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Old 02-13-2006, 06:58 AM   #1
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Baked eggs

here's how one of my books says to do them:
brush a ramekin with melted butter, line it with a slice of ham, crack 2 eggs on top, add salt/pepper, bake @ 325 until the eggs start to set up (~10mins according to the book), take them out of the oven, add a drop of cream & sprinkle grated cheese on top. put back in the oven until the eggs are done.

here's how i did them, since i didn't have any ham or a proper ramekin:
1/2 cook ~5 slices of bacon, line a plain old cereal bowl with the bacon slices, put 3 eggs on top, s/p, bake until eggs start to set up... etc etc. it took longer with 3 eggs because there's more to heat up i guess (~15mins for the 1st part) i used cheddar cause that's what i had; the book said use swiss. pretty easy, but one thing i found difficult with this was figuring out when the eggs are done because the cheese is on top.

edit: my book also says that chef's hats have 101 pleats on them because there are 101 ways to prepare eggs. did anyone else know that?

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Old 02-13-2006, 07:16 AM   #2
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See, ya learn something everyday. Never knew that about the chef's hat. Never tried or thought of baked aggs, will give it a try. thanks.
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Old 02-13-2006, 09:19 AM   #3
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This recipe also works great with bacon strips wrapped into your muffin tin, then place one or two eggs(depending on size)into the tin. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 10 minutes, remove and add a light sprinkling of fried onion and garlic. Toss on a small handful of grated Parmesan and return to cook for 10 minutes.

Excellent served with hot baking powder biscuits. ; )
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Old 02-13-2006, 09:33 AM   #4
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Doesn't the bacon make it greasy?
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Old 02-13-2006, 09:39 AM   #5
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No, but then I buy premium bacon as we only eat it once or twice a year. We are stationed in England so we are enjoying gammon, rashers, sausages, lots of excellent lamb, seafood(fish 'n chips), donner kebaps, Indian Curries, etc....
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Old 02-13-2006, 02:55 PM   #6
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I knew that the pleats are thought to represent the number of ways one can cook can egg but as to the number of pleats being 101 that I didn't know.

I do the same sort of thing in a small souffle/ramekin. I line the lightly greased container with a touch of olive oil then line the sides with pancetta (its easier than bacon because it is cut that much thinner and of course it adds that distinctive taste). I then fill the casing with soft scrambled eggs (cook scrambled eggs until still wobbly, flavour however you want to) and then seal in the top with more slices of pancetta. Bake until the pancetta is crisp.

If your using a small dish it looks great served on top of an english muffin.
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:12 PM   #7
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baking eggs,very interesting...
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:13 PM   #8
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I think we can easily find more than 101 ways to cook an egg at this point of time.
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Old 02-13-2006, 09:10 PM   #9
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Lets not open that can of worms Kleenex, the thread will never end.
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Old 02-14-2006, 11:41 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Doesn't the bacon make it greasy?
depends on how much you cook the bacon befor lining the ramekin with it. if you cook so it's almost done, not much grease will come off. if you don't cook the bacon enough then your eggs, etc will be sitting in a small puddle of bacon grease. i did that one time & just poured off the grease because i didn't mind much (pork fat rules, as emeril says ). the book said brush lightly with melted butter so that's why i guessed that using 1/2-cooked bacon works well enough for me.
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Old 02-22-2006, 06:32 PM   #11
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I make them for brunch alot ,spray muffin tin line with thin sliced black forest ham add one egg to each tin bake at 400 about 15 minutes where it just setting up I take them and put them on a platter and put hollandaise on top.
You can also put a little mushroom or spinach on the ham before you add egg.
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Old 02-22-2006, 06:49 PM   #12
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Eggs en cocotte

I love them! I have some Royal Worcester Cocotte containers (aka English egg coddlers - see here for an illustration http://www.chinaetc.co.uk/RoyalWorce...s/coddlers.asp ) which produce heavenly results every time.

This is a variation from Rick Stein's cookery book.

25g/1oz butter
1 small onion, finely chopped
225g/8oz button mushrooms, finely chopped
leaves from 1 sprig of thyme
freshly grated nutmeg
6 large eggs
6 tsp double cream
40g/1½oz Gruyére cheese, finely grated
salt
freshly ground black pepper

For the herb salad and lemon oil dressing,
handful of baby leaf salad
sprigs of flat-leaf parsley, tarragon, chervil, chives, fennel and dill
lemon olive oil or extra virgin olive oil
salt

Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6. Melt the butter in a medium-sized pan, add the onion and cook gently until soft but not coloured.
Add the mushrooms and thyme and continue to cook until all the excess liquid has evaporated and the mixture is quite dry. Season to taste with salt, pepper and nutmeg.
Spoon the mushroom mixture into six lightly buttered ramekin dishes or cocottes. Break in the eggs, season them lightly, then spoon over the cream and sprinkle with the Gruyére cheese.
Put the ramekins into a shallow roasting tin and pour some hot water around them so that it comes about half way up the sides of the dishes. Bake for 15 minutes until the eggs are set but the yolks are still runny and the cheese is lightly golden.
5. Serve with a mixture of seasoned baby salad leaves and herbs, dressed in lemon olive oil or extra virgin olive oil.
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Old 02-22-2006, 07:33 PM   #13
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Ishbel, I've never baked eggs, but, after seeing the beautiful coddlers and reading your recipe, I've got to try them..If I didn't look like I'd just wrestled a moose, I'd go shopping right now. Thank you..This is a next week for sure to make for me.

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Old 02-23-2006, 03:54 AM   #14
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Coddled eggs are a real 'comfort' food for my family when someone is feeling under the weather!
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Old 02-23-2006, 07:19 AM   #15
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for baked eggs i found the best way it not to try and cook the eggs from raw in the ramakin i think the eggs take too long and go rubbery. i found that doing a par-cooked still wet scrambed egg mix and then folding some pecorino though then topping the ingredients in the ramkins and then grill.
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Old 02-23-2006, 08:36 AM   #16
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try baking an egg in a potato skin! wonderful. get the skin with a pat of butter hot in the ramekin, then break the egg into it, salt and pepper, and return to oven. serve when the white is set but the yolk still soft. 5-8 minutes usually. top with fresh parsley or chives. really good.
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Old 04-02-2006, 10:27 AM   #17
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Baked eggs sound really good. I'll have to try this soon. I like the idea of baking them in a potatoe skin especially, but the eggs with ham sounds fantastic too.
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Old 04-02-2006, 11:15 AM   #18
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Thank you for bringing that up.

Am a real Nero Wolfe fan and learned about baked eggs there. Even have the cookbook, which I cannot find at the moment (there, I swear, is a gremlin about who selectively hides things we want at any moment. Or maybe it is just we have too much stuff. Nah, it is the gremlin.).

But have never made them. They sure sound good.

Am a bit confused about the potato skins though.

Are these skins of baked potatoes?

If so, or I guess if not, could one just take a shelled out baked potato skin and make the baked eggs using the potato shell as a vessel?

If so, I wonder if one could put on all kinds of toppings?

Sorry for the silly questions.

I just got a bug and am not thinking too clearly.
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Old 04-03-2006, 06:46 AM   #19
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Auntdot, I assume it is a baked potatoe skin. I'm microwaving a potatoe right now, then gonna hull it out and stuff it with ham, sauteed mushrooms and scallion, and then add the egg.
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Old 04-03-2006, 07:44 AM   #20
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I wish I could enjoy baked eggs, but unfortunately I'm one of those folks who need their eggs cooked to the consistency of hockey pucks. I just can't deal with the texture of soft undercooked eggs.

When I make what's normally a "baked egg" dish, I normally cook the eggs (well, at least my eggs) separately & then just add them to the rest of the dish.
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