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Old 04-06-2005, 07:55 AM   #1
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Gday From Australia - Steaks

Gday from Australia, my first post. Ive done a bit of reading with the posts here, top stuff!

So, I want to improve my barbie resume. I recently experienced a *MAGIC* steak. I found out it had a special cooking process.

Q1. What would slow cooking ay 72c for 18 hours and then searing it on a barbie grill do? How is this different to just cooking it on the barbie?

Q2. Mate of mine says that the steak is dipped in melted butter after coming out of the slow cook oven but before going onto the searing grill. What would this do specifically?

Q3. A scotch fillet cut is the same as a rib eye cut?
Q3a. What is a prime rib steak cut?

Q4. I understand I need to purchase grain fed top quality meat.

Can anyone recommend a good book on grilling, barbies and meat. I dont want to have mates round at my joint and cook em up snags like I used too. I want to learn how to cook gourmet steaks to perfection.

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Old 04-06-2005, 08:12 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bathrone
Gday from Australia, my first post. Ive done a bit of reading with the posts here, top stuff!

So, I want to improve my barbie resume. I recently experienced a *MAGIC* steak. I found out it had a special cooking process.

Q1. What would slow cooking ay 72c for 18 hours and then searing it on a barbie grill do? How is this different to just cooking it on the barbie?
Answer: Cooking meat, "low and slow" like this, especially in a moist-heat method like smoking, in a crockpot with a little liquid, etc., will help tenderize the meat. Then, when you Sear the steak on a grill/barbie, you char the outside. The results are a fully-cooked, tender, steak with a charred exterior.
Personally, I like my steaks cooked to medium (warm, pink, center). This usually makes the steak rather tender, although not fully cooked.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bathrone
Q2. Mate of mine says that the steak is dipped in melted butter after coming out of the slow cook oven but before going onto the searing grill. What would this do specifically?
The butter will help caramelize the exterior surface of the steak, as well as add a little bit of flavor to it. I've done this before at a restaurant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bathrone
Q3. A scotch fillet cut is the same as a rib eye cut?
Q3a. What is a prime rib steak cut?
Actually, I've never heard of a "Scotch fillet cut". However, Ribeye steaks are cut from a Prime Rib roast. I have seen some Ribeyes that still have the bone attached, but I can't remember what they are called.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bathrone
Q4. I understand I need to purchase grain fed top quality meat.
Never be afraid to pay for quality. You will not be dissappointed. That said, if you're on a budget, buy the best you can afford. Depending on how you like your meat cooked (medium, rare, well done, etc.,) should really dictate what cut of steak you buy. The most tender cuts are Tenderloin, followed by Ribeye, then T-bone/Porterhouse (I could be mistaken about the last ones). If you buy a cheaper, tougher, cut, such as Sirloin, round steak, etc., and you cook them well done, expect to chew for awhile. Those cuts are best cooked medium.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bathrone
Can anyone recommend a good book on grilling, barbies and meat. I dont want to have mates round at my joint and cook em up snags like I used too. I want to learn how to cook gourmet steaks to perfection.
I've only got two cookbooks on grilling. "Thrill of the Grill" by Chris Schlesinger, and "Mad Butcher's Great Kiwi BBQ". Chris Schlesinger's book is American, so you'll have to convert some of the measurements. Mad Butcher's book is from New Zealand, and ought to play right into your hands. As I understand him, he's rather a popular figure there, and probably has more than one cookbook out.
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Old 04-06-2005, 08:29 AM   #3
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This might help???

Try:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...glance&s=books

I won't endeavor to answer some of your other questions.. sounds like you want to know how to grill a "pot roast"

Grilling a steak is basically a "no brainer"...

1. Start with a GOOD piece of meat at 3/4 (minimum) to 1 1/2 inches thick... at room temperature. BTW "prime" is merely a grade of meat here in the US.. has to do with the fat marbling and is hard/rare to find for us common folk.
2. Have your fire hot (500+... 600-700 degrees F or so is better).. hold your hand over the grill, it should go "One thousand One, One thousand T... OUCH!" ...charcoal preferred.. doubt you can get gas that hot anyway.
3. Salt and pepper your steak 15-20 minutes before you put them on. ( yes, it's okay to salt,, as long as it's not done hours before you cook.. and it draws a bit of the juices out to help caramelize the outside of the steak).
4. Sear on each side at 2-3 minutes, turn only once, if not done to your liking, move to a cooler part of your gill and wait until you see the slightest trace of juice appear on the top of your steak.. that will be medium, probably medium well but will have some pink inside.
5. Let your steak rest for at least 10 minutes before you cut it or you'll drain all the juices all over your plate.

Bear in mind this is all IMHO (just in case that's "In My Humble Opinion" :).. and that other's mileage may vary!

Good luck..
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Old 04-06-2005, 08:46 AM   #4
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You would not want to cook a regular cut steak for 18 hours.

Don't think you would even need to cook the whole ribeye that long either.
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Old 04-06-2005, 09:08 AM   #5
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Rainee...

"Don't think you would even need to cook the whole ribeye that long either"...

Yeah,, sounds like he wants to cook his roast until you can pull it like a pork butt or brisket or something??? Not sure I understand what he's looking to do here.... Anyway,

I've done a few Rib Roasts on my 22" Weber kettle... just like I cook a turkey or a couple of chickens. (or course a turkey takes much longer and I have to use the "minion" method for the charcoal)... but...

On my Weber kettle.. with the top vents open (always keep them open to avoid producing creosote), and my bottom vents virtually closed... my internal temp is 350-375 degrees. Using lump banked to one side with the roast, chickens, or turkey on the other side. A two rib roast takes about 1 3/4th hours as I recall, but I always measure by the temperature and how many beers are missing from my six-pack!

Be sure your top vent is on the OPPOSITE side of your charcoal.. so the air flows from the charcoal across the meat you're cooking. Not as important if you're not adding any smoke, but I toss a few dry chucks of Hickory in a foil pack, poke few small holes in the top of the foil, and put them on the coals...

Anyway, you're basically roasting in a 350 degree oven with a little smoke added if you wish.

I cheat and use one of those Maverick remote probe thermometers (some good buys on the net) which allow me to sit upstairs (up to 100 feet away or so) and monitor the temp of the meat without running downstairs and outside to continually check. Mine has two probes so I can also monitor the grill temp if I want.

I pull my rib roast off at about 125 degrees.. it goes up another 10 degrees or so as it rests.. giving me a medium rare roast...

Same should work for a Rib Eye (without the ribs) I'd think?? Food for thought anyway

But "grilling"... no way that would work I can see. Outside would be cremated before the middle of the roast was warm... ?
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Old 04-06-2005, 09:28 AM   #6
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Here is a whole boneless ribeye we cooked. I believe the ribeyes with bones are referred to as standing rib roasts.

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Old 04-06-2005, 09:29 AM   #7
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Then here it is sliced.


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Old 04-06-2005, 09:34 AM   #8
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Rainee...

Yep.. that's it!

I always prefer to cook them with the bones attached, aka standing rib roast, (better flavor) and the "Golden Lion" type cut some markets sell just aren't the same .. that's where they cut away the eye/meat from the bone and then stuff it back on the bone and tie it with twine....
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Old 04-06-2005, 10:32 AM   #9
 
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Vintage 1970's Spring Blossom Corelle dishes!!!!!

I have those! Love them....
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Old 04-06-2005, 10:41 AM   #10
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They were my husband's grandmother's. came with the house. Had them boxed up for a while.
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Old 04-06-2005, 10:55 AM   #11
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Another Idea...

Lodge makes a really neat cast iron hibachi... think it's the model 410 or close to that...

Anyway, my downstairs fireplace draws much better than the others and in a pinch, I move the grate and slip in this hibachi... a few coals, and you can grill some great steaks (or hamburgers, or whatever).

I got mine at Amazon on sale... and shipping was free.. so if anyone is interested, you might check there.
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:19 AM   #12
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Sorry no wisdom here just wanted to say Welcome to the Site Bathrone .
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Old 04-06-2005, 09:48 PM   #13
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Thanks all :)

This all comes from a restuarant that makes delicious steak. Ive since been given the process.

The slow cooking is at 72C (degrees celsuis) for 18 hours. Its not tough at all. Honestly it melts as you cut it with a steak knife.

Im interested to know what slow cooking it would do, and then finishing it off with searing on a hot grill.

It turns out different to steaks I grill alone.
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Old 04-06-2005, 09:52 PM   #14
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Must be cooking the whole side of beef to cook it that long, unless they were cooking a brisket.
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Old 04-06-2005, 10:04 PM   #15
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Possibly they do a whole slab in the oven then cut them as the orders come in.

What I know for certain is the slow cooking process at 72degrees C for 18 hours, dipping in melted butter and searing on a hot grill.

Q: What is the difference between slow cooking and grill cooking? Why would the restuarant goto this effort? What happens with the structure and substance of the meat when slow cooked?

Q: So if I got my own 1inch thick bit of steak I would have to slow cook it at 72c for less time than the 18 hours as it is a much smaller bit of meat?
They do a special with a larger cut of meat, 450g, with bernaise sauce and avocado. Oh yeah, better than ***

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Old 04-06-2005, 10:23 PM   #16
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What type of steak is it? Low & slow is the best way to cook tender a tough piece of meat, such as a brisket.

They are cooking it at slightly above the danger zone.

Normal low & slow cooking temps here are done around 107-121C.

Grilling is cooking hot & fast.

Low & slow is great for tough cuts of meat, for rendering the fat out and making a tough piece of meat moist and tender. Otherwise you would be making jerky.

I would say a 1 inch steak needs to be grilled. It also depends on the cut and grade of the meat.
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:43 PM   #17
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Brisket

This is a brisket (beef) cooked about the way you're talking about... I don't think it took 18 hours but at least 12 I think.

Is this what you're talking about?
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:52 PM   #18
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And I should clarify... I think 72C is about 160 degrees F? And IMHO that's too low to probably be safe.

I know the theoretical danger zone is between 40 and 140 F, but we always slow cook at least 225 F... Anyway, if I can figure out what you're talking about, I might be better able to give you some meaningful information.

We wouldn't call that "steak" here.. it's brisket, the stuff corned beef is usually made of... pretty tough unless it is REALLY slow cooked for a long time.. then it melts in you mouth...
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Old 04-07-2005, 03:02 AM   #19
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No its definatly not corned beef style cuts. It is prime rib steak, juicy and tender.

It is actually cooked on the grill, the slow cooking isnt complete, when its dipped in melted butter its seared on a hot grill.

My freind was saying slow cooking gelatinises the tissue or something?
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Old 04-07-2005, 03:07 AM   #20
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Here is the process:

1. Grain fed prime beef
2. Slow cooked at 72 degrees celsuis for 18hours
3. Dipped in melted butter
4. High temperature seared on a hot grill
5. Served with bernaise sauce and avocado
I can only describe the steak as being moist and tender, with a delicate and delightful taste. It just melts when chewed.
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