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Old 07-10-2012, 10:17 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
...Another tip for fresh pineapple is to rinse it after you cut it. The pineapple creates acid as a defense mechanism when you cut it, so if you rinse that off, it won't burn your lips and tongue :)

I didn't know that. Thanks.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:20 PM   #22
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Another tip for fresh pineapple is to rinse it after you cut it. The pineapple creates acid as a defense mechanism when you cut it, so if you rinse that off, it won't burn your lips and tongue :)
That is good info to remember. Thank you.
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Old 07-10-2012, 11:04 PM   #23
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I will eat fresh pineapple until my tongue is raw. Same with Kiwi. Thanks for the tip to rinse it, it may save me several layers of taste buds.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:57 AM   #24
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I will eat fresh pineapple until my tongue is raw. Same with Kiwi. Thanks for the tip to rinse it, it may save me several layers of taste buds.
Yep the rinsing trick has saved me many layers of skin!! Went to a friends house and ate a few pieces of grilled pineapple, and I couldn't believe my mouth was raw after just a couple pieces!! I had forgotten how acidic fresh pineapple is. I've gotten spoiled being able to eat the whole dang thing if I want to lol. Hope pineapples are on sale at the grocery store today... If they are I am definitely buying one! Hmm... Maybe I'll buy one anyway... Thaw out some chops, buy ingredients for pineapple and pork kabobs... Yep. That is happening.
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:34 PM   #25
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I like to cut the core in wedges and freeze them. Pineapple popsicles!!!
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:52 PM   #26
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Another trivium about grilling fresh pineapple:

Many people throw away the pineapple core because they think it's too tough. When you grill pineapple the whole piece becomes more tender, including the core.

My advice is to trim the husk of the fresh pineapple, then slice it into 1/4" to 1/2" discs, then grill them before further cutting. You may find the discs are ready to serve, or you may cut them into halves or quarters and leave the core attached, because the core will often be deliciously crunchy but not tough as in uncooked pineapples.'

Also, grilled pineapple slices may benefit from marinade. I don't have any tried and tested pineapple marinade recipes to offer at the present time. (Soy sauce and ginger may be compatible tastes...)
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:44 AM   #27
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Another trivium about grilling fresh pineapple:

Many people throw away the pineapple core because they think it's too tough. When you grill pineapple the whole piece becomes more tender, including the core.

My advice is to trim the husk of the fresh pineapple, then slice it into 1/4" to 1/2" discs, then grill them before further cutting. You may find the discs are ready to serve, or you may cut them into halves or quarters and leave the core attached, because the core will often be deliciously crunchy but not tough as in uncooked pineapples.'

Also, grilled pineapple slices may benefit from marinade. I don't have any tried and tested pineapple marinade recipes to offer at the present time. (Soy sauce and ginger may be compatible tastes...)
Franks red hot (or any similar hot sauce) is phenomenal on grilled pineapple. The spicy sweet flavor pairs great with chicken
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:05 AM   #28
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Another tip for fresh pineapple is to rinse it after you cut it. The pineapple creates acid as a defense mechanism when you cut it, so if you rinse that off, it won't burn your lips and tongue :)
Wouldn't the pineapple create acid as a defense mechanism when you chew it too?
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Old 07-12-2012, 12:08 PM   #29
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The pineapple creates acid as a defense mechanism when you cut it...
I'm dubious about your theory that the acid is some sort of defense mechanism. Could you provide a source for that?

More likely, the acid is just part of the plant's natural metabolism. It leaks out if you cut it, same as oranges. Both have high amounts of citric acid.

Anybody who wants less acid should select pineapples that are more ripe.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:20 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
I'm dubious about your theory that the acid is some sort of defense mechanism. Could you provide a source for that?

More likely, the acid is just part of the plant's natural metabolism. It leaks out if you cut it, same as oranges. Both have high amounts of citric acid.

Anybody who wants less acid should select pineapples that are more ripe.
Greg, I agree with you and so does Livestrong.com, though they also agree with Skittle68's recommendation to wash fresh cut pineapple:

How To Avoid Acid Burn From Eating Pineapple | LIVESTRONG.COM

There are some other useful recommendations in the article as well.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:36 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks
I'm dubious about your theory that the acid is some sort of defense mechanism. Could you provide a source for that?

More likely, the acid is just part of the plant's natural metabolism. It leaks out if you cut it, same as oranges. Both have high amounts of citric acid.

Anybody who wants less acid should select pineapples that are more ripe.
::shrug:: I'm just repeating what I was told at the plantation. While that seems like a fairly reliable source, I can no more provide documentation on it than I could if it was a comment made by a biology professor. Believe it, take it with a grain of salt, or disregard it as you see fit. BUT, try the rinsing tip, because it does work, and if you are that interested in the source of the acid, do some research.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:43 PM   #32
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::shrug:: I'm just repeating what I was told at the plantation. While that seems like a fairly reliable source, I can no more provide documentation on it than I could if it was a comment made by a biology professor. Believe it, take it with a grain of salt, or disregard it as you see fit. BUT, try the rinsing tip, because it does work, and if you are that interested in the source of the acid, do some research.
Ok couldn't resist a quick google. Here is a short excerpt from the first article I came across on the subject:

Why do pineapples produce an enzyme that tenderizes meat? It's a defense mechanism. The sap of the pineapple plant contains much higher concentrations of bromelin and can cause severe pain if eaten.

Dr. Ron Rusay has written a simple experiment to demonstrate protein degradation's role in kitchen chemistry.
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Old 07-12-2012, 04:09 PM   #33
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Pineapples don't continue to ripen after harvesting. Bananas, on the other hand, only ripen after being cut fro the tree.

Pulling leaves doesn't work. Sniff the bottom and decide.
Avacado is another fruit that will mature but not ripen on the tree.
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Old 07-12-2012, 06:18 PM   #34
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Greg, I agree with you and so does Livestrong.com, though they also agree with Skittle68's recommendation to wash fresh cut pineapple:

How To Avoid Acid Burn From Eating Pineapple | LIVESTRONG.COM

There are some other useful recommendations in the article as well.
I Googled my question before posting, I found Livestrong.com too. After reading a bit of their site I found enough scientific mistakes that I do not consider them authoritative, nor even a trustworthy site.

For example:

Quote:
Place the pineapple chunks or slices into a large bowl and sprinkle with a teaspoon of salt. Salt is highly basic, which counteracts the high pH of the pineapple. Using a small amount of salt won't alter the flavor of the pineapple but make it less acidic so it doesn't burn your tongue. If you're bothered by the idea of salt on your pineapple, soak the slices in salted water and rinse clean before eating. from Livewell.com
That is simply incorrect that a salt can counteract an acid. Furthermore salt (e.g. table salt) is not a base (i.e. not an alkaline), and it is most certainly not highly basic. If adding salt could neutralize an acid we would be adding salt to tomatoes to reduce their acidity. If you want to neutralize an acid you do it by adding an alkaline (AKA a base).

Quote:
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Ok couldn't resist a quick google. Here is a short excerpt from the first article I came across on the subject:

Why do pineapples produce an enzyme that tenderizes meat? It's a defense mechanism. The sap of the pineapple plant contains much higher concentrations of bromelin and can cause severe pain if eaten..
I Googled and found that article too. That is much more believable as far as supporting that bromelin is a defense mechanism. The article goes on to state that bromelin is found mainly in the stems and that there is an insignificant amount in the pineapple fruits themselves.

I'm not quarreling that washing isn't a good idea if the fruit is too acid for your taste. My quarrel is that the acidity is any kind of defense mechanism. That's all.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:25 PM   #35
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Again, just quoting what I was told. Not saying it is, or isn't correct.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:37 PM   #36
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And I'm sorry for any dissent I've caused by asking questions. I think I've probably lost some popularity by questioning ideas, but I want to know what is true. Since joining the forum here I have had some of my own accepted beliefs changed, because I was wrong in my previous beliefs.

One thing I know for sure, I'm always wrong about something.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:56 PM   #37
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ok, i'll take the ball.

i've been buying a variety of pineapples called "golden ripe", and in the market tey start off green, then progress towards golden, then briwn.

i've found after eating dozens of them over the past few years (we rally like pineapple) the green ones are slightly more dry and less sweet, the golden/green ones are sweet and juicy, anx the fully golden/brown ones would be good for a still, and also are affected by gravity. that is that the juices in a fully golden pineapple seem to pool on whatever is the down side in which it was stored.

so no one can tell me that this variety does not ripen after picking.

i know what i've cut and eaten.
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:04 PM   #38
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ok, i'll take the ball.

i've been buying a variety of pineapples called "golden ripe", and in the market tey start off green, then progress towards golden, then briwn.

i've found after eating dozens of them over the past few years (we rally like pineapple) the green ones are slightly more dry and less sweet, the golden/green ones are sweet and juicy, anx the fully golden/brown ones would be good for a still, and also are affected by gravity. that is that the juices in a fully golden pineapple seem to pool on whatever is the down side in which it was stored.

so no one can tell me that this variety does not ripen after picking.

i know what i've cut and eaten.
BT, I was gonna tackle that one too when I saw it posted that pineapples don't ripen after they're picked. That is totally opposite to my own personal experience, in that I've seen them perceptibly ripen in my own kitchen. I was already taking heat on the topic regarding pineapple acid as a defensive mechanism, and I didn't want to start a "whole world vs. Greg" war over the defensive measures plus the ripening thing too.

Pineapples definitely ripen after they're picked. I agree too with your comments regarding gravity and the lower part ripening more quickly.
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:17 PM   #39
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we need ro develop a gastronomically caustic defense mechanism a.s.a.p., and then let it go as we age!
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Old 07-12-2012, 11:34 PM   #40
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One of my friends has earned a nick name "meth man" because of his love of beans as a defense mechanism, but that's another topic.
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