"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-01-2013, 08:21 AM   #21
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,946
Salt does lower the freezing point of water so it remains liquid at 32F rather than ice. That's why we salt our roads when it snows. Salted foods may not get frozen hard at 32F but will still be preserved.

However, once a food is chilled to a certain temperature, the bacterial activity that causes spoilage has been stopped and will remain stopped until the food temp is raised to a higher temperature.

I keep pounds of both salted and unsalted butters in my freezer and never noticed a difference in freshness after prolonged storage.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2013, 08:50 AM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,230
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
No. I'm not sure. It just doesn't make any sense logically to me.

Once butter is frozen, it's preserved. Done.

Both salted and unsalted butter freeze quite quickly in a modern freezer.

I can't imagine that unsalted keeps better in the freezer.

In the fridge or on the counter the salt matters more.

I wouldn't trust JoC for food science, so lets hope your sister can weigh in. If I have time later ill do some research
JoC was referring to periods of over six months. When I first read it, I thought it sounded so weird that I thought about it a lot. All the bits of food science I have read in JoC that I have bothered to check on have been correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Salt does lower the freezing point of water so it remains liquid at 32F rather than ice. That's why we salt our roads when it snows. Salted foods may not get frozen hard at 32F but will still be preserved.

However, once a food is chilled to a certain temperature, the bacterial activity that causes spoilage has been stopped and will remain stopped until the food temp is raised to a higher temperature.

I keep pounds of both salted and unsalted butters in my freezer and never noticed a difference in freshness after prolonged storage.
You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2013, 09:52 AM   #23
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 6,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Went shopping yesterday and the market had gotten in a shipment of 5 pound logs of Amish butter for $6. Very creamy and rich tasting. What to make, what to make?
Are you certain the butter is actually made by the Amish? I wouldn't be so sure. Take a look at this:

Amish Butter: Really?

I've also seen "Amish Country" or "Amish Style" on packaging here, but that doesn't carry any weight since there is no government standard that defines specific requirements for including the word "Amish" on the label. It might mean nothing more than the product was rolled into a log shape.
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2013, 09:55 AM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
JoC was referring to periods of over six months. When I first read it, I thought it sounded so weird that I thought about it a lot. All the bits of food science I have read in JoC that I have bothered to check on have been correct.



You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
Andy made my point much better that I did!
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2013, 10:00 AM   #25
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,946
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
...You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
Water will freeze @ 32F where salted water won't. At 0F salted water will also freeze depending on the salt concentration. BUT, whether or not the salted water is solid ice, slush or liquid, it's still at 0F so it is preserved and will not spoil. Freezing isn't required for preservation, low temperature is.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 02:04 AM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 13,975
Scones. As a bonus...THEY freeze well! If you are so inclined you can also use it to bake a butter crust pie. Crud, now I want pie...
__________________
You shouldnt wait to be senile before you become eccentric. Helene Truter

"Remember, all that matters in the end is getting the meal on the table." ~ Julia Child
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 06:13 AM   #27
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: northeast
Posts: 169
How about some different compound butters with garlic or any fresh or dried herbs?
__________________
''Good cooking is when things taste of what they are''
mysterychef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 11:10 AM   #28
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,820
Addie, I am in cow country out here in MO, and I never heard of chemically treated hay. Almost all pasture raised cattle eat hay in the winter, because grass doesn't grow when it is cold outside.

Hay is just dried grass, the same grass that the cows eat all summer. One field is for grazing, one for pasture--sometimes farmers even cut hay and then pasture. No chemicals, unless you are talking about fertilizer, and the fertilizer is used on hayfields and pastures.

About 'Amish' butter--I leave my butter out on the counter in a covered container, all year round. The only butter I have ever had mold was labeled 'Amish'. May have been a bad batch, but I have been cautious about it ever since.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 03:13 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Addie, I am in cow country out here in MO, and I never heard of chemically treated hay. Almost all pasture raised cattle eat hay in the winter, because grass doesn't grow when it is cold outside.

Hay is just dried grass, the same grass that the cows eat all summer. One field is for grazing, one for pasture--sometimes farmers even cut hay and then pasture. No chemicals, unless you are talking about fertilizer, and the fertilizer is used on hayfields and pastures.

About 'Amish' butter--I leave my butter out on the counter in a covered container, all year round. The only butter I have ever had mold was labeled 'Amish'. May have been a bad batch, but I have been cautious about it ever since.
The Amish tend to let the cow patties do the fertilizing. They don't use chemicals in their fields.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 03:36 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
The Amish tend to let the cow patties do the fertilizing. They don't use chemicals in their fields.
Actually, most of them do: Do Amish use pesticides? Most Amish farms are not organic, and most Amish farmers use a variety of pesticides and fertilizers

Mad Cook, I think, as someone mentioned earlier, there is a "mystique" about the Amish and their lifestyle that makes some people assume that they live as if it were 1850. They don't. But the myth allows them to command higher prices for their goods. It's excellent marketing
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 04:30 PM   #31
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,298
Great price for the butter.

What to do with it?

Toast, Cinnamon/Sugar toast, Cheese toast,
Garlic toast, Cookies, Heap on Baked Taters, and any way you normally use butter.

It freezes well so you can do that too.

The best thing to do with it is to enjoy it.
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2013, 04:14 PM   #32
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysterychef View Post
How about some different compound butters with garlic or any fresh or dried herbs?
Anything with high levels of salt or garlic eg bacon or garlic butter freeze OK and are safe to eat (assuming all other factors are OK) but the flavours start to go off - not "off" as in contaminated but just less pleasant to taste. I think the recommended time for keeping bacon in the freezer, say, is one month. It won't do you any harm after this but the longer you keep it frozen after the recommended time the less it keeps its flavour. Garlic can get to taste quite nasty if the product it's in is kept too long in the freezer

Butter may be the same although I haven't noticed it much.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2013, 04:20 PM   #33
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
The Amish do not treat their cows with hormones. And they are fed mostly grass, not chemically treated hay. So it makes their butter purer in the real sense. They do adhere to the laws of their State as to what the cows must be tested for before it can be sold to the public. Such as TB. And the milk or cream must be pasteurized also. But it is not ultra pasteurized. Ultra pasteurized is when it is pasteurized twice. I have no idea why, but it certainly kills the flavor of the product. Restaurants here do not use the ultra products. And you can really taste the difference.
Thanks, Addie. I thought it might be something like that. It probably makes the butter taste better too. Contented and healthy cows living as natural a life as is possible in captivity must produce better and more flavoursome milk and cream.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2013, 12:11 PM   #34
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,702
I know this is late----- but ghee (clarified butter) is one way to use up a lot of unsalted butter. Or if you ever buy more----- just send it to me. LOL
cave76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
butter

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.