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Old 09-10-2019, 12:26 PM   #41
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:28 PM   #42
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I've seen that, too, but never tried it. It is pretty rare that I make a fried egg. If I want a runny egg to put on top of something, I prefer a poached egg.

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I always do that when I fry eggs. I do that when I make pan-fried walleye, too.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:31 PM   #43
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One of the hardest photoshoots, when I worked with the food photographer, was poaching the yolk of an egg to put on top of a piece of fish. I practiced the day before, nailed it. It took 9 yolks to get it perfect for the photos the next day. Poaching an egg I can do, but poaching a yolk, that was hard. Good thing I was using the girls' eggs, had plenty yolks. The only thing that was harder to do with eggs, was poaching a quail's egg in the shell.
Basically the quails' eggs were soft-boiled. The tricky part was getting the eggs out of the shell without breaking the white or yolk. Duck eggs usually are around 120-135 g in the shell. I like using them for baking.
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Old 09-10-2019, 09:13 PM   #44
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sorry....ugh...omg.... messed up in responding....!
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Old 09-11-2019, 08:15 AM   #45
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Have anyone mixed yellow york in noodles? If not then try it, you will fall in love with this combo mixture.
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Old 09-11-2019, 09:47 AM   #46
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Have anyone mixed yellow york in noodles? If not then try it, you will fall in love with this combo mixture.
The pasta recipe I use calls for whole eggs.
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Old 09-11-2019, 11:02 AM   #47
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I also often crack an egg over a bowl of hot ramen. Egg drop ramen.
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Old 03-15-2020, 12:01 PM   #48
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I have to say I don't eat eggs very often, although I certainly like them, especially when it comes to omelettes.
But back to the heart of the discussion, I recently prepared a fried egg yolk that won me over. Of course the preparation is quite delicate, but with a little patience you get a really nice dish: slightly crunchy outside and runny inside.
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Old 03-15-2020, 12:45 PM   #49
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Can you describe how this is done? Sounds like something I'd enjoy. My husband probably wouldn't care for it because he likes his yolks cooked hard as a hockey puck. Nothin' runny for him.
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Old 03-15-2020, 01:56 PM   #50
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Thanks, but no big deal. If I cook my own, I don't get that, and if I order fried eggs, and ask for over-easy, I usually get my nice egg whites and still get the runny yolk.

If you don't flip the egg, it is hard to get the whites done without browning/burning the edges. :
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Fully cooked egg whites with runny yolk, two easy methods:

1.Fry eggs in hot bacon fat. sppon hot fat over the egg yolk until the skin pink. Do not flip the egg. Make sure to season properly when the egg is put into the hot pan.

If the egg is basted continuously with the hot fat, the whites will be completely cooked, and the yolk runny before the egg white edges become rubbery, or browned.

2. Place egg in hot pan with melted butter. Season. When the whites begin to harden, add two tbs. water and cover with a glass lid. Let he steam finish setting the egg white. Again, when the skin over the yolk turns pink, the whites are done just right, and the yolk is still runny.

Ok, now about eggs, I love the two above methods. I get the yummy, runny yolks, and well flavored egg whites.

The texture of the whites goes through different stages:
1. runny
2. set, white and tender
3. rubbery
4. browned and rubbery
5. translucent, crisp


Each of these can be achieved through basting, frying, boiling, poaching baking, and steaming. Each has their place in cooking. For instance, an American omelet is a dish that is designed to fill the belly with great omelet fillings, with the egg used to surround everything and hold the fillings together. Therefore, the egg is cooked to a slightly rubbery stage that will do just that, hold everything together.

The French Omelet, on the other had, is a celebration of the egg, with the fillings used to accent and compliment the egg flavor. The egg white and yolk are beaten together and lightly seasoned with salt, pepper, and maybe a little garlic and herbs of choice. This is then poured into a well buttered saute pan, with sloped sides The egg is swirled, and shaken to move uncooked egg from the top to the sides until the egg is almost fully set. i'ts still a litle runny on top when the scant cheese, and other accentuating ingredients are added. The omelet is then slid onto a plated, directly from the pan, and folded in half. The residual heat from the egg completes setting the omelet. It is tender, with the egg flavor playing the starring role. This is my favorite method for making omelets.

For poached eggs, I enjoy a tender, well seasoned egg white surrounding a soft yolk. I achieve this by heating water to a boil, adding 2 tsp. salt, turning down the heat until the water is no longer boiling, and then adding the eggs, one at a time. The water is hot enough to set the egg white, and heat the yolk, without the rapidly boiling water blowing them apart. I gently touch them with a spoon do determine when the whites are completely set. Wen done, I remove the eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon, and use them for whatever dish they accompany.

I likek to use poached eggs on top of corned beef hash, on top of buttered English Muffins, for Eggs Benedict, on top of a burge, or on hash-browns, or on buttered toast.
a poached egg is surprisingly good on steak tartar, or on a perfectly cooked Fillet Mingon.

I like to overcook my boiled eggs jsut a bit, so that the egg white is strong enough not to fall apart when making deviled eggs. For soft boiled eggs, the white must be cooked through, not runny whites, with an all soft yolk. At my altitude, with extra-large eggs, and on my stove setting, I place the eggs into the pot with enough cold water to cover, with an extra half inch of water above the egg. i turn on the heat. When the water just starts to boil, I set my timer for exactly 2 minutes, thirty-seven seconds. When the timer goes off, i put the eggs into a bowl of cold water, breaking the egg shells while transferring the eggs from the pan to the bowl. This makes them easy to peel as the whites, though fully set, are delicate, and will break easily, allowing the yolk to spill out and make a mess while I'm peeling the eggs. So I have to be gentle.

Here are a few pictures that I have taken, not retouched, but the actual picture of some of my egg adventures.

And as an answer to the original question for this thread, yes I love egg yolk, move when runny. But I have a good number of uses for a fully set yolk as well.

oh, and one of my most prized pots is an egg poacher pot, with four egg poaching cups. The pan is filled with about two inches of water, with a tray put on top.
The tray has four removable egg cups, with plastic handles. You smear a S&P.
Bring the water to a boil, and place the cups into the tray. Immediately put the eggs into the cups, and cover with the glass lid.

Let it steam until the whites are set and the yolk is still runny. Remove the cups, and gently pour the egg out of the little cup. These poached eggs are perfectly flavored by the butter, salt and pepper, with tender, but cooked whites, and a completely runny yolk. They have a beautiful shape and are great for straight up, for Eggs Benedict, or on top of buttered toast. If you cook the eggs until the yolk is solid, they make great deviled eggs.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-15-2020, 03:14 PM   #51
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The last couple of times we've had poached eggs, I did them with the sous vide. The first ones were a bit underdone. The next ones were nearly perfect. I hope the next time I can find where I put my notes on what to do. The yolks were nice and runny, and the whites were a little under done the first time, nearly perfect the next time. They came out of the shell perfectly.
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Old 03-17-2020, 10:29 AM   #52
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About fried egg yolk, that's what I've made recently...

I didn't have much hope of success at the beginning, but with a little patience and a lot of delicacy I succeeded. The waiting time for the yolks immersed in breadcrumbs to be ready, is about 3 hours, after which they recover because they fry in less than a minute.I did enjoy them a lot :-)

Serves 4, Preparation time 15-20 mins + about 3 hours refrigerate, Cooking time for each yolk – 1 minute
Egg, 8 (we estimated 2 yolks each guest)
Breadcrumbs, to taste
Peanuts oil for a deep-frying, 1lt
a pinch of salt
Fresh baby spinach, to taste
Method
In a bowl or in a plate, create a thick layer of breadcrumbs.
Separate delicately yolks from whites and set aside the latter.
Gently lay each yolk on the layer of breadcrumbs taking care not to stick them too much to each other.

Add more breadcrumbs until yolks are completely covered.

Cover with another plate and put to rest in the fridge for at least three hours.
Heat the oil in a pan.
Tip: to know if oil is hot enough, do the tootpick test by dipping it halfay down in the oil: if bubbles form around it, oil is ready.
Gently, release the yolks from the excess breadcrumbs by placing them on a skimmer and let the excess breadcrumbs falling down.

Place the skimmer with the breaded yolk in the pan and fry it for 40” max 1′ in the boiling oil. Frying two at a time and take off from the oil with the skimmer.

Tip: a longer frying time risks to cook the yolk completely whilst it has to remain runny inside. That’s the key of this recipe!

Fried yolks ready! Place them on the spinach so that each friend/guest can break their own yolk and eat it together with spinach.
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Old 03-17-2020, 11:16 AM   #53
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Quote:
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About fried egg yolk, that's what I've made recently...

...

Place the skimmer with the breaded yolk in the pan and fry it for 40” max 1′ in the boiling oil. Frying two at a time and take off from the oil with the skimmer.

Tip: a longer frying time risks to cook the yolk completely whilst it has to remain runny inside. That’s the key of this recipe!

Fried yolks ready! Place them on the spinach so that each friend/guest can break their own yolk and eat it together with spinach.
Does "fry it for 40” max 1′" mean to fry for 40 seconds to a maximum of 1 minute?
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