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Old 06-16-2019, 09:42 AM   #1
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Over-smoked meat

just got back from family reunion with two large bag of mixed smoked meat.


man, my cousin went a little wild. This meat tastes like it was smoked over railroad ties or something!


is there any way to get the Heavy smoke flavor off the meat?


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Old 06-16-2019, 10:06 AM   #2
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“They” say the smoke only penetrates a little below the surface. I guess you could trim off some of the surface meat/peel any sausages, etc.

Not sure how effective that would be.
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Old 06-16-2019, 11:17 AM   #3
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Agree with Andy. Trim off the outside.
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Old 06-16-2019, 12:30 PM   #4
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Trim off the surface, and use as an ingredient, in a long cooked soup, or something like that. You don't want to waste it!
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Old 06-17-2019, 09:08 AM   #5
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What wood was used and was it dry? Using "Green" wood or evergreen wood can create that creosote like taste. Mesquite can also produce a very harsh taste if used for smoking.

Generally wood smoke only penetrates a fraction of an inch and stops any penetration after about a couple of hours when the bark is usually complete with low and slow. Some who do hot and fast find the smoke penetration ends sooner than that.

As suggested, trimming the outer layer is the only solution at this point.
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Old 10-30-2019, 11:43 PM   #6
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Trim off the surface, and use as an ingredient, in a long cooked soup, or something like that. You don't want to waste it!
Twice that. For instance, add it in a pea soup or BBQ stew (I like this one).
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Old 01-06-2020, 01:24 AM   #7
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What wood was used and was it dry? Using "Green" wood or evergreen wood can create that creosote like taste. Mesquite can also produce a very harsh taste if used for smoking.

Generally wood smoke only penetrates a fraction of an inch and stops any penetration after about a couple of hours when the bark is usually complete with low and slow. Some who do hot and fast find the smoke penetration ends sooner than that.

As suggested, trimming the outer layer is the only solution at this point.
From my experience and research, fruitwoods do not need to be dried or aged and can be used directly off the tree. Woods like maple, oak, hickory, etc, do need to be aged and dried. I have used maple as soon as a couple of months after the tree fell from a storm.

Some woods can get very heavy-handed easy. Especially so with mesquite. One thing that can easily contribute to bitter and overly strong flavors from smoked foods is "dirty" smoke. The smoke should be light blue or almost clear. When the smoke is white and cloudy, it isn't getting enough oxygen and smoldering instead of burning. I have done smokes from as along as brisket to as quick and cold as brie with no water/ice pan using an offset charcoal smoker.
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Old 01-06-2020, 06:44 AM   #8
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Since the only fruit wood I have access to comes dried, I go by what other folks have suggested and from what I've read. Also from my learning curve experience with soaking chips and chunks, which I find creates an acrid, nasty, white smoke. So, I'll stick to what has worked for me for many decades. Thin blue only. I have a Horizon off-set pit, BGE and Weber charcoal grill.
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Old 01-06-2020, 01:01 PM   #9
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Cook it with a potato!

Just kidding. In my experience, if you think its oversmoked and acrid, there's pretty much no fixing it...
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Old 01-07-2020, 01:54 PM   #10
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I agree with Jennyema: "It's Cooked"
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Old 06-18-2020, 09:51 AM   #11
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I might be the cousin. I just love overcooking meat, it tastes so much better that way. Plus my mind's at ease knowing that I won't get digestion problems due to raw meat. A pet peeve of mine is when I get served undercooked food... eugh
Overcooked and over smoked are two very different issues.
You could be from my wife's family.
They have ruined every piece of meat they ever cooked.....lol
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Old 06-30-2020, 10:01 PM   #12
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How... uncouth! Roll_Bones, "Where's My Water?"? It's very funny! My... Comfortably rotund spouse is struggling to stand up!
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Old 07-02-2020, 11:39 AM   #13
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Does the meat have a dark almost blackened crust on it ? If so that is called a "bark" and is the rub applied to it before smoking it. It bonds with the smoke and meat juices during the cooking.

I see mesquite wood has been mentioned. It is a western wood and it has a flavor that not everyone likes. Hickory, Cherry, Maple, Apple, and even Oak are more poplar.

If this is the case you may scrape/wash this off and dry it in the fridge for a few hours. Then you may brush some BBQ sauce on it. If you still don't like heat it up some and pull it apart with a couple large forks and then add a little apple butter....but little at a time. This may make it edible for you.
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Old 07-02-2020, 01:59 PM   #14
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Does the meat have a dark almost blackened crust on it ? If so that is called a "bark" and is the rub applied to it before smoking it. It bonds with the smoke and meat juices during the cooking.

I see mesquite wood has been mentioned. It is a western wood and it has a flavor that not everyone likes. Hickory, Cherry, Maple, Apple, and even Oak are more poplar.

If this is the case you may scrape/wash this off and dry it in the fridge for a few hours. Then you may brush some BBQ sauce on it. If you still don't like heat it up some and pull it apart with a couple large forks and then add a little apple butter....but little at a time. This may make it edible for you.
There's bark and then there's carbon. We have a friend who oversmokes his chicken and it's all but inedible to me. When DH and I smoke meats, they have a beautiful, delicious bark that is very enjoyable. We made smoked spareribs Sunday.
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Old 07-02-2020, 08:36 PM   #15
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Agreed GG. I often wrap wet wood chips in aluminum foil with holes poked thru that foil for my smoking. This way the wood doesn't catch fire and soot the meat.

One note on the wet wood. When smoking with Pear wood it doesn't so easily absorb water. (if you try Pear wood)

On the meat I cook I often coat it with dijon mustard and allow it to dry in the fridge some before applying the rub. The rub seems to stick and stay put better during the smoking.

But a good instant read thermometer to temp the meat at the center is essential.

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Old 07-05-2020, 09:36 AM   #16
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Cook it with a potato!

Just kidding. In my experience, if you think its oversmoked and acrid, there's pretty much no fixing it...
I agree.
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Old 07-05-2020, 11:52 PM   #17
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Well that is quite a... degrading response! I'm sad! I'm depressed! My parents like overcooked meat though! They have bad taste! They also like eggs with squiggles! How... repulsive! I wouldn't eat it, bit it might taste good!
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Old 07-07-2020, 05:44 AM   #18
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Well that is quite a... degrading response! I'm sad! I'm depressed! My parents like overcooked meat though! They have bad taste! They also like eggs with squiggles! How... repulsive! I wouldn't eat it, bit it might taste good!
We're talking about over smoked meat not over cooked. Most large cuts of meat, done on a smoker, are seeking an internal temp of between 198F and 205F. These cuts of meat require a low and slow cook to make them tender, like brisket, shoulder clod and pork butt or shoulder.
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