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Old 04-01-2020, 08:28 AM   #1
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Don't Throw Them Away!

Don't Throw Them Away!

When I was a teen, one of my best friends and I would hop in my stepfather's little boat and cross the river to set up a weekend fishing camp, made of a tarp to shelter us from the swampy ground, and a piece of canvas to shelter us from the hot sun, and rain. Of course if it got to warm, we'd just go swimming. The river was The St. Mary.s river, which is about 35 foot deep, and a half to 3/4's mile wide, and connects Lake Superior to Lake Huron. Fish were plentiful, especially yellow perch, small mouth bass, bullheads, and the occasional Northern Pike. To light up the night, we had the trusty Coleman Lantern, with the little air pump and white gas. But we often used cattails, diped in the boat's gas can. The cattail head absorbed a good amount of gas and made a great torch. At the time, we just didn't think that we were killing thousands of cattail seeds with every torch. So that brings me to this post.

You know those corn cobs left over from a good meal of corn on the cob, well those leftover cobs can be dried, soaked in melted paraffin, and used to make dandy torches. If you cut the cobs into 1/2 inch rounds, they can be used as fire starters for campfires, and charcoal grills. Any other tips besides compost that you can think o of for leftover kitchen stuff si welcome in this thread. And compost, worm boxes, etc., and how to make and use them would be welcome as well. Share what you know.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 04-01-2020, 11:47 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Don't Throw Them Away!

You know those corn cobs left over from a good meal of corn on the cob, well those leftover cobs can be dried, soaked in melted paraffin, and used to make dandy torches.
Or, in this frenzied time of paper product hoarding, you can stack them up in the outhouse and use them as our forefathers did, before the Sears catalog was invented.
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Old 04-01-2020, 03:12 PM   #3
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I don't recall details from reading Huck Finn/ Tom Sawyer long ago, but making corn cob pipes were a thing. Probably not PC today.

You can use sweet corn cobs to make a vegetarian stock.

You can make corn cob jelly. I think mature field corn cobs make a more rosy red jelly, cobs from sweet corn produce a lighter color. Google for recipes.

It's not sweet corn growing season here yet. The rhubarbs haven't even poked their noses out of the ground.
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