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Old 07-08-2020, 02:24 PM   #1
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Talking Strength Training Anyone?

For most of the last couple of years, I've been losing weight. Near the end of that now. Don't want to get much lighter but would like to get leaner. I've never been interested in weight lifting or bodybuilding. Truth be told, I've kind of held that whole world in contempt. But now it seems that's the direction I need to go to make any more progress.

Earlier this year I started working out at the YMCA but I no more than made a good start, when Covid19 put an end to it. Now I've got myself adjustable dumbbells and a home treadmill and I'm taking another run at it.

Wondering if there are any DC members with similar intentions or relevant experiences who wouldn't mind shedding some light on what seems to me to be a pretty murky arena.

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Old 07-09-2020, 08:40 AM   #2
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Strength training EVERYONE!!!!!!!

Truthfully, I prefer interval classes or Tabata type workout. But you do what works for you!
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Old 07-09-2020, 12:12 PM   #3
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Iím constantly carrying lumber and bags of concrete, and also lots of digging and landscaping in my back yard. Does that count?
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Old 07-09-2020, 12:24 PM   #4
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First, as a former certified personal trainer and senior fitness instructor, the difference between strength training and cardio training is, once you stop the cardio exercise, the calorie burning also stops while, because strength training tears down your muscles, causing them repair themselves, you will continue to burn calories for 24 to 48 hours AFTER you complete your strength training session. Just don't forget that you have to feed those muscles if you expect them to rebuild. My personal preference is the Zone 40-30-30 method, modifying it to 40% lean protein and 30% complex carbs and 30% fat with less than 10% of that saturated fat.

That said, if you want to "lean out" by means of strength training, use lighter than normal weight, increase the number of repetitions and double the sets. So if you are currently using 35 pound dumb bells, doing 3 sets of 10 repetitions, reduce the weight to, say, 25 pounds and do 5 sets of 15 repetitions. Just remember that speed kills (your exercise regimen), so take your time. Make your movements precise and use the same amount of time to lower the weight as you do to lift it. You might also want to try resistance bands as well as weights. You can find a multitude of resistance band full body workouts with a Google search.
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Old 07-09-2020, 01:47 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
First, as a former certified personal trainer and senior fitness instructor, the difference between strength training and cardio training is, once you stop the cardio exercise, the calorie burning also stops while, because strength training tears down your muscles, causing them repair themselves, you will continue to burn calories for 24 to 48 hours AFTER you complete your strength training session. Just don't forget that you have to feed those muscles if you expect them to rebuild. My personal preference is the Zone 40-30-30 method, modifying it to 40% lean protein and 30% complex carbs and 30% fat with less than 10% of that saturated fat.

That said, if you want to "lean out" by means of strength training, use lighter than normal weight, increase the number of repetitions and double the sets. So if you are currently using 35 pound dumb bells, doing 3 sets of 10 repetitions, reduce the weight to, say, 25 pounds and do 5 sets of 15 repetitions. Just remember that speed kills (your exercise regimen), so take your time. Make your movements precise and use the same amount of time to lower the weight as you do to lift it. You might also want to try resistance bands as well as weights. You can find a multitude of resistance band full body workouts with a Google search.
Thanks for taking the time to write all that down SirLoin. I've had my macro targets set at 40-30-30 for a while but it was more wish than promise with the calorie deficit I've been working at. Now with a bunch of extra calories in the budget, I'll have a lot more options. But I rarely get much above 100 grams of protein per day. Some of the internet experts are adamant that in order to add any muscle you need a minimum of 160 grams per day. I've also been bothered by their insistence that the only way to make progress is bulking and cutting. Really hoping not to ride that merry-go-round.

As far as adjusting the weights and reps I'm accustomed to: I'm most accustomed to the weight of a beer can. But I am learning. Was trying to increase weights too fast without paying enough attention to form. Lucky I didn't hurt myself. Lately, I've settled in on aiming for 3 sets of 12 reps for each movement, increasing weight when able to go past 12 reps with good form on the third set. I Will take your advise to decrease weight and increase reps and sets under advisement. You seem to suggest those changes if I'm "leaning out." Any way you could elaborate a little? For instance, how long does "lean out" last? How will I know when it's over? Or if it'd be easier, maybe suggest a book, article, or web site to turn to as a source reliable authority.

Anyway, I won't abuse the generosity of your advice with any more questions for now. Thanks again.
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Old 07-09-2020, 04:44 PM   #6
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light weight and increased reps will create lean muscle tissue (think Bruce Lee) while heavy weight and fewer reps will cause your muscles to bulk up (think a young Arnold Schwartzenegger).

As for protein, go ahead and aim for 160 grams. Your body burns up to 30% of calories digesting protein while it only burns 5 to 10% digesting carbs and 0 to 3% digesting fat, so the increased calories from the added protein won't necessarily cause you to gain weight. But it will cause you to gain muscle mass. Once you restore the glycogen in your muscles (the burn you feel in your muscles while exercising is you burning their glycogen stores) from the carbs you ingest, the protein can be used to fuel muscle building. Just be careful of your carb intake because your body will turn any excess carbs into sugar and store it in your body as fat, in the most embarrassing places it can find.
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Old 07-09-2020, 05:02 PM   #7
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What great explanation.
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Old 07-10-2020, 09:32 AM   #8
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light weight and increased reps will create lean muscle tissue (think Bruce Lee) while heavy weight and fewer reps will cause your muscles to bulk up (think a young Arnold Schwartzenegger).

As for protein, go ahead and aim for 160 grams. Your body burns up to 30% of calories digesting protein while it only burns 5 to 10% digesting carbs and 0 to 3% digesting fat, so the increased calories from the added protein won't necessarily cause you to gain weight. But it will cause you to gain muscle mass. Once you restore the glycogen in your muscles (the burn you feel in your muscles while exercising is you burning their glycogen stores) from the carbs you ingest, the protein can be used to fuel muscle building. Just be careful of your carb intake because your body will turn any excess carbs into sugar and store it in your body as fat, in the most embarrassing places it can find.
Extremely helpful.

Do you think bulking and cutting are necessary or even useful for an older novice like me?
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Old 07-10-2020, 12:04 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Iím constantly carrying lumber and bags of concrete, and also lots of digging and landscaping in my back yard. Does that count?
Damn straight!

Do you feel your muscles 'burning' while you are doing this? If so, you are tearing down muscle tissue. Once you relax, the muscles will start recovering, building them larger than they were before you started.
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Old 07-10-2020, 12:09 PM   #10
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Extremely helpful.

Do you think bulking and cutting are necessary or even useful for an older novice like me?
I don't know how old you are, but I started serious weight training in my early 50s, which was necessary if I was to get people to take me seriously as a trainer. There were times, after a serious resistance training session, that I would wake up in a pool of sweat because my muscles were working so hard to rebuild themselves while i was sleeping.

If I had it to do over, I think I would have just gone for the lean muscles and forget about being a personal trainer. I was making a lot more money as an engineering writer than I could possibly make as a fitness instructor. It was a great motivator though, being able to complete the training courses and get my certificates.
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Old 07-10-2020, 12:40 PM   #11
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Extremely helpful.

Do you think bulking and cutting are necessary or even useful for an older novice like me?
I don't know how old you are, but I started serious weight training in my early 50s, which was necessary if I was to get people to take me seriously as a trainer. There were times, after a serious resistance training session, that I would wake up in a pool of sweat because my muscles were working so hard to rebuild themselves while i was sleeping.

If I had it to do over, I think I would have just gone for the lean muscles and forget about being a personal trainer. I was making a lot more money as an engineering writer than I could possibly make as a fitness instructor. It was a great motivator though, being able to complete the training courses and get my certificates.

Now I am in my 70s, still recovering from major spinal surgery (I have a cage, a steel rod, and enough miscellaneous hardware in my spinal column to start my own Home Depot), and I am waiting for the gyms to reopen so I can just maintain my fitness level with strength training and cardio. I have 4 sets of five exercises each on the resistance machines to cover all of my muscle groups. I perform one set of five each day, followed by 30 minutes on the Lifecycle or treadmill.

Right now I am just trying to maintain by using resistance bands and walking. I was lucky to have an excellent rehab facility with terrific occupational and physical therapists. They pretty much forced me into exercising every day, seven days a week, for 6 weeks whether I wanted to or not, to help me recover from the surgery. I arrived at the facility on a stretcher and they moved me to a wheel chair, then to a walker, and finally to walking on my own, including up and down stairs, unassisted in six weeks.

They used to love to have me to cook for them as part of my occupational therapy. When I made carnitas enchiladas, ranch style beans and Mexican rice for them, I had five marriage proposals. Two of them were already married and one was recently engaged. Even though I am on the other side of the country now, I still keep in touch with them.
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Old 07-10-2020, 12:53 PM   #12
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In my late '60s.
Never expect to make a nickel off my physique.
Don't give a whit what anybody thinks.
...
Maybe I give half a whit.

So I'll keep ruminatin' over the matter but for now, think I'll leave things at three sets of 12. Up the protein minimum to 160 grams a day and see what happens in couple-three months without any bulk and cut crap.

Don't know if I can actually grow a chest but be interesting to find out. After all, don't have to worry about popping shirt buttons since they was bought to fit a fat guy.

Edited to add: Congratulations on your recovery, rehabilitation, and narrow matrimonial escape.
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