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Old 10-21-2016, 04:35 PM   #1
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Mozzarella di Buffalo

Today I bought, at Costco, some Mozzarella di Bufalo. It was more than a dollar cheaper than my normal grocer and larger. What I failed to do was check the expiry date. My bad...

I have found that the fresher it is the better the taste. Every day it ages it develops a bitter after taste.

So this one only had a week to go for "best before" (and yes, I fully understand that there are no laws governing the use of "best before" so don't even go there).

I have had others that have had up to two weeks of "best before" and just a slight after taste.

Does anyone have any experience with time frames in this incredible product?. This mozzarella, when fresh!, is the most delish stuff you can imagine. Boccaccini is tasteless as far as I'm concerned, even marinated in basalmic syrup but at least it doesn't have an 'after taste' that the buffalo seems to develop.

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Old 10-21-2016, 04:49 PM   #2
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I don't know for sure, but if the fresh mozz you've had before was made from cow's milk, and the Mozzarella di Bufalo was made from the traditional water buffalo milk, the latter might get a stronger flavor with age than you're used to. Here's some more info:

Cow vs Water Buffalo Mozzarella
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Old 10-21-2016, 05:55 PM   #3
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Thanks for the link GG, it was an interesting read.

But I'm not trying to compare Cow milk with Buffalo milk. I have obviously never had "FRESH" cow milk mozzarella if going by this persons' opinion. I do not find, nor have ever found, that it has ANY taste.

I could never understand everyone's fascination with the tomato, basil leaves, basalmic vinegar and fresh mozzarella recipe.

Whereas fresh Buffalo mozzarella does! Sweet, softer, spongier (that part of his comments I agree with) - melt on your tongue.

It is quite possible that age plays an important part in flavour. This was what I was asking about. If anyone here had any experience with it.

Shortly after I 'discovered' Mozzarella di Buffalo for myself, I saw a Lynn Crawford episode of Pitching In from a Buffalo farm in Ontario. I may try to find them.
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Old 10-21-2016, 11:29 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
I could never understand everyone's fascination with the tomato, basil leaves, basalmic vinegar and fresh mozzarella recipe.

Whereas fresh Buffalo mozzarella does! Sweet, softer, spongier (that part of his comments I agree with) - melt on your tongue.

It is quite possible that age plays an important part in flavour. This was what I was asking about. If anyone here had any experience with it.
Lots of experience here. The first time I had mozzarella di bufala was in Naples back in the early 90s, when a buddy and I spent four months there on a USO tour. I fell in love with it, and couldn't get enough. The real deal is light and almost airy. I like it just plain with a pinch of salt and cracked pepper sprinkled over the top

The salad you speak of is called insalata caprese in Italy, and it's a summer staple along the Amalfi coast. A real Italian wouldn't dream of putting balsamic on it. It's nothing more than tomatoes, mozzarella, fresh basil, olive oil and a sprinkling of salt. That's it. BUT it has to be absolutely fresh, and that's the difference I've found between the ones I enjoyed in Italy and the bland restaurant versions you find here.

Oh... and if you're ever able to enjoy it at a beach front cafe overlooking the Mediterranean, I think you'll change your tune and agree it's just about the best tasting thing in the world!
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Old 10-22-2016, 08:13 AM   #5
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Lots of experience here.The real deal is light and almost airy.***

The salad you speak of is called insalata caprese in Italy, ***

*** I think you'll change your tune and agree it's just about the best tasting thing in the world!
I've made insalata caprese multiple times. I try to get the freshest possible in cow's milk variety. My guests are always delighted. Me, not so much as I know what the di Buffalo tastes like and would much prefer that.

So I've never served it using di Buffalo - mainly because if it is really fresh, I gobble it all up for myself.. But also it is not common in our grocery stores. It is a hit or miss situation. You just never know when it will be on the shelf.

But Steve you don't say if you've ever noticed a difference in age on the mozzarella's - of course fresh is always better, but how old is old and when does it start to change!

No matter what the package says - they are all labeled fresh.

I don't need to change my mind! I already love it!! when I can get it fresh...
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:48 AM   #6
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But Steve you don't say if you've ever noticed a difference in age on the mozzarella's - of course fresh is always better, but how old is old and when does it start to change!
Fresh cheeses start to age as soon as they're made. They can keep between one and two weeks and after that, it starts to get risky to eat them. The bitterness you're tasting is the byproduct of mold development (you can't see the initial growth of mold without a microscope; learned that in master gardener class when we were studying plant diseases).

From http://www.eatbydate.com/dairy/chees...piration-date/
Quote:
How long does soft or semi-soft cheese last? Soft cheeses will last about 1-2 weeks beyond their printed dates, specific cheeses are outlined in the following table. Cheese consists of the proteins and fat from milk and is produced throughout the world in hundreds of flavors, textures, and forms. Some common soft cheeses include Mozzarella, Havarti and Monterey Jack and semi-soft cheeses include Brie cheese, Feta cheese, Ricotta cheese and Cream cheese. In addition to its great taste and creamy texture, soft cheese is valued for its high content of protein and calcium."
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:58 AM   #7
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It is quite possible that age plays an important part in flavour. This was what I was asking about. If anyone here had any experience with it.
I missed this part of your earlier post. Age is definitely a factor when it comes to the flavors of cheese. I attended a cheese-making class last spring and the instructor gave us samples of cheeses she had aged for different amounts of time - three weeks, two months, six months. They all had different flavors and textures.

The thing is that fresh cheeses go bad as they age beyond a couple of weeks because they're not treated with something to prevent the growth of pathogens, especially molds (you can't see initial mold growth without a microscope; learned that in master gardener class when we were studying plant diseases). That's why they need to be eaten within a couple weeks.

Cheeses intended to be aged are treated with salt and/or acid to kill the pathogens and then refrigerated at specific temperatures. As they age, new flavor compounds develop. That's why three-year-old Parmigiano Reggiano has much more flavor than six-month-old Parmesan.

So the sugar and acid in the balsamic syrup-marinated bocconcini you mentioned would preserve that specific product a little longer.
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Old 10-22-2016, 12:51 PM   #8
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So the sugar and acid in the balsamic syrup-marinated bocconcini you mentioned would preserve that specific product a little longer.
ahh well, between the devil and the deep blue sea.... very important to preserve that specific product that has no taste !!
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Old 10-22-2016, 12:53 PM   #9
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So GG - I guess you've answered my question.

I will never know how "fresh" any mozzarella is as they never put on a manufacturing date for us. Only a best before. too bad, so sad - it means it will always be a turkey shoot as to whether it is fresh or not.

I will have to search out the buffalo farm in Ontario and go visit them I guess.
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Old 10-22-2016, 01:03 PM   #10
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ahh well, between the devil and the deep blue sea.... very important to preserve that specific product that has no taste !!
They marinate it to add flavor. Making it keep longer is a side effect.
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Old 10-22-2016, 01:03 PM   #11
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So GG - I guess you've answered my question.

I will never know how "fresh" any mozzarella is as they never put on a manufacturing date for us. Only a best before. too bad, so sad - it means it will always be a turkey shoot as to whether it is fresh or not.

I will have to search out the buffalo farm in Ontario and go visit them I guess.
It's fairly easy to make it at home. Takes about half an hour. Also, there's an Italian restaurant near us that makes their own and they sell it at the two farmers markets in my town. You might be able to buy it directly from a restaurant, like people do pizza dough.

https://youtu.be/6r7p25YJQk0
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Old 10-22-2016, 01:11 PM   #12
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It's not just the cheese that makes the caprese salad, it's the tomatoes too. We all know the difference between a tomato picked ripe or almost ripe and the ones we buy in the store.

You can also substitute roasted red bell pepper for the tomato slices. Different but equally good (better if you can't get great tomatoes) and a change of pace.

And, yes, I've noticed a change in taste. I've never had freshly made buffalo moz here in the States, but I have had freshly made cow's milk moz from the local Italian delis that make it fresh every day. It does start to develop an off taste after a few days in the fridge.
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Old 10-23-2016, 01:00 AM   #13
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I used Galbani mozz cheese on our pizzas last night. The package said it was made in Buffalo, New York. Would that qualify it as Buffalo Mozzarella?
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Old 10-23-2016, 03:16 AM   #14
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But Steve you don't say if you've ever noticed a difference in age on the mozzarella's - of course fresh is always better, but how old is old and when does it start to change?
Fresh buffalo mozzarella in Italy is made from raw, unpasteurized milk. It only has a shelf life of a few days before it turns sour and the texture becomes "gloopy." It's not meant to age. People there tend to use it the same day it's made.

Over here, who knows? Most cheese, at least in the US, is made from pasteurized milk, which will extend the shelf life. I still think I'd use it up as quickly as possible. Certainly within a couple of weeks.
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Old 10-23-2016, 06:04 AM   #15
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Whopeee! Googled and found! Don't know why they didn't come up before but there you go... mysteries of the universe.

There are quite a few Water Buffalo farms in Canada, I was a bit surprised. I didn't googled the States but it seems quite a few were imported here from Vermont, with one importing close to 300 to start their farm.

And here is the info I was looking for...

"Mozzarella di bufala is at its best within two or three days of production. It’s soft and elastic and delicious from Day One but seems to gain buttery flavour by the second or third day."

above taken froom this 2014 article

Unfortunately so far as I can find out - manufacturers do not put date of production on.
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Old 10-23-2016, 06:06 AM   #16
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Whopeee! Googled and found! Don't know why they didn't come up before but there you go... mysteries of the universe.

There are quite a few Water Buffalo farms in Canada, I was a bit surprised. I didn't googled the States but it seems quite a few were imported here from Vermont, with one importing close to 300 to start their farm.

And here is the info I was looking for...

"Mozzarella di bufala is at its best within two or three days of production. It’s soft and elastic and delicious from Day One but seems to gain buttery flavour by the second or third day."

above taken froom this 2014 article

Unfortunately so far as I can find out - manufacturers do not put date of production on.
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Old 10-23-2016, 10:53 AM   #17
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We only ever have Mozzarella in the summer months, when the Mozzarella di Bufala is at its best and particulary in the tomato season, when the fresh basil (Ligurian basil is the most fragrant) is in season as well. That's the time when an Insalata Caprese is magic. I just put top quality EVOO, salt and pepper on.
There's nothing like it! Mozzarella di Bufala is also wonderful on pizza Napoletana, and I make an antipasto snack:ciabatta bruschetta with summer tomatoes, Mozzarella, and fresh made Pesto Genovese. You should try it. Washed down with a light dry withe wine. It's heaven.


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