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Old 06-04-2013, 08:43 AM   #21
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Not a Yogurt expert, but have dabbled in cultured products

Perhaps make sure you have whole milk and NOT the pasteurized stuff. I know that yogurt is a bit different than cheese, but I know this tip for when I make mozzarella.

Also, cleanliness. Also, maybe try a different recipe. Also, cleanliness + 1.
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Old 06-04-2013, 09:05 AM   #22
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Perhaps make sure you have whole milk and NOT the pasteurized stuff. I know that yogurt is a bit different than cheese, but I know this tip for when I make mozzarella.

Also, cleanliness. Also, maybe try a different recipe. Also, cleanliness + 1.

Why not pasteurized? As I mentioned above, my mom made yogurt weekly with off-the-shelf pasteurized, homogenized whole milk. She never had a problem.
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:49 AM   #23
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Thanks for the reminder of those nasty GMO products.

What is UHT?

I am a total clean freak in my kitchen so I know that wasn't/won't be a problem. I go through phases with yogurt and right now I'm not in the yogurt mood but when it becomes a craving I will be back in this thread for my experiment
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:00 PM   #24
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Why not pasteurized? As I mentioned above, my mom made yogurt weekly with off-the-shelf pasteurized, homogenized whole milk. She never had a problem.
Interesting... did a bit more looking. You are probably right on the pasteurization. In fact, it sounds like raw milk might actually be bad for yogurt since there may be competing bacteria with the starter. Things that make you go hmmmm.
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:50 PM   #25
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Perhaps make sure you have whole milk and NOT the pasteurized stuff.
Milk is either raw or pasteurized. Raw milk is the milk you get from the cow,goat, etc, without any type of processing (heating). It has to be quickly refrigerated, as otherwise it gets sour. Raw milk, as long as it comes from a healthy, clean animal is preferable as it contains all the good stuff. But, it is illegal in Canada. Raw milk is pasteurized in order to kill some bacteria and increase the shelf life. There are 3 big types of pasteurization: low temperature (60 degrees C), medium 75 C and UHT which is high temp, high pressure. UHT practically sterilize the milk. It also changes the form of its proteins.
That's why UHT milk is not good for making yogurt or cheese.
Simple sterilization does not destroy all the bacteria. The best type is low temp, but that's difficult to find.
Now, whole milk is all about its fat content. Whole milk should contain the same amount of fat as it is in the raw unprocessed milk. Other than whole milk (3.5-3.8%) there is 2% milk and 1% milk. Yogurt can be made with all these types of milk. The result won't be the same, though. The best is obviously, the whole milk, as the yogurt is more creamy. I've never used skimmed milk. But if you are on a diet, you might try the 2% milk. The result should be fine. 1% milk is too harsh for the pour yogurt to be good enough.
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:30 PM   #26
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I never said to use raw milk. I only said that pasteurized milk is not as good. I make yogurt quite often, and for a life of me I do not know why, but every other time it doesn't come out right. That is why I attribute the problem to pasteurized milk. I’ve never had problem with raw milk, unfortunately I can only get it once in a great while. In all the honesty I do not know what kind of process is used to pasteurize the milk I buy. I bet it is one of those with high temperature. So if you go with what Sabrina says you have to find out exactly which manufacturer uses what process.
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:39 PM   #27
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As far as fat content goes. If you go to a good farmer, especially in Europe you will find that fat content is much higher there than it is here in the States. It is not at all unusual for a cow to produce milk that is around 12-15% fat. American milk is actually reminds more of white water than milk, took me years to get used to it. Back in the Soviet years milk sold in the store was either 3 or 6% fat. Hal and half was way more.
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Old 06-09-2013, 01:56 PM   #28
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UHT which is high temp, high pressure. UHT practically sterilize the milk.
I made a mistake! UHT is all about ultra high temperature (135 Celsius)! That temperature kills all the bacteria, including spores. So, there is nothing about pressure...sorry. That does not make a difference for us, but I wanted to correct the mistake. I only realized that, when the edit button was gone...
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Old 06-09-2013, 02:27 PM   #29
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As far as fat content goes. If you go to a good farmer, especially in Europe you will find that fat content is much higher there than it is here in the States. It is not at all unusual for a cow to produce milk that is around 12-15% fat.
Charlie, about the fat content, cows have a maximum amount of fat around 5.5% (Jersey or Guernsey breeds of cows). Other types of milk (buffalo, sheep) contain more fat. Maybe you talk about a different type milk, not cows...
Milk is similar in Europe, and I am sure about that as I lived most of my life in Europe. There are quite the same breeds of cows...
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Old 06-10-2013, 10:17 AM   #30
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It is not as simple as breed of a cow. For example in Belgium the amount of milk taken from a cow averages half as much as it is here in the States. That affects the quality of the milk in many ways.
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:02 PM   #31
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Yes, milk quality could be quite different. The best one comes from grass fed animals. Of course I mean no hormones, antibiotics or other chemicals. There is a natural difference between summer and winter milk, as there is no fresh grass in winter. That is reflected in milk.
Unfortunately, we live in a super industrialized world, and we have little to no control to what we eat. This is true unless you are a farmer and produce your own food. Even so, the seeds, breeds are not what they were 100 years ago.
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Old 06-12-2013, 12:34 PM   #32
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Psst - you wanna know how to cheat?

I used to make yogurt with milk and culture, etc., with an electric warmer thingy. Then I discovered Easiyo. I expect it's available in the US as it's made in New Zealand.

You have a plastic insulated jar and an inner jar that you half fill with cold water, tip in the contents of the packet (dried cows' milk and culture), put lid on and shake vigorously and then top up with more cold water. Fill outer container with boiling water up to the mark and put inner jar inside. Screw on the top and leave for 8 hours or more. It makes a litre of yogurt (not good at maths but I think a litre is about 2 US pints or 4 cups). Takes only as long as it takes to boil the kettle.

The yoghourt is gorgeous. It is not as bland as the shop bought stuff. It comes in various "strengths" - greek, greek low fat, ordinary yogurt, "Slimmers" (which is virtually fat-free), and ordinary low fat.

I like the natural best but it also comes sweetened and in various flavours - toffee, vanilla, mango, lemon, strawberry, etc.,but I'm not keen as the texture is often a bit odd with the flavoured ones.

I don't usually use "kits" for making foods but I make an exception for this as I use gallons of yogurt.

(Shh! Don't tell anyone that I cheat - this is strictly between you and me)
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Old 06-12-2013, 01:08 PM   #33
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This is a very interesting thread. You kind folks are really giving me milk lessons.

I'm right next to Amish and the Mennonite culture so I do have access to raw, organic milk.

Once the urge hits me again I will go get some raw milk and use that instead.

I guess I'll make the plain and just add some fresh fruit to it as I eat it.
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Old 06-12-2013, 01:17 PM   #34
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I love raw milk. Unfortunately the sourse I get it from is not relaible and milk canno tbe drank raw. So I make stuff out of it mostly after bringing to a boling temps.
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Old 06-12-2013, 01:18 PM   #35
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... Even so, the seeds, breeds are not what they were 100 years ago.
This is so true. Sadly.
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Old 06-12-2013, 01:40 PM   #36
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I love raw milk. Unfortunately the sourse I get it from is not relaible and milk canno tbe drank raw. So I make stuff out of it mostly after bringing to a boling temps.
I didn't realize that you shouldn't drink it. Good to know because I was planning on it. Why shouldn't it be used just to drink?
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Old 06-12-2013, 01:59 PM   #37
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I didn't realize that you shouldn't drink it. Good to know because I was planning on it. Why shouldn't it be used just to drink?
If you want to drink raw milk it should come from a very clean, healthy animal + farm. Otherwise it can put you into trouble due to possible milk infestation (including TB) . Some bacteria could be quite bad. That's why milk is pasteurized in plants. If you buy raw milk, and the source is not fully reliable, I would boil that milk before drinking, even making yogurt. Yes, raw milk is full of vitamins, minerals, that are partly lost through pasteurization or boiling. But sometimes it is better to be safe than sorry.
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Old 06-12-2013, 05:48 PM   #38
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I didn't realize that you shouldn't drink it. Good to know because I was planning on it. Why shouldn't it be used just to drink?
Pasteurisation was originally introduced to kill the organisms which caused tuberculosis in humans. I don't know how things work in the US but in the UK, although vaccination of cattle to prevent TB is possible, it isn't allowed. There are very few producers and sellers of raw (ie unpasteurised) milk in Britain but it isn't forbidden in law. Raw milk is subjected to testing for TB organisms which is expensive and few producers want the fuss. I used it for many years until my milkman retired and then I couldn't find it locally so now I have to have the pasteurised sort.

Pasteurisation also kills brucellosis organisms which may be present in raw milk and can cause serious illness in humans..

Children, the sick and the elderly and anyone who is immune-suppressed either through illness or the use of medication certainly shouldn't use raw milk and the rest of us must decide on the risk for ourselves.
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Old 06-12-2013, 06:41 PM   #39
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I'll have to think about it. I did have TB when I was 3 so the way I understand it I should never get it back again because of the meds I had to take for 9 months.
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Old 06-12-2013, 07:07 PM   #40
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I didn't realize that you shouldn't drink it. Good to know because I was planning on it. Why shouldn't it be used just to drink?
What Sabrina said.

It's not that you should not drink it, but you have to make sure the source is reliable. I get from a huge farm, some 3000 cows, cannot be sure if they are all healthy.
When I get from a small goat farmer, he only has few goats I do not boil it. It's all safe and clean and yummy.
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