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Old 12-07-2006, 04:55 AM   #1
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I love camping

I graduated this year and got my first job, but to find it's not as great as I expected. Everything seems boring for quite a long time, but now I have found new fun in my outdoor life. It's fantastic! Hope more people will fall in love this sports:)

However, I just got a second-hand backpack and even don't have a tent yet.


I wonder where you guys buy your outdoor equipment, could you recommend some good stores?
http://www.opentip.com/catalog/Campi...ring-1_11.html
I got this from my friend, but not sure if really that good.
Hope we can exchange more useful info here, that's why I join in today.

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Old 12-07-2006, 06:46 AM   #2
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Take a look at Campmor. I'm sure they have a website now, but we have bought many a piece of camping equipment from the catalog. They have good prices
If you want top of the line, the REI, LLBean, Cabela's are all good.
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Old 12-07-2006, 07:25 AM   #3
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Don't know if you are close to a Bass Pro Shop but you mght look there too.
Am pretty sure they have a web site...online catalog etc.
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Old 12-07-2006, 10:29 AM   #4
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They are a few stores based on outdoor equipment only.

If you live in ontario, there is a Bass Pro Shop - i think it's called, at this big mall... haha i forgot the mall name.


Welcome to DC.
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Old 12-07-2006, 10:31 AM   #5
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You might want to look into Gander Mountain or Cabella's, too. We have a Gander Mountain store in our area. It's packed with just about everything anyone could need for camping, hunting, fishing, etc. It's like a toy store for folks who enjoy the outdoors.
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Old 12-07-2006, 03:01 PM   #6
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Welcome to DC. I am sure you can find a website for camping equipment.

Good luck and have a wonderful day.
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Old 12-07-2006, 03:22 PM   #7
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try to find a REI store, they are a co-op so you get store credit at the end of the year, depending on the prifits. There private label equipment is very good, they also carry all of the major lines.
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Old 12-08-2006, 12:14 AM   #8
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What is you camping style? Day camping w/hiking, primative overnight w/tent setup, RV weekender, comfer buffer w/holiday inn.
New boring job: been there-did that.
Look for some campers in your area. Many of them have sites on the internet and post info about their camping trips.
Day camping is a really good place to start this time of year.
With camping, the possibilities are endless, places to go, things to see, stuff to do.
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Old 12-08-2006, 12:42 AM   #9
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Well if you are inventive enough you really can get away without all of the fan fair. It truly depends on your comfort level. Go to the good will and you would be amazed at what you can find. Anything in a pinch :)
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Old 12-08-2006, 07:15 AM   #10
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While I agree with galleywench somewhat, if you are using a tent you really want one that "works". And now, stores like WalMart and Target have a very good camping department.
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Old 12-08-2006, 08:20 AM   #11
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I buy my stuff from REI. I love camping and feel there is a world of difference between Good camping gear and bad camping gear. The quality stuff is pretty expensive, but well worth it in my opinion, especially when it comes to a tent. The difference between a good tent and a bad one is, among other things, staying dry. The worst thing, in my opinion, when camping is when your tent leaks. Not only do you get wet, but all your gear, clothes, and everything else gets wet. That is not fun.

Campmor is a great catelog as well. If I am not mistaken, they are basen in NJ and also have a store there. REI is in a lot of areas now. EMS is another good place to check out.
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Old 12-08-2006, 10:36 PM   #12
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Leaking is not the problem; it's when the tent "sweats" on the inside that causes problems. Opening the windows does not solve it.
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Old 12-09-2006, 02:31 AM   #13
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I cheat and use a camper.. It makes everything more convienent. Especially cooking..

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Old 12-09-2006, 05:01 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Leaking is not the problem; it's when the tent "sweats" on the inside that causes problems. Opening the windows does not solve it.
I have done a lot of camping--but a while ago. In very good tents and in not so good tents but always nylon. I don't think we ever had that happen. When and under what kind of conditions does this happen? We are beginning to camp with our grandson and I want to be prepared.

And since this is a cooking board also, I love camp cooking.
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Old 12-09-2006, 09:11 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Leaking is not the problem; it's when the tent "sweats" on the inside that causes problems. Opening the windows does not solve it.
When camping with inferior equipment I have often had leaking problems. Waking up after a rainstorm with 3 inches of water in your tent has nothing to do with the tent sweating, trust me.

Opening a window has always solved the condensation issue for me. Yes occasionally a tent will still sweat. The key is to never touch the inside of the tent if there is condensation on it. Once you touch it then it will drip down, but if you do not touch it then it will stay on the tent walls and not bother you.
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Old 12-09-2006, 09:58 AM   #16
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Yes occasionally a tent will still sweat. The key is to never touch the inside of the tent if there is condensation on it. Once you touch it then it will drip down, but if you do not touch it then it will stay on the tent walls and not bother you.

EXACTLY!! An interesting fact learned too late sometimes!! ;o) Actually, if your tent does not have a fly and it is raining do not touch the wet fabric. This also leads to capillary action through the tent and it will drip from there. That is more our experience, not interior condensation.
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Old 12-09-2006, 10:30 AM   #17
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boaboabo -

i've had over 30 years of hiking, rock climbing, and alpine experience, so here's my take.
first, this forum about finding your way around the kitchen, not the back country. there are more appropriate places to look for advice.

gearwise:
1 - forget that link you posted. you aren't likely to be meeting any orcs, so you're not likely to need a "mountaineering sword".
2 - forget about throwing you're money away at walmart, target or your local drugstore. these products are only marginally ok for kids camping in the back yard or people car-camping who can drive away when the sh!t hits the fan weatherwise. these products are not only extremely heavy and bulky, but will fall apart and leave you hypothermic if you look at them wrong.

someplace like cabelas, which aims at fisherman and hunters, is only a minor step up quality-wise. the main drawbacks are the weight and bulk, but corners have been cut on quality too.

discount places like campmor or sierra trading post can have good finds if you know exactly what you're looking for, but a lot of what they have is absolute cr^p too, so choose wisely here.

l.l.beans is ok on quality, but their products are too heavy and too expensive in general.

i'd recommend, in order of preferance, mec, rei, and maybe ems.

mec is based in canada. you have to become a member to buy. the main drawback, is that some items can't be shipped outside of canada. however, all their in-house products can be, and as far as the quality of the best of their products go, they are tops, bar none. their basic level items are at least as good as rei. prices are very competitive.
rei is a good place for novices to shop. their entry level items won't let you down. prices are good, but products are a bit heavier and bulkier than you would ideally want.

buy decent gear from mec or rei that won't leave you in the lurch. as it eventually wears out and you acquire some extra cash, you can upgrade to better, lighter, more compact gear in the future. read up on the gear you want before you shell out the clams.

other than gear selection, i'd advise you to not get in over your head, abilitywise. a lot of "mountaineering" accidents don't involve actual mountaineers at all, just empty-headed day-hikers in sneakers who don't happen to have lassie around to bail them out. if possible, find someone with lots of experience and no agenda, join a club or at least read up.

lastly, don't neglect learning about first aid and route finding. remember to be responsible and pack out what you pack in.

here are a few links that will get you headed in the right direction. read the reviews and ask these people on the forums for more detailed advice.

Outdoor Gear - Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC)
REI.com: Outdoor Gifts, Gear & Clothing for Skiing, Snowboarding, Camping, Hiking and More.
BackpackGearTest.org - Home Page
Mountaineering Forum - Forum Powered by eve community
The Mountaineers Books, Outdoor Books By The Experts

hope you have the best of time outdoors
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Old 12-21-2006, 06:03 PM   #18
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Add garage sales to what Galleywench said

Stroll through the campgrounds you stay at observing what othewrs are utilizing

Sounds like your blessed with time, =most valuable of all --Use it well
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Old 01-01-2007, 10:16 PM   #19
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I've found good stuff in many places. You just have to be on the look out for it. I got a great dutch oven at a grocery store that had some seasonal promos going, a tent at Walmart, misc cooking stuff at garage sales and GoodWill-type stores, and more specialty items at places like Cabellas, REI, etc. Keep a list in your wallet and be on the look out for what you want or need and you'll find equipment in many sources.
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