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Old 07-30-2012, 09:11 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by chopper View Post
I layered cheese ravioli with sauce, moz.cheese and Parm cheese and baked it in the oven. You were all making me hungry for lasagna and I didn't have ricotta or cottage cheese. I was pleased with the result!
We do that at a few of our units, basically by popular demand. People LOVE Ravioli Pie, it's all the goodness of lasagna, in a different presentation. Same can be done with tortilini, and a hearty ragout, or meat sauce.
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Old 07-30-2012, 09:18 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by TATTRAT

We do that at a few of our units, basically by popular demand. People LOVE Ravioli Pie, it's all the goodness of lasagna, in a different presentation. Same can be done with tortilini, and a hearty ragout, or meat sauce.
Yes! I do it with tortolini quite often.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:14 PM   #43
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i've only used ricotta, but after so many people here have said that cottage cheese works - with a bit of work - i'll try something new.

i've made dozens of big (full, deep, steam table/aluminum serving pan size ) lasagnas over the years for company holiday parties, and the ricotta was always one of the big differences year to year, i've thought. from sheer factor in the layers (like an avalanche), to flavour, the ricotta was a major factor to what worked or didn't.

i will report results when it comes to pass.
I use my wooden mallet thingy that came with my chinoise (sp) (china cap) for mashing the cottage cheese through the sieve. I have to say, I much prefer the cottage cheese I get in the States--the Cdn cottage cheese is not the same. I don't like it--I rarely buy it. The curds are too big, it is too watery. It doesn't taste the same--but neither does Cdn milk. There are some things that just don't work when you move to another country--for me, cottage cheese is one of those things, milk in plastic bags is the other. But poutine, well, that definitely works for me.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:19 PM   #44
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For those that want to give it a go at home, who can't find ricotta, it is one of the EASIEST cheese to make at home. All it takes is some whole milk, some acid(either vinegar, lemon, or traditionally an artichoke) start the milk cold with the acidic agent, and bring up to 165 degrees. The Curds(milk fat) will come to the top, and the whey will go to the bottom. Strain through cheese cloth, and allow to "dry" a bit. You can either salt the milk, or salt the finished cheese.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:22 PM   #45
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For those that want to give it a go at home, who can't find ricotta, it is one of the EASIEST cheese to make at home. All it takes is some whole milk, some acid(either vinegar, lemon, or traditionally an artichoke) start the milk cold with the acidic agent, and bring up to 165 degrees. The Curds(milk fat) will come to the top, and the whey will go to the bottom. Strain through cheese cloth, and allow to "dry" a bit. You can either salt the milk, or salt the finished cheese.
I've tried it a couple of times with the milk we can get here--it didn't work--once with vinegar, the other time with lemon juice (fresh). I've been meaning to try it again with organic milk from NY. Since I'm going down this weekend, maybe I'll push my milk allowance ($20) at the border and bring an extra gallon back to try that...4 l of milk here is around $6...so experimenting with cheese-making techniques can get a bit expensive. Especially if it doesn't work.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:30 PM   #46
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I am sure that you have some local farmers markets, those cows tend to get a little more hearty/better of a diet, meaning better milk(in theory). Could give' em a shot?
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:38 PM   #47
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I am sure that you have some local farmers markets, those cows tend to get a little more hearty/better of a diet, meaning better milk(in theory). Could give' em a shot?
In Ontario, there is a milk quota. Farmers can't sell raw milk. You have to buy a share--shares go for $250 for 6 years, and you still pay $7-8/liter. Failed cheese making attempts could be very expensive play sessions in the kitchen.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:50 PM   #48
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WOW, That is nuts!! I honestly had no idea of the quotas involved. I see where you are coming from.

In the States, it is hard to find raw milk anywhere. . . period. While I understand the desire for pasteurization, folks freak out with raw milk/cheese, forgetting that the process wasn't "invented" until 1862, but dates back to 1117(in china), and forgetting that humans have seemed to make it just fine for all the years making it up to then without pasteurizing.

Also, the price per LITER, OUCH, man. .. people gripe at 5/6 a gallon here, I would love to see them pay 28 for a gallon! These are the same folks that pay $3 for a bottle of water though, lol.
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:23 PM   #49
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WOW, That is nuts!! I honestly had no idea of the quotas involved. I see where you are coming from.

In the States, it is hard to find raw milk anywhere. . . period. While I understand the desire for pasteurization, folks freak out with raw milk/cheese, forgetting that the process wasn't "invented" until 1862, but dates back to 1117(in china), and forgetting that humans have seemed to make it just fine for all the years making it up to then without pasteurizing.

Also, the price per LITER, OUCH, man. .. people gripe at 5/6 a gallon here, I would love to see them pay 28 for a gallon! These are the same folks that pay $3 for a bottle of water though, lol.
Hence, why making any kind of cheese--soft or hard--is a very expensive hobby here. And then when that bagged milk doesn't work, it is really frustrating. I'm working on getting raw milk from my former landlord (30 years ago). I was able to get raw milk for one of my dogs with a heart condition through a friend of mine 5-6 years ago...she's my other source. I refuse to buy a share for $250 for 6 years and still pay $7-8 / liter (price depends on if you want the cream or not).
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Old 07-31-2012, 05:52 AM   #50
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In the States, it is hard to find raw milk anywhere. . . period. While I understand the desire for pasteurization, folks freak out with raw milk/cheese, forgetting that the process wasn't "invented" until 1862, but dates back to 1117(in china), and forgetting that humans have seemed to make it just fine for all the years making it up to then without pasteurizing.
Actually, until about 100 years ago, people's life expectancy was in the 40s, due primarily to infectious disease (including food poisoning) and death during childbirth. That's why pasteurization, canning, antiseptics and antibiotics were invented.

I usually use ricotta because I like its flavor and texture better, but I've used cottage cheese before. It's okay
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:32 AM   #51
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When I use cottage cheese for lasagna I simply mix it with the other ingredient, i.e. bell peppers, mushrooms, etc., per my recipe, in food processor, works like a charm.
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Old 07-31-2012, 12:21 PM   #52
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Tatt: Margaux┤s Lasagne al Forno di Emilia Romagna

This is our shellfish and seafood lasagne ...

Thanks for your ricotta recipe too ... I make mine all the time; it is in the Cheese D.C. section since January.

Buonasera, Ciao.
Margaux Cintrano
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Old 07-31-2012, 12:24 PM   #53
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Tatt: Margaux┤s Lasagne al forno di Bolognese

This is my classic Bolognese lasagne from my Grandmom Margherite who was born and raised in Milano, Lombardia.

Kind regards,
Margi.
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Old 07-31-2012, 12:25 PM   #54
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Thanks for the very interesting post and feedback. Lots of food for thought.



Ciao,
Margaux Cintrano.
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Old 07-31-2012, 12:49 PM   #55
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I haven't tried ricotta in years, but I always thought it had sort of a bland, grainy texture. I use small curd cottage cheese in place of it. I feel like it has more of a tangy flavor. I'll have to try draining the curds, and I'll also have to give ricotta another chance now that's it's been a few years. Can you make ricotta with pasteurized milk? Just curious with all this talk about raw milk.
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Old 07-31-2012, 01:16 PM   #56
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I haven't tried ricotta in years, but I always thought it had sort of a bland, grainy texture. I use small curd cottage cheese in place of it. I feel like it has more of a tangy flavor. I'll have to try draining the curds, and I'll also have to give ricotta another chance now that's it's been a few years. Can you make ricotta with pasteurized milk? Just curious with all this talk about raw milk.
I have not tried to make ricotta. I've read about it lately.
The resources I read (wish I could find them for you) said pasteurized was okay, but, not ultra-pasteurized. Past your eyes.
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Old 07-31-2012, 09:30 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
I haven't tried ricotta in years, but I always thought it had sort of a bland, grainy texture. I use small curd cottage cheese in place of it. I feel like it has more of a tangy flavor. I'll have to try draining the curds, and I'll also have to give ricotta another chance now that's it's been a few years. Can you make ricotta with pasteurized milk? Just curious with all this talk about raw milk.
Actually, ricotta is made from the whey leftover when making mozzarella.
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Old 07-31-2012, 09:30 PM   #58
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I usually use cottage or farmer's cheese because ricotta is so expensive by comparison.
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:54 PM   #59
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Actually, ricotta is made from the whey leftover when making mozzarella.
Really? The recipes I see just call for boiled milk and salt, add vinegar, pour over cheese cloth and discard whey...
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:06 AM   #60
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Really? The recipes I see just call for boiled milk and salt, add vinegar, pour over cheese cloth and discard whey...
Those recipes make a decent substitute for ricotta. I just checked - ricotta can be made from the whey of other cheeses too.

Ricotta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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