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Old 01-12-2009, 02:17 PM   #1
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Coffee Dyeing?

I've been looking online on how to do this but I was wondering if anyone here has experience in doing this?

This is the item (the valance) I am hoping to dye a light cream color.....what do you think?



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Old 01-12-2009, 02:19 PM   #2
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hmmm! very pretty the way it is
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:20 PM   #3
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but it might look pretty in cream color too
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:21 PM   #4
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If you dyed it would it also change the colors of the flowers and leaves?...

Do you dye with coffee the same way you do with tea?

HAVE FUN!!!! : )
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:22 PM   #5
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Dee, one thing to consider when dyeing any fabric is the synthetic-to-cotton content. Synthetics (polyester, etc.) don't accept dye as readily as cotton.

If you have a piece of the fabric (a tieback, for example) that you can test, I would recommend doing that to see how successful your dyeing attempt would be.

Tea is another household thing that is used for dyeing, too.

Coffee and tea will alter the color of fabric, but won't be as permanent as chemical dyes. In time, the color will wash away.

Have fun with your project, though, and let us know how it turns out.
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Old 01-12-2009, 02:27 PM   #6
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well thats my problem...I've never done this before and I don't want to ruin it....and I like it in the white but cream would match my daughters bedding better. I was looking into the tea dying as well but I thought that might give a slightly more yellowish look so I wondered if the coffe might work better.
I havent received the valance yet, its being delivered so I'll have to check out the matieral when I get it. I was hoping the coffee dye might be a fool proof way to soften the white....?

And wow...you guys are fast!!! thanks for the replies!! :)
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Old 01-12-2009, 03:55 PM   #7
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here is the bedding material I am trying to get it to blend more with....
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Old 01-12-2009, 04:04 PM   #8
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That bedding is lovely, I'd think the white would work, I have similar in mostly blue and use white with it...I'd set it up and then take a good log loo before changing..
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Old 01-12-2009, 04:31 PM   #9
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If you do decide to try and dye it, I would start with it in the coffee or tea bath for only a minute at first and then take it out and rinse immediately and see if you like what it's doing. You can always put it back in for additional time.
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Old 01-12-2009, 04:47 PM   #10
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I would use the tea staining versus the coffee staining...maybe because I've never heard of using coffee before. Dyeing would definitely give it that vintage look.
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Old 01-12-2009, 05:56 PM   #11
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I used coffee last spring to dye reed for a basket I was weaving and it turned out wonderfully! It is darker than tea, however so if you are looking for a subtle change, it might be too much.

Having said that though, you can control the shade by boiling the coffee for a shorter amount of time. I think I boiled mine for about 45 minutes before I started dipping. If you do go with the coffee, make a pouch out of cheese cloth to hold the grounds. I forgot to do this so added a lot of time having to rinse them (grounds) off the reed.
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:00 PM   #12
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These are the instructions I found before...I am hoping though I wont have to dye it that I can leave it white...I guess I'll see when it arrives....by the way I bought this particular valance because it was 1.29 on ebay brand new!! Can't beat that!





Prepare the Coffee Dye

Step1
Brew a pot of coffee as you normally would.
Step2
Choose a container that when filled with water will allow your item to float and doesn’t require cramming the item into it in order to wet the entire item. The goal is even saturation and even color distribution. Fill the container with water.
Step3
Mix the coffee into the water.
Test Swatch

Step1
Conduct a swatch test. With coffee, this is important before dying your intended item so you can get a feel for how quickly the solution you’ve mixed will darken your fabric. Either cut a small piece of excess fabric from your item, or use a small amount of similar fabric.
Step2
Wet the fabric swatch with clear water and then submerge it in the coffee dye solution. Keep the fabric moving so that no creases or folds form that will allow excess color to accumulate. Keep checking the swatch for color depth.
Step3
Remove the item when you’re satisfied with the color and rinse it in clear water until the water runs clean.
Step4
Examine the swatch for color depth and consistency. Remember that the color will be lighter when the fabric is completely dry. Keeping this in mind, use the test swatch to determine if the fabric you want to dye will give you the result you want, and to decide approximately how long you will need to let it soak in order to achieve the right shade.
Dye Your Item

Step1
Soak your item in clear water so that it is wet through.
Step2
Shake the item out so that there are no folds or creases that might cause the coffee to absorb unevenly. Then submerge the item in the coffee dye.
Step3
Pull the item every few minutes to check for color depth, and in between checks keep the item moving to encourage even color saturation.
Step4
Remove the item from the dye and rinse in clear water until the water runs clean.
Step5
Wring out the excess water.
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:04 PM   #13
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This is the tip I saw that got me origionally thinking to try the coffee dye...


"I dyed an old childrens christening gown (about 50 years old) using left over coffee
Placed my gown in the sink
poured coffee over the dress, allowed to soak until desired color achieved
allowed to air dry
will be lighter when dry-very pretty ivory color achieved with NO Cost! "
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:17 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deelady View Post
This is the tip I saw that got me origionally thinking to try the coffee dye...


"I dyed an old childrens christening gown (about 50 years old) using left over coffee
Placed my gown in the sink
poured coffee over the dress, allowed to soak until desired color achieved
allowed to air dry
will be lighter when dry-very pretty ivory color achieved with NO Cost! "
Chances are the person achieved a good result because the christening gown was cotton or linen, which are natural fibers and would take the color well.
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Old 01-12-2009, 10:35 PM   #15
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Dee, I've been looking at this thread since you first posted, and your instructions.
Having quilted and dyed for years, the one thing I see missing is
to first wash your material and rinse with clean water. Then
start your process.
There are also 2 products you can probably find at fabric or yard shops to set your fabric color once you've reached your desired color.
1 is Synthrapol. The other; Retayne. There are differing views as to which is more appropriate after dying. And then the concept of using vinegar or salt to set dye. I use white vinegar, myself.
After dying, I wash it, then I soak fabric in a vinegar and water solution. Then completely rinse in cold water til I see no dying running and water is clear.
From the pic you posted (lovely print, by the way) it doesn't look like 100% cotton. So I don't know how the dye will take to it.

What about buying a twin sheet from the same pattern and making your own? I would line it to give it a more structured/finished look.
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