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Old 12-30-2019, 01:36 PM   #21
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I don't know about everyone else, but we don't have that kind of money to have food just sitting around. We have to pay for everything. A lot of you are lucky to be able to grow a lot of your own food. And don't forget, we are short on space. lol
I'm pretty sure everything that's sitting around was paid for... Some things like couscous and specialty rice I buy in large containers, so I always have them on hand. With my chronic health issues causing fatigue, I need to have easy options available.

We are fortunate to have an extra fridge and freezer in the sunroom off the kitchen for homegrown vegetables, homemade stock and meats bought on special.
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:03 PM   #22
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And when you buy that stuff on sale, you've spent less money, GG. I like buying "on sale".

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I don't know about everyone else, but we don't have that kind of money to have food just sitting around. We have to pay for everything. A lot of you are lucky to be able to grow a lot of your own food. And don't forget, we are short on space. lol
Well, I have storage space. My "pantry" is in the basement, which most FL homes don't have. I buy foods I use regularly (pasta, canned or bagged beans, broths and boullion, etc) when they are on sale, then stock my own shelving unit in the basement with these foods. That way I can cook popular meals on a whim without having to drive 8 miles to buy a box of pasta or a carton of broth. I also have a baker's rack that I use for baking supplies. Novel idea, I know but it was repurposed after holding Loverly's stuffed animals when she lived at home. While I usually restock it with supplies from the Amish bulk store on our trips to OH, I'm letting my supplies run down. I almost got the shakes passing the bags of flour by when we shopped in Amish country last week.
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Old 12-30-2019, 03:17 PM   #23
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CG, too funny. I think that is what happened to DH last week when I asked him to take it easy when he goes to the store. Our freezer keeps getting fuller and fuller. He finds it very hard to pass up a steak sale. lol
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Old 12-30-2019, 08:37 PM   #24
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Like some others have said, I often buy large quantities of things, to save money, and keep a lot of it stored in the basement. Early on, I found out which of the things don't keep well, without going rancid, even when vacuum sealed, so they are kept in the freezer - brown rice, wild rice, millet, and different types of cracked wheat (though whole wheats will keep just about forever). The rest I keep in tubs in the basement, most in vacuum sealed bags. Sometimes there are deals I can't pass up; sometimes, the prices on things go up, for whatever reasons, and I just go without them until the prices come down.
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:02 PM   #25
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Like some others have said, I often buy large quantities of things, to save money, and keep a lot of it stored in the basement. Early on, I found out which of the things don't keep well, without going rancid, even when vacuum sealed, so they are kept in the freezer - brown rice, wild rice, millet, and different types of cracked wheat (though whole wheats will keep just about forever). The rest I keep in tubs in the basement, most in vacuum sealed bags. Sometimes there are deals I can't pass up; sometimes, the prices on things go up, for whatever reasons, and I just go without them until the prices come down.
Right, as much as I love shrimp, crab, lobster, I ask DH not to buy them for me unless they are on sale and at a real good price.
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Old 12-30-2019, 10:08 PM   #26
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Just got back from visiting my FIL who has become rather frail this past year. Threw out apple cider vinegar from 2014 that was off color and odor, 2 bottles of orange crush from 2015, 2 bottles of salad dressing from 2014. He's going to be moving into assisted living this summer so I'm sure we'll find more.
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Old 12-31-2019, 05:52 AM   #27
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I'm guilty of having lots of old stuff in the freezer and pantry. Trying to make an effort to get everything used up or thrown out. Hate to be wasteful.
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Old 12-31-2019, 01:15 PM   #28
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From https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...y-meaningless/

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Last year, Mom’s Organic Market founder and chief executive Scott Nash did something many of us are afraid to do: He ate a cup of yogurt months after its expiration date. Then tortillas a year past their expiration date. “I mean, I ate heavy cream I think 10 weeks past date,” Nash said, “and then meat sometimes a good month past its date. It didn’t smell bad. Rinse it off, good to go.” It was all part of his year-long experiment to test the limits of food that had passed its expiration date. In the video above, we interviewed Nash about his experiment and examined where expiration dates come from and what they really mean.

It turns out that the dates on our food labels do not have much to do with food safety. In many cases, expiration dates do not indicate when the food stops being safe to eat — rather, they tell you when the manufacturer thinks that product will stop looking and tasting its best. Some foods, such as deli meats, unpasteurized milk and cheese, and prepared foods such as potato salad that you do not reheat, probably should be tossed after their use-by dates for safety reasons.

Tossing out a perfectly edible cup of yogurt every once in a while does not seem that bad. But it adds up. According to a survey by the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic, the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, and the National Consumers League, 84 percent of consumers at least occasionally throw out food because it is close to or past its package date, and over one third (37 percent) say they always or usually do so. That food waste in landfills generates carbon dioxide and methane, a greenhouse gas 28 to 36 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. And you are not just wasting calories and money. You are wasting all the resources that went into growing, packaging and transporting that food.

The FDA, researchers and the grocery manufacturing industry largely agree on an initial solution to this particular part of the food waste problem: clearer package-date labels. In 2017, the grocery industry, led by the Grocery Manufacturers Association and the Food Marketing Institute, announced a voluntary standard on food-date labeling. They narrowed the plethora of date-label terms down to two: “best if used by” and “use by.” “Best if used by” describes product quality, meaning the product might not taste as good past the date but is safe to eat. “Use by” is for products that are highly perishable and should be used or tossed by that date. The FDA announced in May 2019 that it “strongly supports” the GMA and FMI efforts to use the “best if used by” label to designate food quality. When it comes to food safety, the FDA said manufacturers can put whatever terminology they want to convey health risk. But while the FDA is encouraging manufacturers to use “best if used by” as a best practice, it is still not required by law. There is no federal law that requires dates on food, except for infant formula.
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Old 12-31-2019, 02:31 PM   #29
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Food manufacturers don't care if you throw their products away before you need to. That just means you go back to the store and buy some more. For many items, your nose is your best guide.
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Old 12-31-2019, 03:04 PM   #30
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Thank you GG.

But in my case, (I am sounding like a broken record lol) my pantry clean up campaign has to do mostly with space. Lot of our can goods could hang around for quite a while IF there was room for them.

DH just came back from the store with chicken thighs we need for dinner tonight. He did pretty good this time. Only spent $45 on some other things, but thankfully, none of it goes in the pantry. lol Oppps, I was wrong. A box of taco shells goes on the shelf, and a package of soft shells in the shape of a bowl, new item I think he said.
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Old 12-31-2019, 04:05 PM   #31
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Thank you GG.

But in my case, (I am sounding like a broken record lol) my pantry clean up campaign has to do mostly with space. Lot of our can goods could hang around for quite a while IF there was room for them.

DH just came back from the store with chicken thighs we need for dinner tonight. He did pretty good this time. Only spent $45 on some other things, but thankfully, none of it goes in the pantry. lol Oppps, I was wrong. A box of taco shells goes on the shelf, and a package of soft shells in the shape of a bowl, new item I think he said.
cookieee, I just offered this as a contribution to the conversation, not to anyone in particular. I thought it was interesting that this was published as we were discussing this.
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Old 12-31-2019, 04:37 PM   #32
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cookieee, I just offered this as a contribution to the conversation, not to anyone in particular. I thought it was interesting that this was published as we were discussing this.
GG, thank you, I found the article very interesting. Thank goodness the gentleman did not get sick.

We use expiration dates as a guideline (I'm sure like most of us do) and take it from there. Looks, taste, smell, etc. Our biggest problem nowadays is mold. We buy bread, rolls and such from the bakery in the store and they don't last very long. And sometimes we forget to put them in the freezer in time before the mold sets in.

Another problem we have is buying something out of the ordinary for a recipe we want to make and then never get around to making that recipe. And that ingredient just sits there. Anybody else do that?
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Old 12-31-2019, 09:40 PM   #33
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...

Another problem we have is buying something out of the ordinary for a recipe we want to make and then never get around to making that recipe. And that ingredient just sits there. Anybody else do that?
Do you mean like the wanton wrappers that have been in my freezer for I don't know how long? Or the pizza dough that has been there for months? It's one of the reasons I tend to buy spices as whole seeds and grind them myself right before using them. Whole seeds take a lot longer to go stale than already ground spices. Oh yeah, I have some spice blends that I made up for a recipe and only ever used it once. Now I have no idea how long it's been. I guess I should go through the herbs and spices and throw some stuff away. It would help with space.
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:37 PM   #34
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Do you mean like the wanton wrappers that have been in my freezer for I don't know how long? Or the pizza dough that has been there for months? It's one of the reasons I tend to buy spices as whole seeds and grind them myself right before using them. Whole seeds take a lot longer to go stale than already ground spices. Oh yeah, I have some spice blends that I made up for a recipe and only ever used it once. Now I have no idea how long it's been. I guess I should go through the herbs and spices and throw some stuff away. It would help with space.
Hi, you sure know what I am talking about. lol And the spice blends, boy do we have a lot of those. As much as we try to cut the recipe and make a smaller amount, there always seems to be enough left over that just seems a shame to through out, right? lol

Speaking of spice blends, last year or so, when I cleaned out the spice cabinet of outdated spices, I took a large glass coffee jar and all spices and herbs and blends that had seen better days, I put in the coffee jar. It made for a very different blend that was fun to use on a lot of different dishes for a while. As soon as I get the energy, I am going to do that again.
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Old 12-31-2019, 11:27 PM   #35
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...
Speaking of spice blends, last year or so, when I cleaned out the spice cabinet of outdated spices, I took a large glass coffee jar and all spices and herbs and blends that had seen better days, I put in the coffee jar. It made for a very different blend that was fun to use on a lot of different dishes for a while. As soon as I get the energy, I am going to do that again.
What sorts of things do you use them on? Do you just sprinkle it on top of something or do you cook it into something?
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Old 01-01-2020, 05:52 AM   #36
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This topic prompted me into action last night. Cleaned out my freezer, fridge, and pantry of old stuff. There were some items that were ten years old. Like others, I use the expiration date as a guideline but the sniff/eye test is how I actually decide what stuff to keep or discard.
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Old 01-01-2020, 10:57 AM   #37
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What sorts of things do you use them on? Do you just sprinkle it on top of something or do you cook it into something?
Both. My favorite thing is pressing them all over a burger and then grilling it.
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Old 01-01-2020, 11:13 AM   #38
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This topic prompted me into action last night. Cleaned out my freezer, fridge, and pantry of old stuff. There were some items that were ten years old. Like others, I use the expiration date as a guideline but the sniff/eye test is how I actually decide what stuff to keep or discard.
Hi bbqcoder, that must have been some project. Good going. Did you find anything that you would want to share here?
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Old 01-01-2020, 02:48 PM   #39
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Hi bbqcoder, that must have been some project. Good going. Did you find anything that you would want to share here?
Not sure what you are asking for. I just went through every single item in those locations and looked at the expiration date. If it was really old, it was thrown out (actually composted), no questions asked. In a couple of cases, the item was never opened but you could see that it started to separate. In one case, it was a spicy mustard that I bought for my wife but she never used it nor had any intention of using it. Another case was a small amount of wild rice that was over seven years old. In the freezer, many of the items were partially used frozen veggies that had freezer burns and congealed into a blob of ice.
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Old 01-01-2020, 05:10 PM   #40
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The only time I toss expired canned goods is when I finally accept the reality that I am never going to eat them (and shouldn't have bought them in the first place).

BTW, a lot of people take expired canned and dry goods to food banks. They are not allowed to distribute them. They HAVE to throw them away. So, don't do that.

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