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Old 01-01-2014, 11:03 AM   #1
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First whole turkey....

..... ever smoked. I have done turkey piece/parts but never a whole bird until today. Turned out good I think. Will have a better opinion once carved and served. Happy New Year!!!!!!!!!




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Old 01-01-2014, 01:06 PM   #2
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Wow! That looks good! What kind of wood did you use to smoke it?
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Old 01-01-2014, 01:43 PM   #3
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Beautiful bird.
How long did it take? If I remember it was 4-5 hours for my higher temp beer can bird. I'm curious on your temps and time.
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:01 PM   #4
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I hope your bird was as tasty as it looks. As to Pacanas' question, if that is an 18 lb bird, then at 11 minutes a pound, and pulling it at 160' F., then you'd be looking at 3 hours total cooking time, and then the 15 minutes resting period on top of that. Time varies a bit, depending on how hot the fire is, how cold it is outside, etc.

In any case, that bird looks good!

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Old 01-01-2014, 02:58 PM   #5
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Thanks Y'all!
I used hickory chunks in the Akorn. Cooked at 325* and took just under three hours. More pics.



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Old 01-01-2014, 05:51 PM   #6
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325 was higher than I expected. It sure worked though.
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
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325 was higher than I expected. It sure worked though.

I read or heard somewhere that poultry doesn't benefit from low and slow as meats do.
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:17 PM   #8
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I read or heard somewhere that poultry doesn't benefit from low and slow as meats do.
It think that is right. I have done plenty of chickens and always cooked at 325* or higher to keep the skin crisp. Figured the turkey should be done the same and turned out great.
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:44 PM   #9
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I read or heard somewhere that poultry doesn't benefit from low and slow as meats do.
From what I've read it's because of the skin. Some guys will crank up the heat towards the end to crisp it up.
I've done leg quarters at 225 before and the meat came out good. Nice and juicy. I knew I was would be discarding skin.
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Old 01-01-2014, 11:29 PM   #10
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I like how that bird shines. The turkey looks most excellent too.
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:38 AM   #11
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Looks great Paymaster! Nicely done!
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:47 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
From what I've read it's because of the skin. Some guys will crank up the heat towards the end to crisp it up.
I've done leg quarters at 225 before and the meat came out good. Nice and juicy. I knew I was would be discarding skin.
My wife when we first met always skinned her chicken pieces before cooking. I was raised to leave the skin on and I also eat the skin.

My question is regarding the seasoning when leaving the skin on, then removing it before serving.
Does the meat look naked with the skin and seasonings all gone?

My wife always removed the skin then seasoned the meat before cooking. This way the seasonings were present when serving.
Since I don't remove the skin, I don't have this issue.

Great looking turkey there Paymaster!!!!!
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:58 PM   #13
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In my case, Bones, I was only going for the smoked flavor. I had no other seasonings on the leg quarters and only left the skin on to prevent drying.
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Old 01-02-2014, 05:38 PM   #14
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I've roasted more turkeys on the Webber kettle than I can remember. They always come out wonderfully juicy and tender. I always pull them from the fire when they read 160' F., and let them rest between 15 and 20 minutes. The skin is buttered and seasoned before the bird is place btween twin beds of charcoal resting on either side of the grill. It's also salted. I use tag-alder, maple, or apple wood for the smoke, placed on top of the charcoal. A drip pan is placed between the charcoal beds and half filled with water. I light the charcoal, and when hot, place the bird over the drip pan. Put the lid on and close all vents half way. Cook for about 10 minutes per pound. The smoky flavor really gives the bird a wonderful flavor that needs very little seasoning, except a little salt, and maybe some black pepper.

If you want additional flavor, inject the bird with a good broth made from the neck, and giblets. Flavor the broth with salt and sage.

If you aren't looking for a smoky bird, then make it the same as above, but without the wood. Flavor the bird by brushing a lemon, or orange glaze on it every 30 minutes. Honey-mustard glaze works well also. Other glazes include bbq sauce, or a pineapple glaze. You could brush it with cranberry juice, or just a broth with herbs.

Paymaster has cooked his turkey to perfection. Try barbecuing a turkey. It's a truly wonderful thing.

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Alternately, you can stuff fresh herbs under the skin, or make a compound butter to rub under the skin.
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Old 01-03-2014, 05:29 AM   #15
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Looks good and juicy. Well done.
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Old 01-03-2014, 05:51 AM   #16
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Beautiful bird! I want to nosh on that wing.
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