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Old 05-15-2011, 02:59 PM   #1
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School curriculum

Out of curiosity, what practical things do you think are really basic, that aren't taught in school, but absolutely should be?

- My mom had to teach me how to balance a checkbook. I graduated HS in 1973 and had taken algebra and advanced geometry, but she had to teach me how to balance a checkbook. Basic training instructors are still receiving 17-30 year olds who think that if there's a check in the checkbook, there is money in their account. Ouch.

- When I was a kid, girls took home ec, boys took shop. I went into the service, in a males-only field not knowing that you screw clockwise to get the screw in, counter to get it out. Both boys and girls should take basics in both. Now I hear some schools are dropping both for financial reasons, and in fact they're necessary life skills.

- Debt/credit management. Again, should be part of a basic math program.

What do you think?

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Old 05-15-2011, 03:09 PM   #2
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I agree with you Claire, there should be classes that get kids ready for life...who cares if they recite a soliloquy if they are unable to buy groceries, balance a checkbook or tighten a screw. There are so many helpless people out there, giving their money away to someone with simple skills.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:14 PM   #3
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Classes are good , but parents are better.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:15 PM   #4
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Yeah, once upon a time it was considered a parent's job to educate in these matters. Well, in this day of both parents working full time or more, or older parents who simply don't have the patience to teach these things, I think a class done in middle or early high school as a basic part of the curriculum might help a bit.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:40 PM   #5
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Doesn't it depend on the age group you're talking about? This is the way I would structure a curriculum:

Kindergarten - learning to socialize and play with others.

Early Grade School (Grades 1 - 6) let's get them reading, spelling, basic math, beginning civics and American history/geography.

Junior High (grades 7 - 8) Add Literature, more basic math, civics, American History Biographies (the people who shaped America.) Performing art (band, plays)

High School (grades 9 - 11) Add Foreign Languages, Home Economics, Art of all kinds, (drama, band, chorus, and industrial arts such as drafting), Trade School Shops (wood shop, automotive, etc.), Algebra, World History, Home Trades (cooking, sewing, crafts as a combined class)

High School (grade 12) Freedom to focus on ultimate educational goal, and make up on areas of weakness or failure from past semesters.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:56 PM   #6
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I like that you separated home economics from home trades, Selkie. Kids need to learn about the economics of food, as well as ways to prepare it.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:59 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Doesn't it depend on the age group you're talking about? This is the way I would structure a curriculum:

Kindergarten - learning to socialize and play with others.

Early Grade School (Grades 1 - 6) let's get them reading, spelling, basic math, beginning civics and American history/geography.

Junior High (grades 7 - 8) Add Literature, more basic math, civics, American History Biographies (the people who shaped America.) Performing art (band, plays)

High School (grades 9 - 11) Add Foreign Languages, Home Economics, Art of all kinds, (drama, band, chorus, and industrial arts such as drafting), Trade School Shops (wood shop, automotive, etc.), Algebra, World History, Home Trades (cooking, sewing, crafts as a combined class)

High School (grade 12) Freedom to focus on ultimate educational goal, and make up on areas of weakness or failure from past semesters.
Nope, it would never work...too sensible!
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Old 05-15-2011, 04:09 PM   #8
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Having two girls who are teachers, I agree with you Claire, but and it's a big but they are constantly sprnding time getting kids ready for these GD awful tests they both feel are worthless and spending money to buy things kids paents refuse or say they forgot to get them. These same parents are the ones who show up at a school with signs crying my kids are being denied after school time and football, basketball, soccor practise they can't have a teacher for arts and crafts, but who cares if they can boil water, let teacher do it!!!!! These same parents let their kids run rough shod over the teachers who cannot retaliate just grin and bear it. I my self feel you had these children please be responsible to and for them.
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Old 05-15-2011, 04:10 PM   #9
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Nope, it would never work...too sensible!
Plus they have to prep the kids for testing...
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Old 05-15-2011, 05:04 PM   #10
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we had a home ec. class in high school, didn't learn much there. however it was required to take "marriage and family living" in order to graduate. we were taught the basics , banking , learning to shop on a budget. how to grocery shop, write a check. don't think we were taught how to balance, though. some of it served us well. today with computers, etc it would be easier to teach a group. necessary i think. that was a long time ago, so not a new idea. just one that has been neglected.
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Old 05-15-2011, 05:31 PM   #11
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As a Mom who had the guts and determination to do it. I home schooled both of my boys.

I didn't appreciate at the time when my oldest was 7 and in a public school. His teacher felt the need to keep him dumbed down because the other kids in his class weren't able to read, write, or do basic math. Or speak English. That wasn't my problem or his. I had him well prepared before he even started Kindergarten. That was my responsibility.

If you want your kids taught in this state. Do it yourself.

If having a career for your own self gratification, to keep up with the Jone's 5 cars and a boat in the driveway. Well by all means do it. Not because we have to to survive back up story. Don't worry your kids in a public school. They will be taught exactly what the Government wants them to be taught. Johnny might not be able to read by the time he's in High school. That's ok to. If Johnny can play ball. They will carry his Educational Ball for him.

Here's an interesting article.

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Old 05-15-2011, 05:37 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Chef Munky View Post
As a Mom who had the guts and determination to do it. I home schooled both of my boys.

I didn't appreciate at the time when my oldest was 7 and in a public school. His teacher felt the need to keep him dumbed down because the other kids in his class weren't able to read, write, or do basic math. Or speak English. That wasn't my problem or his. I had him well prepared before he even started Kindergarten. That was my responsibility.

If you want your kids taught in this state. Do it yourself.

If having a career for your own self gratification, to keep up with the Jone's 5 cars and a boat in the driveway. Well by all means do it. Not because we have to to survive back up story. Don't worry your kids in a public school. They will be taught exactly what the Government wants them to be taught. Johnny might not be able to read by the time he's in High school. That's ok to. If Johnny can play ball. They will carry his Educational Ball for him.

Here's an interesting article.

I Quit, I Think - John Taylor Gatto
Way to go Munky, my daughter in law home schooled both of my older grand daughters. Both ar into Rodeo and can barrell race, rope, and ride like the wind but their education is spot on. Both garner all a and at times an a- we are so proud of these girls. Both smart beautiful and full of life. Home school I'd do it if it would help a child.
Good for you. Your the kind of parent I'd give a standing ovation
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Old 05-15-2011, 06:07 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef Munky View Post
As a Mom who had the guts and determination to do it. I home schooled both of my boys.

I didn't appreciate at the time when my oldest was 7 and in a public school. His teacher felt the need to keep him dumbed down because the other kids in his class weren't able to read, write, or do basic math. Or speak English. That wasn't my problem or his. I had him well prepared before he even started Kindergarten. That was my responsibility.

If you want your kids taught in this state. Do it yourself.

If having a career for your own self gratification, to keep up with the Jone's 5 cars and a boat in the driveway. Well by all means do it. Not because we have to to survive back up story. Don't worry your kids in a public school. They will be taught exactly what the Government wants them to be taught. Johnny might not be able to read by the time he's in High school. That's ok to. If Johnny can play ball. They will carry his Educational Ball for him.

Here's an interesting article.

I Quit, I Think - John Taylor Gatto
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:17 PM   #14
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claire, i'm not sure what you meant about older parents not having the patience to teach their children, but on face vslue i have to strongly disagree.

in my limited experience as an older parent, i find that i have tremendous patience with my son. even with other people's kids. i realized the latter when i joined the cub scouts with my son and was running the pack within a few months.

life can get you down at times, but all i have to do is hear my son or the scouts ask a question, or want to play something and any aggravation or stress in me washes away and i almost naturally drop everything (and sometimes have to make time for him/them - which i do with extreme prejudice) and i focus on the only thing that matters.

i'm not saying this because i'm some wonderful or gifted person, but rather i've found that the other older parents that we've understandably become close to are the same way. in fact, the top 4 or 5 kids in my son's kindergarten and first grade classes have older parents. it's coming down to the end of the year and my son is in the running for student of the year, along with other children all of older parents.

i think a large part is not only due to life experience, where you are more selfless because you've accomplished the things you might have (and haven't lol) wanted to have done, but a deeper appreciation for the greatest blessing one can have outside of one's own life. marriage is a very close second, where two become spiritually one, but a child is physically part of you and your soulmate. even understanding the depth and importance of what a soulmate means.

when i first noticed the success of my son's classmates and the age of their parents,i was curious about it. i've asked those parents what they've done to make their kids so smart and well behaved, and they all just seem to have taken the time to do what was needed with great understanding and patience.

ok, so to your query, i totally agree the school should be teaching the practical lessons you've mentioned (to be reinforced by the parents), along with other things that helps expand a child's mind. music was my first thought. i don't mean listening to or appreciation of, but reading sheet music and and playing an instrument.

it teaches timing, cooperation, math in a practical application, the appreciation of beauty, and the ability to be craetive.

lol, sorry i was so long winded. it's a matter close to my heart.
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Old 05-15-2011, 10:00 PM   #15
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Well, I can't comment on schooling in the US, but I'm more than satisfied with the schooling my girls are getting in our public school system. I have my own prejudices, and they have to do with the kind of teaching schools CAN'T do. They aren't allowed to teach morals or values anymore and believe me...kids need that. Teaching kids the golden rule is, IMO, one of the most important lessons they could learn. Basic manners and social graces should be taught as well. And yes, I agree that parents should ideally be the ones to teach those things.
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Old 05-15-2011, 10:09 PM   #16
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Way to go Munky, my daughter in law home schooled both of my older grand daughters. Both ar into Rodeo and can barrell race, rope, and ride like the wind but their education is spot on. Both garner all a and at times an a- we are so proud of these girls. Both smart beautiful and full of life. Home school I'd do it if it would help a child.
Good for you. Your the kind of parent I'd give a standing ovation
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Wow Kades I didn't know that.. That's awesome.
Another thing we have in common :) I'd be a proud Grandma to!

I didn't do it for the glory. It was a lot of hard dedicated work. It was my job to get it done.
They weren't allowed to type up the daily essays on a lap top. Or do math on a calculator. I made them use pencils, pens, and their minds to figure it out. No free rides around here. Go work for it. I was a mean teacher.. ;)

They, I think received more of an education from my husband and I then they ever would have around here in a public school. So much goes into it. Both have turned out to be very nice, thoughtful, trustworthy, well rounded,intelligent Men. I can't say that about some of the neighbors kids. They scare me..

My oldest graduates in 3 weeks. He's off to State Uni.
My youngest the one you met. Will be taking his Exit Exam to graduate early from High School next month. He's 16. He's really been cramming for that. I keep telling him not to worry. Do the best you can. He's incredibly shy, a little uncertain right now. But once once he gets going on it he will do just fine.

Sending you a pm about Phil's..

Munky.
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Old 05-16-2011, 05:08 AM   #17
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Ouch! Did not mean to trash all older parents. I DO know some who have much more patience for their second families than for their first, are retired so have time to spend with them, etc. It is all individual, and I'm sorry for lumping it together.

I am not a parent, I'll say that up front. I took 4 years of high school home ec for an "easy A", but have to say, I got much of what is previously mentioned from it. We had to spend one quarter working in a child care center (for teachers' kids). Every once in awhile husband or friend(s) will ask me, "How do you know that?" when I come up with odd nutritional facts or something about baby care. What my sister learned in "early childhood education" in college, I learned in high school home ec.

But I'm sadly disappointed to learn that kids still graduate from high school without being able to balance a checkbook or manage credit, and I think that should be a math class, and mandatory.
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