"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-03-2005, 06:16 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 40
Eggs without refridgeration

Okay, so I go to the supermarket, get a dozen eggs. And don't refridgerate it. How long are they good for?

cyberian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2005, 06:34 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
middie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cleveland,Ohio USA
Posts: 16,263
Send a message via Yahoo to middie
some people don't refridgerate there eggs at all but i wouldn't recommend it.
middie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2005, 09:58 PM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberian
Okay, so I go to the supermarket, get a dozen eggs. And don't refridgerate it. How long are they good for?
Check out this site:

http://www.aeb.org/
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 04:56 AM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 751
Until they float to the top of a glass full of water. Anything less than that is ok.

Its the only real way to know if eggs are still okay.
Haggis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 05:39 AM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Check out this site:

http://www.aeb.org/
Link doesn't work...

Quote:
Until they float to the top of a glass full of water. Anything less than that is ok.
Is there an estimate in days? There is no way I will submerse my eggs. I wish to know so I know how much I should get. I don't have a car, and the trip to the supermarket is not short. So if they last in a reason time for me, I wish to get more at once.
cyberian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 09:18 AM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,950
[QUOTE=cyberian]Link doesn't work...

Try it again later. It worked for me. It's the site for the American Egg Board.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 11:45 AM   #7
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
USDA CARTON STAMPING TELLS WHEN AND WHERE THE EGGS ARE PACKED

When the USDA grade shield is present on the carton, the carton must also be labeled with the date and location of where the eggs were packed. Consumers can also use this information to learn more about the eggs they are buying. This information is typically stamped onto one end of each carton of eggs. An example of a date and location code is shown in the picture below:

Cartons that have the USDA grade shield are marked to identify the company and location where the eggs were packed, and the date that the eggs were washed, graded, and placed into the cartons. In addition, most packers also provide consumers with a code date, which indicates the last date the eggs should be sold at retail, or used by the consumer.

1. CODE DATES:
Egg processors typically print dates commonly called "Code Dates" on cartons for purposes of rotating stock or controlling inventory. "EXP", "Sell By", "Best if Used Before" are examples of terminology used for code dating. Use of code dates on USDA graded eggs is optional, however, if they are used, certain rules must be followed.

If an expiration date is used, it must be printed in month/day format and preceded by the appropriate prefix. "EXP", "Sell By", "Not to be sold after the date at the end of the carton" are examples of expiration dates. Expiration dates can be no more than 30 days from the day the eggs were packed into the carton.

Another type of code dating used indicates the recommended maximum length of time that the consumer can expect eggs to maintain their quality when stored under ideal conditions. Terminology such as "Use by", Use before", "Best before" indicates a period that the eggs should be consumed before overall quality diminishes. Code dating using these terms may not exceed 45 days including the day the eggs were packed into the carton.

The expiration date in this example is "Aug 29".

2. PLANT NUMBER:
USDA assigns a plant number to each official plant where eggs are packed under USDA's grading service. This number is always preceded by the letter "P" and must be stamped or pre-printed on each carton. The plant number in this example is "P1380."

You can find out where the USDA graded eggs you buy are packed. Visit our List of Plants Operating Under USDA Poultry & Egg Grading Programs and follow directions to find out which plant packed your eggs.

3. PACK DATE:
The day of the year that the eggs are processed and placed into the carton must also be shown on each carton with the USDA grade shield. The number is a three-digit code that represents the consecutive day of the year. For example, January 1 is shown as "001" and December 31 as "365." Typically, eggs are packed within 1 to 7 days of being laid. The pack date in this example is "218", meaning that the eggs were packed on the 218th day of the year, or in this example, August 5. If your carton shows a USDA grade shield, you can determine the date that the eggs were packed from the carton date code.
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 03:56 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,557
Try one. If you get food poisoning then they're no good.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 04:08 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,557
^^^ Sorry. Left my browser open and my friend decided to post some "helpful" advice.

Seriously though, when it doubt, dump it. Getting food poisoning is not worth saving a few bucks.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2005, 07:41 AM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 751
You do not keep the eggs submersed, you simply test them as you use them.
Haggis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2005, 03:10 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Midwest
Posts: 874
Are your eggs stamped? You can use the code to find out date of production, etc. Probably each country has their own way of doing it, but in Germany the web site to find out is

http://www.ei-love-you.de/



You can try to find a similar site for your country.

Otherwise, you can also look at the egg in strong light and see if you can see air in the egg. As an egg gets older, you will see a bigger pocket of air in the shell.

I don't refrigerate my eggs because I buy them individually and use them individually and quickly. But I do check each one before using, just to be safe.
velochic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2005, 03:18 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggis
Until they float to the top of a glass full of water. Anything less than that is ok.
what if you only have a half of a glass of water??
will they still float if you're a pessimist????
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2005, 04:33 PM   #13
DC Grandma
 
Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 3,217
Buckytom...then eat only half of the egg............................................... ...
__________________
May I always be the person my dog thinks I am.

Walk towards the Sunshine and the Shadows will fall behind you!
Dove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2005, 10:14 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
ticoterry-EXPAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Costa Rica
Posts: 25
I have read somewhere that Eggs that are not refrigerated age at the rate of 1 day = 1 week refrigerated (for what it's worth).
Different degrees of freshness are good for different uses, i.e. really fresh eggs are needed for poaching, "aged" eggs are better to hard boil etc.
__________________
"Better to be safe than sorry, Always use a condiment when
cooking" .......
..tt-EXPAT
ticoterry-EXPAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2005, 10:25 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
cyberian - there are ways to keep eggs for an extended period of time without refrigeration. It's called "preserving". Here is the Google results for preserving eggs http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=preserving+eggs

You'll just have to do some reading ....
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.