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Old 03-09-2008, 10:02 PM   #1
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I seriously cannot grill a steak without destroying it!

I've got a beautiful new outdoor stainless steel kitchen. Beautiful four-burner BBQ, and a separate grill. Can I cook a steak without someone losing a tooth while eating it? Nope.

I am VERY willing to hear techniques, tried-and-trues, any hints at all that will help. I can grill almost ANYTHING else on the BBQ (lemon pizza, fruit, nachos, vegetables, etc).

Lake season is coming, and I'm looking to CONQUER THE STEAK STIGMA!

Please. LOL.

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Old 03-09-2008, 10:04 PM   #2
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You came to the right place. We can help you cook the perfect steak. Why don't you start by telling us, step by step, exactly how you do it now. We will then be able to suggest what you can do to improve your technique.
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Old 03-09-2008, 10:29 PM   #3
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click here: http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...eak-43593.html
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Old 03-09-2008, 11:23 PM   #4
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ginger, gb's right. it'd help if you told us what you actually do.

do you use a temperature probe, poke to feel the firmness, or just try to time it? those are pretty much the three ways you can tell if a steak is done.

more tips: make sure your grill is clean and very hot, and use a clump of paper towels to spread some oil on it just before putting the steak down.

ok, so, tell us whatsa happenin'...
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Old 03-10-2008, 05:27 AM   #5
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Also be sure to let us know what cuts of steak you are cooking.
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Old 03-10-2008, 06:18 AM   #6
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Also be sure to let us know what cuts of steak you are cooking.

......And what Grade. As in USDA Choice or USDA Select...?
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Old 03-10-2008, 08:37 AM   #7
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Get a thermometer and see how hot your grill is.
Then get a timer and time your steaks based on the heat reading.
Start with 3-4 minutes each side, depending on how you like them.

Very soon, you will know how long to cook them on each side.

Might not be as "cool" as poking them to know when they are done,
but they will be edible, LOL!
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Old 03-10-2008, 09:34 AM   #8
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Cooking a steak isn't difficult if you know a couple of things. First, you must know what cuts make good steaks. They are many, but each requires a different method for cooking. For instance, a flank steak produces a wonderful meal but should be cooked to no more than medium rare (very pink inside) and then sliced thin agains the grain and at an angle (on the bias). By cutting against the grain, you take a fairly tough cut of meat and make it more tender. A great bone-in rib steak needs to be cooked between rare and medium rare to allow teh full flavor of the meat to come through. The meat should be well marbled with flecks of fat all over the place, but with few chunks of fat. This insures that the meat will have full flavor and will be juciy and tender. For a chcuk steak, look at the steak. You will recognize three seperte muscles in this cut. The largest of these offers the most tender eating. The chuck is full flavored, but can be tough. The smaller muscles should be cut away and researved for stews and such.

There are a host of beef cut charts available for free on the internet. Simply type in Beef Charts on Google and you will find full color charts of the carcass telling which cuts come from where, and the best ways to cook them.

Also, know that in order of quality, in the U.S. are prime (don't worry, you won't find this at your local supermarket), Choice (the best you can get at your local supermarket), select (the lowest grade you should ever purchase), and down from there. You usually won't find anything less than select grade at your local market. Select is what you purchace when you want to grind your own ground beef. It has larger chunks of fat and less marbling. It is tougher, and less flavorfull than is Choice-grade.

As for technique, many of us have favorite techniques. And there is no "perfect" way to cook a steak. But the favored methods all share some basic principles. These include cooking to the proper degree of doneness, avoid piercing a cooking steak, fiddle with the thing as little as possible, know your equipment. Surprizingly, both gas and charcoal can give excellent results. Often, people who have been given blind taste tests couldn't tell the difference. I prefer a charcoal grill only because I can do things with it that I can't replicate on a gas grill. But cooking steaks isn't one of them.

Tell us what cuts you will be cooking and we can give you a host of techniques that will give you great end results.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-10-2008, 11:54 AM   #9
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Ginger, do what I do. Get someone else to cook them. LOL I cna't grill to save my life.
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Old 03-11-2008, 07:35 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Surprizingly, both gas and charcoal can give excellent results. Often, people who have been given blind taste tests couldn't tell the difference.
FENCE SITTER!!!!!!!
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Old 03-11-2008, 09:45 AM   #11
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I get Prime at my local market. It all depends on your area and of course the market.

I may have to go get a nice Ribeye on the way home tonight!
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Old 03-11-2008, 09:57 AM   #12
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Greetings, everyone!

Wow...thanks for the input! I realize I didn't give my "technique" (if you can call it that..LOL) of grilling the steak....

I will vary between sirloin (my favourite), rib eye, and t-bone. I've dallied with different cuts *hoping* to find that it's my CHOICE of meat that's the issue (not the person who's grilling it!). No luck.

I do bring the meat out about half an hour or so before grilling, and season it. I talked to a chef that makes THE best steaks I've ever had at a steakhouse, and he said to make a "butter rub" and smear it on the steak grill side down. Butter and your choice of herbs. It did taste better...but it's the texture I'm having the biggest problems with.

Have read some wild suggestions online...marinating in coffee. Soya sauce. Buttermilk.

Where does a girl begin? :oD
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Old 03-11-2008, 10:06 AM   #13
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how do you cook your steaks gingerlaurie (rare, med rare, well done, etc)? That is something that will have a big affect on the texture.
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Old 03-11-2008, 10:06 AM   #14
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ginger, try mashing 1/4 tsp of basil and just a pinch of dill in 2 or 3 tbsps of butter with a fork. my fave compound butter.
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:01 AM   #15
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A 1" NY Strip (bone-in) cooked on medium to med-high, 3-4 minutes per side will turn out a medium steak.

Let the steak warm to room temperature before grilling, usually takes 15-20 minutes. Preheat the grill. When you remove the steaks, let them sit covered for a minimum of 5 minutes.
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:31 AM   #16
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I'm growing up gradually, so I no longer like my meat "well done". LOL!

Medium well is where I'm at now...leaning towards medium.

I've remembered to "rest" the meat after grilling so the juices don't flow...buckytom, I've never thought of using dill! Sounds wonderful!

Proper temperature is key, obviously, so Jeekinz, if I'm liking it medium well, how long per side at med-high heat...? I have to admit that I like the "charcoal" edges...I'm one of those odd people that pretty much love oddly burned things...cookies, toast, etc.

As I said, I'm growing. Up. :oD

(Or at least I'm trying to!)
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Old 03-11-2008, 11:50 AM   #17
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Start the steak on high heat, just before you flip it turn down the heat to med to med-high. That will give you the burnt edges. You really can't have that burnt edge on anything but a thicker steak otherwise it will be overcooked.

Oh yea, only flip the steak once. And don't be poking and prodding it while it's cooking. Use tongs.

When you are able to cook to the desired temp, you can play around with grill marks and different fuels and techniques.
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Old 03-11-2008, 12:03 PM   #18
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Remember that the steak will continue to cook while resting.....
Add that to your cooking time calculations.
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Old 03-11-2008, 12:09 PM   #19
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I just thought of something. Since you like the charcoal flavor, why not pick up a small charcoal grill like a Weber Ketle or similar? You can use wood lump charcoal or briquetts in it. Then you'll have the flavor you want without incinerating the steak. I use both gas and charcoal grills. Actually, I like the lighter fluid taste on my hotdogs....don't ask why, I just do.

It really isn't as troublesome as people think, and usually takes the same amount of time as a gas grill to preheat.
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Old 03-11-2008, 12:31 PM   #20
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Quote:
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It really isn't as troublesome as people think, and usually takes the same amount of time as a gas grill to preheat.
I have to disagree. I agree with the rest of your post Jeekinz and think your advice to the OP is good advice, however my gas grill is heated and ready in 5 minutes. I have never seen charcoal grills be ready that fast.
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