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Old 07-14-2018, 04:35 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
Larry,

One thing I want to try is making seitan in my smoker. I want to use the oven method but do it in my smoker with a pan of water. Then when its cooked add my sauce. Not sure how its going to work but I plan on trying.

One other method I have seen is some one fried tempeh then added sauce to the pan.
Up until this past experiment , Ive only done seitan by boiling or cooking it in some kind of liquid. This was the baking method and actually turned out relatively good. Definitely a good starting point to build upon. Im curious to see how it will turn out using the smoker. Keep me updated.
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Old 07-14-2018, 04:41 PM   #22
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That's very regional, and even personal. I don't use sauce on my ribs. Carolina sauces are very different from Kansas City sauces... or Texas sauces.

.......

Like Craig already said, watch out for sugars, until you are almost done with your grilling. There is a fine line between caramelization and burnt.

If you can recreate the tooth and texture of ribs decently without meat, I salute you.

CD
Regional is a good thing. Its all new to me, so Im curious about everyones personal experiences or tastes. If it looks good to me on paper, Id be sure to try it out. Always looking to experience new tastes.

As far as the sugar thing, I kinda learned that the hard way. The grill doesnt always put out an even flame, so I'd say %80 was the finished caramelization I was looking for, then the other %20 was leaning towards burnt ( edible, but a little too 'caramelized for me ) Practice makes perfect. Just makes me want to try it again and do a better job. And not bad for a first time out.

As far as the texture goes, it will never be close, but Im just looking for something edible, not offensive with some chew to it. This experiment was pretty good.
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Old 07-14-2018, 04:46 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Regional is a good thing. Its all new to me, so Im curious about everyones personal experiences or tastes. If it looks good to me on paper, Id be sure to try it out. Always looking to experience new tastes.
Here's a really good roundup of the major regional barbecue sauces, along with a couple non-American ones, like a tropical one and an Asian one with hoisin sauce.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/07/...carolinas.html
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Old 07-14-2018, 05:06 PM   #24
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There are so many different flavor profiles for barbecue, that I think it really depends on what you find pleasing. Do you prefer something vinegary, or slightly sweet, or with a mustard tang, or...


I think (and remember, I’m no expert) that a really important part of any barbecue flavor profile is smoke. Will your faux ribs readily absorb the smoke flavor? Will you be able to cook them long enough with that purpose in mind? Barbecuing is usually a slow process, as opposed to grilling, which is usually pretty quick - hamburgers and steaks are grilled, pork butts, beef briskets, ribs are barbecued. To my mind, although both techniques take the smoke into consideration, barbecuing needs the smoke as an integral part of the the flavor profile. If whatever you’re cooking won’t stand up to a long, slow, smoky cook, you might want to consider using some liquid smoke.

I enjoy reading your posts, and find them eloquent and thought provoking. Don’t worry about typing too much!
Although the smoke has become a goal for barbecue, it is technically incidental to the actual process. The long low cooking method is primarily to tenderize the generally "cheap" cuts (not that cheap any more since that cuisine has become so popular) that are traditionally used for barbecue, and smoke just naturally builds up during the cooking over coals. Larry doesn't need to tenderize his concoctions, so that's irrelevant, and the smoke has to come from something else.

It's actually possible to add real smoke without the long process, since you can get a surface smoke treatment fairly quickly in a smoker or even a kettle type grill without over-cooking (I know that there is even a process called "cold smoking", but I know nothing about it). I've watched chefs on "Chopped!" use a stovetop smoker when they only have 30 minutes to do the whole dish.
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Old 07-14-2018, 05:38 PM   #25
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I've smoked corn along with a pork shoulder - it only takes about 20 minutes to get the smoke flavor on it.
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Old 07-14-2018, 06:41 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Here's a really good roundup of the major regional barbecue sauces, along with a couple non-American ones, like a tropical one and an Asian one with hoisin sauce.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/07/...carolinas.html
Great link, thanks
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Old 07-14-2018, 11:12 PM   #27
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larry, if you want smoke flavor without adding liquid (say, you make your own "ribs" and add in your own spices), I can highly recommend Smoke Powder from The Spice House. It is strong and goes a long, looong way, but very good. It comes in hickory and mesquite.

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Here's a really good roundup of the major regional barbecue sauces, along with a couple non-American ones, like a tropical one and an Asian one with hoisin sauce...
What, no Cleveland BBQ sauce? Where is the love?

Cleveland BBQ Sauce Recipe
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:20 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
larry, if you want smoke flavor without adding liquid (say, you make your own "ribs" and add in your own spices), I can highly recommend Smoke Powder from The Spice House. It is strong and goes a long, looong way, but very good. It comes in hickory and mesquite.


What, no Cleveland BBQ sauce? Where is the love?

Cleveland BBQ Sauce Recipe
Thanks, and dont worry, Im adding the Cleveland BBQ sauce to the list . It won't be overlooked

Showing the love
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:59 AM   #29
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I usually blend some kosher salt, fresh cracked black pepper, onion powder and a little garlic powder for a rub.

If I do use a basting sauce, I keep it simple and use a bottled sauce (either Bulls Eye or Jack Daniels) and add a couple of splashes of soy sauce to counter the sweetness. I also baste towards the end of cooking time, but I like to give the sauce enough time to adhere to the ribs and develop some of those little charred bits that I love.
Sounds like a great rub for brisket!
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