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Old 03-18-2017, 03:33 PM   #1
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New Smoker needs guidance!

So my smoker(s) arrived yesterday. Followed advice from _____ and got the Cameron(s). Have read their included pamphlets/recipes. Read a gazillion other posts both here and at the 'smokers' forum I found mentioned here by _____.

My head is buzzing, where do I start? What would be considered the easiest to try as if I was in "cooking 101, smoking" the first year's beginning course.
Step one, wash new cooker, Step two, place wood chips in cooker. Step three, place drip tray on top, Step four, place rack/grate on top of drip tray,

Step five, fall apart because we don't know what meat/vegie/fish/seafood to choose and therefore which chips to use, yadda yadda yadda

Nor do we know because of step five - how long to cook 'em.

Aside from all of the above:-
almost my first question is on sausages... someone mentioned smoking Andouille sausages... are these raw? I thought Andouille sausages were already cooked and smoked as in a salami type sausage? or are they already cooked and just going to be smoked infused? or are they sausages the poster has made from scratch?

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Old 03-18-2017, 04:09 PM   #2
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Chicken and pork are easy to start with.

How long to cook? Cook until you hit the right internal temp. I use one of these to monitor smoker temp and meat temps. Smoke 2-Channel Alarm Thermometer | ThermoWorks
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Old 03-18-2017, 04:54 PM   #3
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What would be considered the easiest to try as if I was in "cooking 101, smoking" the first year's beginning course.
Pork butt!!! Almost impossible to mess up. Do NOT attempt brisket until you get really good at smoking.

Spare ribs are pretty forgiving. Maybe after the pork butt.

Oh, and smoked meatloaf is very good, and pretty quick and easy.

But definitely pork butt for a an easy novice smoke.

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Old 03-18-2017, 05:04 PM   #4
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Wow, thanks PowerPlantOp! I was just trying to figure out how to use my monitor in the smoker without cutting the wires...

You do realize this is an indoor smoker?

They do give some times for various meats, etc... (in the pamphlets) but truth to tell, I found the ones that sounded the easiest required marinating or brining for several hours, etc.

I guess I'm just a little overwhelmed, sitting here staring at this contraption, hoping that if I open it there will be a beautifully smoked salmon fillet ready for me to add some asparagus on the side and a fluffy scoop of rice or an iceberg salad (seeing as I'm supposed to be on a diet).
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:08 PM   #5
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Arghhh, Caseydog!!!! those sound wonderful!

NOW - SPECIFIC directions please? and pretty please?

Also... just to mention... I am not feeding the ranch... just me...

although I don't mind a "bit" of leftovers...
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:41 PM   #6
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Hmmmm, I've never even heard of an indoor smoker. Where does all the smoke go?

Also, I generally go for smaller cuts of meat, since I live alone. But, sometimes do a big cut if there is a good sale, and give smoked meat to friends and neighbors.

You can get a reasonable size pork butt, and if it is "bone-in," you have a built-in doneness thermometer. The blade bone will slide out with almost no effort when the meat is done.

I smoke my butt (ahem) at around 225-250 degrees for 8 to 10 hours, depending on size. That renders the inter-muscular fat giving you a really moist and tender piece of meat. Again, pork butt is VERY forgiving, so it is a good starter smoke.

Spare ribs take me about 4 to 5 hours. The way I know they are done is "the bend test." You pick up the rack of ribs with tongs from one end, and they should easily bend into a nice curve, with the top surface of the ribs just starting to crack as they bend.

A lot of smoking is little tricks like those. I have a probe thermometer, but I use it to gauge "feel" more than temperature. BBQ people often refer to "probe tender." That is the point in the cook when a probe thermometer glides into the meat, "like butter," as the saying goes.

There is also the "wubba-wubba" test. A perfectly cooked brisket, when poked with a finger, will "wubba-wubba" like a slab of Jello. LOL

Bottom line, just start smoking stuff. You'll get the hang of it in time.

CD
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:45 PM   #7
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The Cameron indoor smoker is a useful little thing. The smoke stays inside the smoker, you won't catch more than a whiff. You can also use it outside on the grill. And it doubles as a lasagna pan.
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:54 PM   #8
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The Cameron indoor smoker is a useful little thing. The smoke stays inside the smoker, you won't catch more than a whiff. You can also use it outside on the grill. And it doubles as a lasagna pan.
I just Googled it. Oh yeah, I have seen those on FoodTV -- I believe on Iron Chef America.

That probably not up to a 10-hour smoke. That would be good for fish, though. That and cold-smoking cheese.

I made my own cold smoker with an empty coffee can, a soldering iron, and some wood chips.

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Old 03-18-2017, 06:24 PM   #9
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New Smoker needs guidance!

Actually, you can smoke anything on the Cameron. If it doesn't fit under the lid, just tent it with foil. I'd start with some chicken parts or a couple pork chops. You'll still want to fry/bake/cook them all the way through after you smoke them unless it's fish. Maybe a potato and some veggies.
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Old 03-18-2017, 06:26 PM   #10
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According to their chart:-
3 lbs whole Chicken... 45 min. smoking + 45 min. oven
2 lbs Pork Ribs... 45 min./lb. smoking + 5 min. Broil/BBQ
4 lbs Leg of Lamb... 45 min. smoking + 90 min. oven

they also have a recipe for a 7 to 9 lb Goose... 1+1/2 hrs smoking - then oven at 375 til 190F (approx 2 hrs total)

I believe I read 'somewhere (G only knows where!) that there is a limit to how long to 'smoke' as it will not absorb after xxx length of time. So the above sort of makes sense, no?
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Old 03-18-2017, 06:28 PM   #11
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lol Thanks Dawglover, I took so long to compose my last post ... just saw yours! Yes I think you told me that before, or I read it somewhere. So size is not the problem... making up my mind is really just want someone to hold my hand for the first time.

Had enough for tonight... heading to Netflix to watch my Midsomer's Murders!
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Old 03-18-2017, 06:29 PM   #12
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You'll be fine, dragn! Play with it!

What chips did you get? It's actually more like sawdust, but doesn't take much. I have apple, hickory, mesquite, cherry.
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Old 03-18-2017, 07:05 PM   #13
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I believe I read 'somewhere (G only knows where!) that there is a limit to how long to 'smoke' as it will not absorb after xxx length of time. So the above sort of makes sense, no?
Well, yeah... basically. Some meats react to smoke differently than others. Chicken is a smoke sponge, so you need to go easy on the smoke. On the other hand, with a big pork butt, you can do a ten-hour smoke and only get smoke penetration less than an inch deep. That's why pulling the pork works -- you are mixing outside and inside meat. There is no way the smoke is getting to the middle.

I can see ribs working in that smoker. Get some smokey flavor going, and finish in the oven. When I do ribs outside, I use a wood chunks and charcoal mix for the first hour or two, and then just charcoal to finish the cook. You could do the same with the indoor smoker and an oven.

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Old 03-19-2017, 01:08 AM   #14
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I'd probably do veggies first. Some brown sugar tossed cauliflower would be a great first smoke.

For meat, I might try some country style boneless pork ribs. Smaller than a butt, but just as tasty. They smoke really well and easily.
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Old 03-19-2017, 01:40 AM   #15
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Remember to never light the end with the filter...
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:42 AM   #16
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I'd probably do veggies first. Some brown sugar tossed cauliflower would be a great first smoke.

For meat, I might try some country style boneless pork ribs. Smaller than a butt, but just as tasty. They smoke really well and easily.
That's a really good idea. I almost bought a pork butt yesterday, but they were all at least eight pounds and I don't have enough room in my freezer for that right now. But country-style ribs, Mmmm.

dragnlaw, while you're at it, put a dish of kosher salt in there. Smoked salt makes a nice finishing salt.

And for a summertime feeling, try this: http://www.achefslifeseries.com/recipes/1
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:52 AM   #17
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Good Morning All...

You've all made me feel a bit braver now, Thanks!

Vinylhanger, vegies sound good. I have some Brussels at the moment, halve them (think they're big), season c S&P. Toss with bacon when done? Guessing I could even put the bacon in the smoker too. Have a couple of stalks of asparagus.. maybe I'll wrap the bacon around them, put them in the centre and surround with the Brussels. 1/2 Tbsp. chips? don't have many vegies.

Dawglover, I ordered a 1 oz. of Oak, not realizing both sizes came with samples. So I have 2 oz. of Oak and 1 oz. of Hickory. I can certainly see Apple, Cherry and Mesquite in my future.

Princess? filter?

Salmon, Ribs, a Pork Tenderloin all on the list too. But as mentioned. slow and easy - just like cooking...
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:58 AM   #18
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GG arghhhh another TV/website to explore! there are not enuf hours in the day for me to read all these things. and thanks! love corn, looks delish!

Never had smoked salt, what a neat idea, sounds great!
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