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Old 10-04-2004, 06:54 AM   #21
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Hey, I didn't say I'd buy it for that price, only that this was probably the model you were looking at. It's hard to imagine any store marking it up by that much, especially in the time of the internet, where you could just ship it from somewhere else. I have shipped stuff from Australia before, and assuming the reverse is just as easy, your local applicance stores would go out of business pretty quickly if they tried charging that much.
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Old 10-04-2004, 07:16 AM   #22
 
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The trouble is they know not everybody is willing to risk Internet purchases, and then there are the warranty issues. I would rather wait until someone I knew was going over.
My son and his wife live in Cambodia and visit home every 6 months or so. He said his friend in America will pick one up if I need it and take it to Cambodia next time he goes, so it will be a well travelled machine. It's not just mixers, my son bought a laptop computer and saved absolutely heaps in the US.
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Old 10-04-2004, 12:14 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by jasonr
Wayne, I have never seen a recipe call for more than 15 minutes kneading total (hand or machine) and most recipes call for half that amount. (5-7 minutes is standard in most bread recipes, both from professional and amateur cookbooks) Given this, it makes no sense that this Sunbeam would require 15 minutes on top of whatever time it takes to knead in the first place, unless the machine is somehow magically unkneading the dough. Assuming the machine works like a standard stand mixer (with the dough hook), I would simply ignore the instructions and do what you normally do. A little hand kneading at the end is useful, but not for more than a minute, if even that.

I purchased a 300W 4 quart Kitchenaid stand mixer for $350.00 CA...Everyone I have ever spoken with agrees that Kitchenaids are supreme.
yeah - the Sunbeam instructions seem weird. I have a Hobart/Kitchenaid K5A (so ancient the bowl and attachments were all made from aluminum). What gripes me about Kitchenaid, though, is the design changes that have been made over time. OK, I understand switching to SS and even coating the paddle and dough hook with that white stuff but other changes don't seem like improvements to me.

Did you know that the current dough paddle is about 1" shorter than the original?


You can't make a single loaf recipe with the newer one b/c (unlike the old) its not long enough to reach the dough.

Then there's the stupid changes in the grain mill design. The original one had a round threaded opening so you could screw in any capacity jar and mill right into the jar - no muss, no fuss - and it was (and still is) easy to use a larger hopper or different size jars.


They changed the exterior design and really made it a lot less convenient.


and they modified the paddle design a little too - can't figure out why


I'm hoping my K5A will outlast me b/c if the motor ever goes I'd be clueless where to get it repaired. So far it's been like the energizer bunny - takes a licking and keeps on ticking!
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Old 10-04-2004, 01:05 PM   #24
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Kitchenaid Breadmaking Instructions circa 1985
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Old 10-04-2004, 06:26 PM   #25
 
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subfuscpersona, somebody posted recently about a Hobart mixer going cheap on eBay. They said all the parts and accessories were interchangeable.
I am not sure about motor bits. You may know better but worth a thought in case you need spares.
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Old 10-04-2004, 08:48 PM   #26
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I am glad I read this thread. I am sticking to using my hands or my breadmaker to make bread dough.
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Old 10-04-2004, 08:57 PM   #27
 
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I am glad I read this thread. I am sticking to using my hands or my breadmaker to make bread dough.
Maybe with a name like bangbang, stick to your guns and use what works for you. I sometimes wish I had not mentioned the word "Sunbeam" on this thread.
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Old 10-05-2004, 01:10 PM   #28
 
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Originally Posted by WayneT
subfuscpersona, somebody posted recently about a Hobart mixer going cheap on eBay. They said all the parts and accessories were interchangeable.
I am not sure about motor bits. You may know better but worth a thought in case you need spares.
Let me qualify that statement a bit, about all beater parts being interchangeable. A 5 qt beater will fit any 5 qt mixer, "If you have an older model Hobart kitchenaid". The same with all Hobart kitchenaid 4 qt beaters fitting all 4 qt mixers, etc.

Whirlpool has thrown a monkey in the works with some of their new mixers. They are not always interchangeable because Whirlpool has fiddled with the design of the beaters and bowls! :twisted:

Of course bowl based attachments depend on what size bowl your mixer has. You can not use a colander and sieve designed for a 5 qt mixer on a 4 qt bowl, and vice versa.

Now, the attachment hub attachments can be used by any Hobart or Whirlpool kitchenaids and also Hobart N-50 mixers. You may have to put a book under either the mixer or the ice cream maker if you have one of the old bucket ice cream makers to even out height differences.

There is only one exception to my knowledge -- one of the new Whirlpool Kitchenaids does not fit well the pasta roller attachment. Another one of Whirlpool's mad ideas to make folks buy their newest models!

If you check their forum, they are always encouraging people with good working Hobart Kitchenaids to trash them for the rinky dink clunkers! And they get complaints all the time!

I belong to a electric mixer collector's club, and if any other information comes to light, I will let you know.

Go to http://www.hobartcorp.com/hobartg5/pr/products.nsf/home for information on the nearest Hobart repair center! 8) They can also repair the new Whirlpool monsters, if you want to bother!

Any other questions? Just let me know!
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Old 10-05-2004, 04:06 PM   #29
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Go to www.hobart.com for information on the nearest Hobart repair center! Cool They can also repair the new Whirlpool monsters, if you want to bother!
did you mean http://www.hobartcorp.com/hobartg5/pr/products.nsf/home?

www.hobart.com takes me to a site that's under construction
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Old 10-05-2004, 05:13 PM   #30
 
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Yes. :? sorry
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Old 10-07-2004, 06:12 PM   #31
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Well, Wayne, I think I found an answer for you thanks to our old friend Alton Brown.

The problem is the mixer design - not the maker. The Sunbeam, and all other mixers based on that type design, do not create enough friction to knead the dough. They are essentially hand mixers stuck on a stand. They are good for mixing, whipping, and beating - which is good when making doughs that you don't want to develop the gluten in like cakes or pie crusts, pancake batter - but not for things where you have to develop the gluten such as breads, pasta, etc.

The other group of stand mixers that will create the friction with the dough hook rubbing the dough against the side of the bowl use planitary motion, and only use one whisk/beater/dough hook. Instead of the attachments being stationary and the bowl turning around (which is apparently where the friction is lost) the bowl is stationary and attachments move in two directions ... the attachment is moved around the bowl in one direction while it spins in the opposite direction. This is the way the Hobart/KitchenAid mixers work. Wolfgang Puck has come out with one, and so has an Italian company, DeLonghi, and I "think" I saw someone else had come out with one but I don't remember who or where I saw it.

Anyway - I hope this helps explain the difference in the mixers and why some will both mix and knead for you and others only do the mixing.
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Old 10-07-2004, 06:57 PM   #32
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Audeo - I wouldn't worry about the KitchenAid being able to handle your bread kneads - even as often as you bake bread. Just follow the instructions - if it says to let it rest between batches then I would but I don't remember seeing that in my manual for bread, but it does for the pasta extrusion plates, but I know that really stresses the motor the way the extrusion dies work and the density of the dough. Remember, there are commercial kitchens who use them everyday - and I'm sure they wouldn't if they didn't last. Watch the BIG cooking competions and see how many use KitchenAid. I'm sure they wouldn't if they didn't feel they could count on them.

You know how many watts power your KA has ... how many watts does the motor in your bread machine have? I've gone through the manuals on several bread machines and haven't found that information listed.
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Old 10-07-2004, 08:54 PM   #33
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Hmmm...going to check the wattages...
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Old 10-07-2004, 09:01 PM   #34
 
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I read somewhere in my mixer collecting forum, that it is not wattage that indicates the power of the machine, it is actually torque!

Now, I don't understand all of it, but I will quote the source for you in a minute.
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Old 10-07-2004, 09:06 PM   #35
 
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Ok. I found it in a post dated 10/6/04,

"Hello fellow Mixer Collectors:

The strength of an electric motor is not in how many watts it is rated. It
is the amount of torque it can produce.

Some manufacturers in the past actually have added current wasting circuitry to give you the impression you are buying a stronger motor. Others have added weight plates and made the "case" bigger to give you the imression there's a big motor inside.

Unfortunately, torque is not measured even by Consumer Reports. And mixers are not disassembled to reveal that to consumers."
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Old 10-07-2004, 09:13 PM   #36
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That's true choclatechef!

But nothing is advertised in ft/lbs torque - just watts or hp. For example - the Hobart N50 is only rated at 1/6 HP (about 167 watts) but due to it's gearing and the diameter of the copper wire in the windings in the induction motor , and maybe the size of the magnets in the shaft, too - it probably produces more tortue than the 525-watt KA.

What is advertised is mainly a matter of how many watts of energy a motor can produce. Some produce less HP but are more efficient at transferring that power into actual work. The true test is how effeciently that energy is used.

It's kind of like trying to compare Paul Bunion to the 7-Dwarfs. 8)
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Old 10-07-2004, 09:57 PM   #37
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With apoligies for the delay...emergency calls...

Hitachi bread machine: 680 watts
KitchenAid Pro: 525 watts

Hmmmm.....
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Old 10-07-2004, 11:26 PM   #38
 
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Well, Wayne, I think I found an answer for you thanks to our old friend Alton Brown.
Thanx for the effort you and the other guys have gone to. Helped greatly.
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Old 10-08-2004, 03:42 PM   #39
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Coincidentally.........a woman I know from another message board (all the women on the board had babies in Nov 2001) was looking into Kitchenaid Stand mixers. She lives in Canada and I was shocked to hear how much more expensive they were there than here. So I guess there really is a price differential.

For the record.......there would be "customs issues" with bringing one in from the states. my dh happens to work for customs here in Los Angeles.

Since the product would brought into Australia (and not the US), he doesn't know the specifics of the tax on home appliances such as this, but he suggested you look for Austraila's Customs website.

Also, here in the US, there is a promotion going on with kitchenaid accessories......30% off various accessories. I purchased a 2nd bowl. If anyone is interested the website is kitchenaid.com/mixers and the toll free # is 1-800-541-6390. The promo code is MIXER30

Good luck. I'm sorry they are pohibitively expensive in Australia. I've had mine for a year and a half and use it at least 3 times a week.
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Old 10-08-2004, 09:20 PM   #40
 
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Originally Posted by runninduo
Coincidentally.........a woman I know from another message board (all the women on the board had babies in Nov 2001) was looking into Kitchenaid Stand mixers. She lives in Canada and I was shocked to hear how much more expensive they were there than here. So I guess there really is a price differential.

For the record.......there would be "customs issues" with bringing one in from the states. my dh happens to work for customs here in Los Angeles.

Since the product would brought into Australia (and not the US), he doesn't know the specifics of the tax on home appliances such as this, but he suggested you look for Austraila's Customs website.

Also, here in the US, there is a promotion going on with kitchenaid accessories......30% off various accessories. I purchased a 2nd bowl. If anyone is interested the website is kitchenaid.com/mixers and the toll free # is 1-800-541-6390. The promo code is MIXER30

Good luck. I'm sorry they are pohibitively expensive in Australia. I've had mine for a year and a half and use it at least 3 times a week.
Hummm..... That being the case, I think that makes my idea of buying a vintage Hobart Kitchenaid on E-bay the wisest choice for a Canadian or Australian cook!

You get a better machine, and a much cheaper price all the way around! You could probably buy 4 to 6 vintage Kitchenaids for the price of one new one!
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