"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Click Here to Login
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-22-2006, 03:20 PM   #21
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,803
As an addendum - it's wonderful that you have the time to make all your own ketchup, mustard, mayo, salad dressings, etc., etc., etc. - but do keep in mind that not everyone has that kind of time or inclination. Most of us are also not privileged to personally know the chickens & cattle our food comes from. I don't think that necessarily makes you better fed or better informed than anyone here.

I also don't think that reduces anyone's "level of competence" here, nor does it mean any of us are "struggling to put a meal on the table". I don't think one has anything to do with the other.

Perhaps I'm confused as to what you were trying to accomplish here?
BreezyCooking is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 04:22 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
"Somewhere is my memory bank, I recall? government cheese, perhaps in my grandma's day. If I remember, it was real cheese that came in wooden boxes."
I must be from a time warp. I'm only 33, and I remember vividly my grandmother using gov't cheese and gov't butter (often rancid). I even remember about 10 years later hearing the phrase "gov't sponge bolonga" used at BBQ's (real BBQ, smoked meats).

Every now and then, PeppA will somehow manage to secure some USDA issue canned chicken, canned pork, canned salmon, "farina" (think Cream of Wheat), and dehydrated milk. This stuff all comes in a black and white label, with the phrase "Not for resale. Only to be used for Native American and Non-Profit Food distribution." I can tell you from experience that the salmon isn't worth the can. The chicken and pork isn't that bad, but it does need jazzing up. I've sucessfully used the chicken for the Chicken Helper Cheesey Mexican boxed meal. The pork I've used for Pork Posole. I haven't used the Farina yet, but I happen to like Cream of Wheat, and I always doctor the stuff up, so I may start using it. The dry milk powder I have used, and while it produces milk that has little lumps of unincorporated mix in it, it is perfectly usable.

I personally don't care for Velveeta. I don't like the taste. I can understand the desire to use something that melts great, and the fact that you don't have to refrigerate it until it's opened.

I also don't use that many commercially-prepared products. Granted, yes, I do use commercial condiments, and my pantry does have a lot of conveince foods in it, but I personally don't normally use them.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 04:49 PM   #23
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,565
I basolutely adore a great Havarti, or Fontina, or Cheddar. But they have their own place in my cullinary world, as does Velveeta. Velveeta is made from real cheese. It is in fact, a combination of cheeses melted, and blended with milk. It's a bit saltier than is unprocessed cheese, and has some preservatives added to help plolong its freshness. It is also wrapped airtight and does require refridgeration one opened. I love great cheese, but that doesn't mean I shy away from a great cheese product, which I think Velveeta is. I like its flavor, and melting qualities, but only for some things. I like other cheeses for other things. In fact, in one particular instance, when I didn't have any, I made my own version with the cheeses I had on hand (cheddar, swiss, and jack I believe, with a bit of added salt and milk). It was just what I needed for what I was making.

I wouldn't think of topping apple pie with anything other than a good cheddar. But I certainly wouldn't top it with a good bleau cheese. The flavors aren't complimentary.

Like most of us here, I won't bash someone else's idea of what's good. I love liverwurst, and also potted meat sandwiches.. My wife hates them. Does that make me right and her wrong? No it doesn't. Some of the foods she loves are barely edible to me, such as mint. If the mint is strong enough, it can make me physically ill. So, I'm not going to eat a Peppermint Pattie anytime soon. But she can enjoy them all day long if she wants to (no kissing afterwords though). Again, neither of us is wrong, simply different.

So, my advise is to open your mind to the fact that we are all different, and as is often said, one man's trash is another man's treasure.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now  
Old 05-22-2006, 05:10 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Yikes, beth, you have opened up a can o' worms with your original post.

I am happy for you that you have the leisure, knowledge, and means to prepare or purchase organic foods to your liking, but you must realize that not everyone is in the same circumstances - or even wants to be there.

Doesn't make you right or them wrong, or vice versa. But I detect a whiff of condescension in your views that I do not agree with.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 05:15 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,803
Thank you Mudbug - very well said.
BreezyCooking is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 06:21 PM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
well I love this thread so thanks for opening it and for all the responses!
Yes I do think "America" eats poorly. More fresh and more variety would help us all. I also think way too many of us eat at fast food and "family" (food service) restaurants. I hear the "cost factor" but for the cost of a supersize fast food meal for one, I can feed a group of four hungry teenagers, with fresh or dried ingredients...pasta, beans, rice, collards or kale, tomatos, simple dried herbs; etc, and when the kids have a hand in making it, they eat it!
If I could spend all day in the home kitchen I would...I love it. But, I owe I owe, so it's off to work I go. Gotta pay for all those copper pots and pans I have. So, nough said by me right now...carry on!
Robo410 is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 06:39 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
... Peppermint Pattie ... But she can enjoy them all day long if she wants to (no kissing afterwords though).
Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Wow. You're a tough cookie, GW.

mish is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 06:41 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Beth, there are a lot of intelligent, educated people here who really do know food...even those few of us who like Velveeta.

But consider this.

I was exposed to fine foods at an early age. My grandfather was quite a connaisseur of food and life in general, and grandma was an excellent cook and a great hostess. I grew up being used to the good china and crystal, and knowing which fork to use first. She and my mother always prepared "balanced meals".
I've also been to many fine restaurants all over the USA.

But some of the best meals I've ever eaten came from people with little or no education. Most of them have never been anyplace "away".
Few of them have ever used a cookbook or a recipe, unless it's a "rule" for cake or cookies. Some couldn't even read past 5th grade level. They learned to cook the way their mothers and grandmothers did.
They cook from experience and with the heart, using what they have on hand.
I learned a lot from my grandma, but I have learned a lot from them, too.

I guess the moral of my story is...don't look down your nose at anyone. You never know what you might learn.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 06:50 PM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
I must be from a time warp. I'm only 33, and I remember vividly my grandmother using gov't cheese and gov't butter (often rancid). I even remember about 10 years later hearing the phrase "gov't sponge bolonga" used at BBQ's (real BBQ, smoked meats).
Allen, that was me, 'bout the memory of goverment cheese...no problem though. We didn't have a lot of money growing up, so I'm thankful I'm able to buy some of the things I enjoy when I can. For me, it's a matter of taste... so I wouldn't advocate boycotting a particular food, simply because it was not 'my cup of tea.' That's my story, and I'm sticking to it
mish is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 07:01 PM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Raton,NM, USA
Posts: 4,572
I love all the good cheeses but I also like Velveeta in some things it does make a good regular mac & cheese or grilled cheese.As I said before if I was on a deserted island and all there was for cheese was Velveeta I would be very to have it. And kids love it.
jpmcgrew is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 07:50 PM   #31
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
I very much appreciate this site.

Because people are so kind and helpful.

If someone wants to start a thread about, OK, let us say Velveeta recipes, great to me.

I can, or not as I choose, read it.

But let those who, and I may well be among them, choose to participate do so.

And for those who wish to start a thread about, oh, Gjetost cheese, well go ahead. I will post, but will probably be one of the few who will (love the stuff, but it is an acquired taste, to say the least).

Have learned many things on this site from the great posters, at times even when I was not particularly intrigued by the topic.

We try to keep an open mind.

And thanks to all the folks who have taught me so much.

Hope this site continues in that manner.

Take care and God bless.
auntdot is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 08:06 PM   #32
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
I liked velveta when I was a kid, but my tastes have changed and I think velveta is way to salty for me. I prefer a good sharp cheddar like cracker barrel brand. Velveta is definately economical, I guess it's healthy according to what people on here have said. I think the biggest expense for me at the grocery store is in the produce section. Here in Maine, produce can be so expensive since we have a short growing season and much of our produce is imported during the off season. Obviously it's less expensive to buy produce that is in season, but boy I love tomatoes year round, so they are really expensive when imported.

As far as buying "processed" foods, just check the labels. If you dont like what it contains, dont buy it. Bottom line is, what we spend on food depends on our finances, and how many people we have to feed. Obviously everyone would like to eat healthy, but eating healthy is very expensive for most.
amber is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 08:07 PM   #33
Head Chef
 
JMediger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
...I expect a certain level of competence from people contributing to some threads in these forums. If you have a computer and time to read this forum, you probably are not struggeling to put a meal on the family table. I have a great deal of respect for the people who post here and like to challenge their thinking. I just found it very incongruous to be talking of high quality ingredients and velvetta in the same sentence ... judging by what is sold in grocery stores, most Americans make poor food choices. We can make a difference in our purchasing power if we choose unadulterated, wholesome foods with our food dollar votes. I am all about education, reading, thinking, questioning.
Well, Beth, I congratulate you for finding a way to do what you do. As a full time teacher, there is no way I could ever hope to make all that I think my family should have. My little garden does great by me ...

In response, no, we're not struggling to put food on the table now but there was a time when we were - that was my point. Growing up in the grocery business, I know what people buy and I know what people can afford.

Finally, while I have not always agreed, I respect every person I have ever met on this site - I think every thought and idea each of us brings to the "table" is valid and has the right to be heard openly. I truly do not appreciate the condesending tone to which you have responded to so many of us who have responded to your thread. If you did not what a discussion, why start it? And no, fresh eggs do not need to be refrigerated.
JMediger is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 08:37 PM   #34
Sous Chef
 
Corinne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mystic, CT - transplanted from Lancaster, PA
Posts: 596
Send a message via AIM to Corinne
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Doesn't make you right or them wrong, or vice versa. But I detect a whiff of condescension in your views that I do not agree with.
Amen, Amen, Amen!!! One of my all time favorite things is a Broccoli Casserole made with (you guessed it) Velveeta.

And yes, I only wish I had the time to make all my stuff from scratch - but if I knew the chickens & cows, I could never eat them, so it's just as well that they remain anonymous to me.

Unfortunately, I have to work outside the home for a couple reasons so I do the very best I can. I'm not ashamed of the processed foods I use if the end result tastes good - that's all I'm after! Tastes great & I'm happy! Besides - I don't think I could make mayo as good as Hellman's does!

Corinne
__________________
I'm all about the food!
Corinne is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 08:51 PM   #35
DC Grandma
 
Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 3,217
I haven't had Velveta in a very long time but I do remember it was salty...and to add to all this

I like Spam......LOL but thats another can of worms to open.
Dove
__________________
May I always be the person my dog thinks I am.

Walk towards the Sunshine and the Shadows will fall behind you!
Dove is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 08:54 PM   #36
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
Shhh, dont tell anyone Dove, but I like spam too lol, fried spam with eggs is great....mums the word. :)
amber is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 09:22 PM   #37
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,230
Just as a note to you all posting in this thread may I congratulate you for remaining appropriate and not descending to personal attacks about various preferences. Thank you from the Helpers and Admins, we appreciate it when a semi controversial thread can remain open to all posters.

Oh, and while I am certainly not in the upper echelon of gourmet chefs on this site, I do know my way around the kitchen and feel I have a lot to offer in terms of advice, and on the flip side, lots to learn from all of you. And I too, like Velveeta.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline  
Old 05-22-2006, 09:22 PM   #38
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,565
The main reason I don't purchase really high quality foods is that they simply aren't available in the grocery stores available where I live. Up here in small town USA, on the Canada border, our growing season is very short and fresh produce is hard to come by, limited in variety, and expensive, often costing as much as meat. And good cheese is also very expensive, say 8$ per pound. And to get the good stuff, I have to travel to Ontario from Michigan. And due to environmental concerns, the greater variety available on the Canadian side of the border can not be taken accross the border. So I do the best I can with the ingredients available to me.

Yes, I do love good food and quality ingredients, but am not willing to give up the majesty of Lake Superior or our incredibly beautiful Northern forests, mosquitoes, snow, and all of the inconveniences of our Northern winters to get the abundance of foods, or fine restaurants available, say, in Detroit.

Besides, how much better can it get than freshly caught brookies or wild blueberries (now that's some quality food!).

I can't even get San Marsano tomatoes in our markets. So, am I living a deprived life? If you could have watched my children sledding in the winter snows, or swimming in pristine waters, or fishing, or canoing, and all of the things I did with them as they were growing, well that was far more important than having the perfect food available to me.

Would I love to have better foods available, I believe anyone who knows me on this site could answer that question without hesitation. But it's just not possible, so I make the best of it with what is available. I truly believe that if one is to be happy, one must enjoy the bounty that is provided, in whatever form it takes, wherever we are.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is online now  
Old 05-22-2006, 10:41 PM   #39
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
IMHO - I don't think that the demonization of Velveeta is representative of if someone is feeding their family a generally healthy diet or not ... unless it consists entirely of Velveeta cheese. I ate it frequently when I was a child ... my children ate it on occasions ... none of us have Velveeta induced health issues. Yep, we also ate SPAM, fried bologna ... fried SPAM with Velveeta, fried bologna with Velveeta ... sometimes with BBQ sauce.

Velveeta has it's place ... as all cheeses, or cheese products, do. I don't know of any one single cheese that I would like to eat all the time, exclusively. That would make for a pretty dull world.

I also would not like to eat only one meat, one vegetable, etc ....
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline  
Old 05-23-2006, 02:41 AM   #40
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Is it safe to say how much I HATE spam?!!! It had become a staple in the UK during the war, I believe. We had rationing until mid-50s for some things (no, I don't remember those days..!!!) and it became a standby for sandwiches etc - and was still being pushed onto the public well into the 60s. (Wonder if it's still for sale here? Can't remember when last I saw a can!)

I remember my school used to make spam fritters - slices of spam, dipped in batter and deep fried... That unnaturally PINK meat just made me shiver. I used to dread when it was fritter lunch as the nuns at my school insisted that we all clear our plates, in spite of the fact that so few of us liked the stuff... and still they kept cooking it!

And does anyone else remember the Monty Python 'Spam' sketch?
Ishbel is offline  
Closed Thread

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.