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Old 12-14-2006, 11:02 AM   #21
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I knew it, I knew we'll finally find a coming ground, Breezy, and finaly here it is I completely agree with you on this one, yeah!
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Old 12-14-2006, 11:20 AM   #22
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Cast iron benefits especially from having greasy things cooked in it--fried chicken, bacon, etc. It adds to the seasoning. If you have a pan "dedicated" to cooking eggs, a non-stick would be the top candidate--and it still benefits from a skosh of oil/grease.
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Old 12-14-2006, 11:25 AM   #23
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LOL!!!! You're too funny CharlieD. It must be the spirit of the season that's brought our minds together - LOL!!!!!
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Old 12-14-2006, 11:28 AM   #24
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But getting back to eggs & cast iron - it just occurred to me that the only time I've ever used my cast-iron pan to cook eggs was for making "Dumplings & Eggs", using leftover Czech bread dumplings from another meal. The cast iron definitely gives the dumpling chunks a crispy exterior that really can't be accomplished in anything else.
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Old 12-14-2006, 02:02 PM   #25
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I crack them in a bowl and add a little milk and water. I then scramble them in the bowl with a fork and put them on the pan right away, and I scramble them again when the eggs get a little warmer on the pan
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Old 12-14-2006, 03:23 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboenomo
... and add a little milk and water ...
That is counter productive one cansels the other. There was a whole thread on milk and water here, look it up.
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Old 12-15-2006, 01:21 AM   #27
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You could have a profitable restaurant serving only scramble eggs: easy scramble, hard scramble, scrabble scramble, scrappie scramble, kiss n' scramble. The possibilities are endless. (porker pot scramble, vegably delicious).
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Old 12-15-2006, 05:55 AM   #28
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Adding just a little water helps the eggs get smooth--all the white incorporated. But adding milk makes a watery scramble. My parents did that--and I, of course, thought that was what it should be.
The water is (for my experience) is how a good omelette is attained so it should be good for the scramble also!!
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Old 12-15-2006, 09:13 AM   #29
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You can use either milk or water and not have watery eggs. Watery scrambled eggs usually are the result of over cooking. The heat causes the proteins to shrink, squeezing out the water trapped within.
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Old 12-15-2006, 09:55 AM   #30
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I also have a cast iron skillet and love it (though I have never thought of using it to make eggs). It is especially great for fried chicken and for making corn bread. This skillet came from my grandmother to my mother and now to me. I plan to pass it to one of my kids eventually.
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Old 12-15-2006, 05:53 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomW
I had an old wife tell me I should have a cast iron pan dedicated only to cooking eggs.

Has anyone else heard such a thing?

Tom
yes, I have heard this before. But it was about making omelettes. And the pan was meant to be cleaned only by using a piece of bread and some salt.
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Old 12-17-2006, 04:33 PM   #32
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both is what I do...
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Old 12-17-2006, 06:50 PM   #33
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Beat in a bowl after adding everything. :) I learned how to make scrambled eggs that way and have been doing it ever since.
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Old 12-17-2006, 10:51 PM   #34
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I used to bother beating them in a mixing bowl first but then I realized I was still scrambling them with a fork once they hit the hot butter in the pan so why bother? They turn out just as well and there's one less thing to wash up. I add a dash of milk to mine and salt & pepper. Sometimes I toss in some grated cheese but most often not. Penzey's - PENZEYS Spices Home Page - makes a wonderful herb blend, Parisien Bonnes Herbs, which is a most excellent addition to scrambled eggs! In fact I use this salt-free blend in a lot of things. Hey, folks near Memphis, there's a Penzey's at the corner of Poplar & Kirby Parkway.

I also must have my scrambled eggs very moist and fluffy, not "hard cooked". Keep in mind eggs continue to cook well after you've removed them from the heat.

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