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Old 07-24-2006, 03:01 PM   #1
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Difference between salted and unsalted butter (besides the salt...)?

i'm wondering if there is any major difference between salted and unsalted butter, besides the fact that one has salt and the other doesn't i assume. is one better for baking vs baking, different taste, ect? or does it not really matter which i buy? thanks, katie.

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Old 07-24-2006, 03:09 PM   #2
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Butter has traditionally been salted to help preserve it. Besides the baking issue, any cooking you do with butter will be affected by the salt in the salted butter. Unsalted butter will be fresher than salted. It's all that I buy.
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:15 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaCook
Unsalted butter will be fresher than salted.
Why do you say that?
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:33 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by jennyema
Why do you say that?
Probably because the salt preserves the product, therefore allowing your grocer to keep it on the shelf for a longer period of time, or something like that.
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:35 PM   #5
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it is easier to taste the rancidity in unsalted butter. Using such, (sweet butter) it is also easier to regulate how much salt you are using. And of course some recipes want sweet butter...but if you don't use much butter, and it sits around a while, better to buy salted.
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:49 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
Probably because the salt preserves the product, therefore allowing your grocer to keep it on the shelf for a longer period of time, or something like that.
But unsalted butter isn't always fresher than salted. It depends on the date of manufacture, which is usually on the box.
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
But unsalted butter isn't always fresher than salted. It depends on the date of manufacture, which is usually on the box.
I guess my powers of deductive reasoning are a bit rusty. Carry on!
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Old 07-24-2006, 03:52 PM   #8
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I never buy salted butter, either. The pure taste of the butter is so much better w/o the salt.

It never lasts long enough around our house to go rancid.
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:03 PM   #9
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I use unsalted butter for baking and cooking, but salted butter to spread on bread, scones, etc. The salted butter I use is Bridel, a French butter which has small grains of sea salt in the butter. Great for sandwiches and on toast.
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:06 PM   #10
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I can't think of many things that salt and butter won't improve at least a bit (OK, maybe not ice cream and strawberries). I usually use unsalted for everything and add salt/other stuff to make a compound butter when I want another flavor...........
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:10 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
I use unsalted butter for baking and cooking, but salted butter to spread on bread, scones, etc. The salted butter I use is Bridel, a French butter which has small grains of sea salt in the butter. Great for sandwiches and on toast.

I was just thinking the same thing! I try to keep some salted Lurpak or Plugra in the freezer for spreading. Salt really helps to bring out the flavor (as it does in most things, IMO).
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:11 PM   #12
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I use whipped salted butter at the table and mostly unsalted for baking. I keep a good bit in the freezer most of the time.
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:23 PM   #13
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I've learned the value of unsalted butter. I have a simple fettuccini alfredo recipe that calls for butter and salt. The first time I made it, I used salted butter, and salt. Result: too salty. Now I am trying to educate Mrs. Big Dog on the difference between salted & unsalted. Not going well so far . . . .
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
I was just thinking the same thing! I try to keep some salted Lurpak or Plugra in the freezer for spreading. Salt really helps to bring out the flavor (as it does in most things, IMO).
I've always got a half-pound of Lurpak in the freezer, too - I find the Bridel doesn't freeze quite so well, I think it's probably the coarse sea-salt grains.
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Old 07-24-2006, 04:49 PM   #15
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I also use unsalted most of the time. I heard many people say it wouldn't alter the flavour of your food if you use salted butter in your cooking/baking, but personally I disagree with this, especially if you are making something sweet, and even if you are making a savoury dish, the rich creamy flavour of butter is much better showcased when you use the unsalted version, or at least it seems to me this way.
Lurpak is also my favourite, along with various fresh products from Trentino region, salted or unsalted. I do also enjoy Lurpak's lightly salted version on my toasted bread now and then.
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Old 07-24-2006, 05:00 PM   #16
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http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...nsalted+butter

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...nsalted+butter
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Old 07-24-2006, 08:14 PM   #17
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cool, thanks for the info. i usually have been buying the unsalted butter. i wanted to try the costco brand and see how it is, but they only have salted butter. guess i'll stick with the grocery store for that then, unless they suddenly start carrying it again.
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Old 07-24-2006, 08:31 PM   #18
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Costco has both salted and unsalted butter. At least the ones I visit do.

I use mostly salted. The unsalted goes mostly for dessert recipes which specifically call for unsalted and for sauces.
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Old 07-25-2006, 11:26 AM   #19
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Years ago, before manufacturers were required to post expiration dates & were held to higher standards, etc., etc., lower quality butter "could" be masked somewhat via the salted product.

These days, however, I think it's more a matter of personal preference &/or what a particular recipe specifies.
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Old 07-27-2006, 09:45 AM   #20
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I usually use salted butter, but have a couple of packets of unsalted in the freezer just in case. I went through a phase when everything I was baking (and baking is relly the main thing I use butter for) was asking for unsalted butter and a pinch of salt. Because salted butter is a couple of pence cheaper I experimented using salted butter and no salt, the result was ok, but now I use salted butter and the teeniest pinch of salt and its perfect. Obviously I have to hve unsalted butter to hand for anything more delicate but I find most things handle salted butter.

BTW I know its only a matter of a couple of pence, but I am amazingly stingy sometimes!
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