the trick that really helps, "shave" the spine of the leaf of cabbage. That way it rolls much more easily. I use V8 vegetable juice because Sacramento isn't available here, but I agree with you that it is best. I recently made this for a dinner party and was surprised at how much people loved it. Good quality paprika is the real trick to this meal. I live in a small midwestern town, and get frustrated at times when I can't find just what I want. But I've got a "spice guy" who can get me both hot and sweet paprika. Oh, by the way, I don't precook the rice, just put it in raw. The slow cooking actually makes it so that the rice absorbes the flavor of the sauce I cook it in.
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Old 05-19-2009, 02:44 PM   #36
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Okay, "justplainbill" doesn't want to translate. So this American Hunky will have to wonder why. But Cabbage Rolls are another thing. They are kind of like hamburgers in my family: you can fill them with anything you want and they will probably be great. And you don't always have to cover them with tomatoes.
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Old 05-19-2009, 04:03 PM   #37
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Okay, "justplainbill" doesn't want to translate. So this American Hunky will have to wonder why. But Cabbage Rolls are another thing. They are kind of like hamburgers in my family: you can fill them with anything you want and they will probably be great. And you don't always have to cover them with tomatoes.
See
Ferihegy Kft.

PS = sorta means translates to
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:58 PM   #38
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msfot, I had to laugh .... I make cabbage rolls once every winter, and it is pretty much as you describe. My recipe is from Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Slovak, and other eastern European women, which I just cook from memory. My mother in law taught me to core the head of cabbage, then spear it with a huge fork. Boil the cabbage until the leaves are pliable and tear off easily. THEN, the trick that really helps, "shave" the spine of the leaf of cabbage. That way it rolls much more easily. I use V8 vegetable juice because Sacramento isn't available here, but I agree with you that it is best. I recently made this for a dinner party and was surprised at how much people loved it. Good quality paprika is the real trick to this meal. I live in a small midwestern town, and get frustrated at times when I can't find just what I want. But I've got a "spice guy" who can get me both hot and sweet paprika. Oh, by the way, I don't precook the rice, just put it in raw. The slow cooking actually makes it so that the rice absorbes the flavor of the sauce I cook it in.
hello. what made you laugh? btw both of those recipes are from my aunt's hungarian mil. i used to call my aunt's husband "uncle hunky" because i have 2 uncles and to cousins with the same name. the original recipe calls for uncooked rice but my mom would parcook the rice to speed the cooking and it still absorbs the tomato juice and i have "sauce" to pour over the rolls which i love!!
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