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Old 02-19-2008, 04:34 AM   #1
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Garlic - chopped or pressed?

A big hello to everyone

Some recipes call for chopped garlic and some for pressed.

Why is that?

After using a garlic press there is something that looks like a layer of skin inside.

I imagine it's OK to use this as I peel the garlic before pressing it, but is it OK?

thanks,

Mike

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Old 02-19-2008, 07:19 AM   #2
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It's OK. It just means the press can't push all the garlic through the holes.

Pressing is equal to a fine mince followed by a good mashing with the side of a knife.
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Old 02-19-2008, 07:59 AM   #3
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I've become quite the fan of using a microplane instead of pressing my garlic.
Don't have to waste the "skin" that remains in the press!
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Old 02-19-2008, 08:22 AM   #4
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After much experimenting, I have also come to find the microplane quick handy and nice.
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Old 02-19-2008, 10:56 AM   #5
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Microplane? No idea what that is, would like to know though. My idea of the difference between chopped and pressed garlic is that with chopped you get the garlic threads as well, but when pressed you don't. I realized this a while back(with ginger actually)some people don't like the threads(there are some very picky eaters out there...forgive me if you are one!) If, I have too use less than three cloves of garlic, I use a grater, it's easier to wash!
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Old 02-19-2008, 01:03 PM   #6
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The smaller you chop garlic the more intense the flavor. That's why some recipes call for anything from just lightly crushing but leaving the clove whole, to pressing garlic in a press. When you press garlic, it "melts" into the dish so you don't have pieces of garlic in your mouth but you have a mellower, but intense flavor in the dish.
I prefer to crush with a garlic press than microplaning but it's all up to the individual. Here are a couple of microplanes:
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Old 02-19-2008, 02:10 PM   #7
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. Here are a couple of microplanes:
Thanks for pics. It's not what I imagined they looked like. Now I know.
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Old 02-19-2008, 02:44 PM   #8
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Thanks for pics. It's not what I imagined they looked like. Now I know.
I've only ever thought of the last one as a microplane. The others I just think of as graters because that's all I've ever seen them sold as.

Generally when the recipe calls for different ways of using garlic, the reason is because you'll have chunks or it will burn and turn bitter if you use the wrong cut. Bitter garlic can ruin a whole recipe.
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Old 02-19-2008, 04:32 PM   #9
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Like that proverbial attorney's response, "that depends."

Pressing or crushing will release much more of the oil and essence of the garlic, slicing & cutting will leave much of it intact with the morsels. So the variation in the recipe often depends on the goal of the recipe, IMHO.

Whatever you do, don't overcook the garlic. It will foul the dish.
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Old 02-19-2008, 04:43 PM   #10
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I've only ever thought of the last one as a microplane. The others I just think of as graters because that's all I've ever seen them sold as.

Generally when the recipe calls for different ways of using garlic, the reason is because you'll have chunks or it will burn and turn bitter if you use the wrong cut. Bitter garlic can ruin a whole recipe.
Garlic will burn and turn bitter no matter which cut you use. It cooks very fast and should only be "sweated" over low heat for about 30 seconds maximum. If garlic burns or turns dark brown you need to throw out the garlic and the oil you browned it in and start over or your dish will totally ruin.
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Old 02-19-2008, 05:08 PM   #11
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Garlic will burn and turn bitter no matter which cut you use. It cooks very fast and should only be "sweated" over low heat for about 30 seconds maximum. If garlic burns or turns dark brown you need to throw out the garlic and the oil you browned it in and start over or your dish will totally ruin.
You seem to be misinterpreting what I said I didn't say anything about browning or oil or anything. I said the cut is specific to the cooking method and it is.
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Old 02-19-2008, 05:17 PM   #12
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Like pugger, it depends on what I'm cooking. I have a garlic press and several microplaners. Only problem I have with microplaning garlic is trying not to hurt myself.
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:46 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DramaQueen View Post
The smaller you chop garlic the more intense the flavor. That's why some recipes call for anything from just lightly crushing but leaving the clove whole, to pressing garlic in a press. When you press garlic, it "melts" into the dish so you don't have pieces of garlic in your mouth but you have a mellower, but intense flavor in the dish.
I prefer to crush with a garlic press than microplaning but it's all up to the individual. Here are a couple of microplanes:
I can see how you hold a 'microplane' but how do you hold the clove of garlic?

I have a hard enough time grating tomatoes

Mike
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Old 02-20-2008, 02:06 AM   #14
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absolutly pressed - you get all that lovely garlic juice and not hard lumpy bits - though i often finely chop after pressing!
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Old 02-20-2008, 06:13 AM   #15
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i always tend to chop garlic myself, less waashing up that way
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Old 02-20-2008, 11:11 AM   #16
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I can see how you hold a 'microplane' but how do you hold the clove of garlic?

I have a hard enough time grating tomatoes

Mike
Grating tomatoes? How do you grate a tomato? Why?

As for garlic, simple answer is VERY CAREFULLY. I've never had much luck grating more than half a piece but I have long nails.
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Old 02-20-2008, 02:14 PM   #17
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Grating tomatoes? How do you grate a tomato? Why?

As for garlic, simple answer is VERY CAREFULLY. I've never had much luck grating more than half a piece but I have long nails.
I have to ask the same question: I never heard of anyone grating a tomato and don't think it's even possible since tomatoes are very soft and don't actually grate. My question is - why are you grating tomatoes?
As for the garlic, you hold the clove in one hand, the grater in the other and just bring the garlic clove up and down the blades. You won't be able to grate the entire clove without grating part of your fingers so don't even try. LOL.
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Old 02-20-2008, 03:54 PM   #18
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Grating tomatoes? How do you grate a tomato? Why?
A Sephardi favorite. No Middle Eastern restaurant menu is complete without it, though Hungarians also delight in this dish with the addition of lots of paprika. Leshakshek means "to shake" in Hebrew. Every cook from North Africa has his or her own personal version of this egg and tomato dish.

1 lg. onion (finely chopped)
4 eggs
cooking oil
6 medium tomatoes
salt and pepper to taste

In a large frying pan, saute onion until lightly browned. Grate tomatoes on largest holes of a grater. Mix grated tomatoes and onion, cover and cook over low heat for 25 minutes. Remove cover and break eggs over the surface. Stir gently to break yolks, cover and cook for about 3 or 4 minutes until eggs are set. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Variations: One minced garlic clove may be added to the onion, or 3 to 4 slices of red pimento may be sauteed with the onion.



I had it for breakfast today

Mike
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Old 02-20-2008, 04:25 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by redmike View Post
A Sephardi favorite. No Middle Eastern restaurant menu is complete without it, though Hungarians also delight in this dish with the addition of lots of paprika. Leshakshek means "to shake" in Hebrew. Every cook from North Africa has his or her own personal version of this egg and tomato dish.

1 lg. onion (finely chopped)
4 eggs
cooking oil
6 medium tomatoes
salt and pepper to taste

In a large frying pan, saute onion until lightly browned. Grate tomatoes on largest holes of a grater. Mix grated tomatoes and onion, cover and cook over low heat for 25 minutes. Remove cover and break eggs over the surface. Stir gently to break yolks, cover and cook for about 3 or 4 minutes until eggs are set. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Variations: One minced garlic clove may be added to the onion, or 3 to 4 slices of red pimento may be sauteed with the onion.



I had it for breakfast today

Mike

My dad used to love a version of this dish for Sunday night supper. I never could stand it. However, I loved the fried eggs buried in yogurt laced with lots of minced garlic.
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Old 02-20-2008, 05:25 PM   #20
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Is there a special tomato involved? All the tomatoes I've used would never grate they'd just squish.
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