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Old 04-30-2017, 06:41 AM   #1
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Wok Hei

I've been talking about using one of my jet cookers for doing stir-fry because our electric stove burners just can't heat the wok high enough. Yesterday I gave it a whirl. After adjusting the flame under the wok, mainly by lowering it to the point that left me with some arm hair, I finally got it right. I was totally surprised by how low the flame needed to be. I'm used to the blast furnace required to bring my crawfish pot to a rolling boil. Glad I had every ingredient at hand and in order of need. The stir-fry process went so fast, it was almost like it didn't happen!

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Old 04-30-2017, 08:42 AM   #2
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I've heard of using a turkey fryer burner for wok cooking but never tried it. I can see how it would speed up my process as now I have to cook each ingredient separately then combine them at the end.

Craig, have you considered leaving the burner on high and just moving the wok on and off as needed?
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Old 04-30-2017, 09:19 AM   #3
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I can relate. Though I don't have the equipment to do it like you do, while in Hong Kong, I purchase some street food from a guy who had basically, a blow torch, and a wok. The wok was clean and well seasoned. The flame was extreme. He put that wok over the flame, added a splash of oil, and started throwing in chunks of chicken, and veggies, seasoned with onion, garlic, soy, and a few things I can no longer remember. He kept the food moving constantly. In less than a minute, it seemed to me, the food was done, seasoned perfectly, and handed to me in a paper container, along with cheap chopsticks. It tasted so amazing. I don't remember if there was a sauce or not. That was back in 1984. But it impressed me enough that I still remember the flavor, and watching the guy work.

So, how do I get to your house again?

On my largest burner on my gas stove, I can almost get my Atlas, flat bottom wok hot enough, but not quite.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-30-2017, 09:47 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I can relate. Though I don't have the equipment to do it like you do, while in Hong Kong, I purchase some street food from a guy who had basically, a blow torch, and a wok. The wok was clean and well seasoned. The flame was extreme. He put that wok over the flame, added a splash of oil, and started throwing in chunks of chicken, and veggies, seasoned with onion, garlic, soy, and a few things I can no longer remember. He kept the food moving constantly. In less than a minute, it seemed to me, the food was done, seasoned perfectly, and handed to me in a paper container, along with cheap chopsticks. It tasted so amazing. I don't remember if there was a sauce or not. That was back in 1984. But it impressed me enough that I still remember the flavor, and watching the guy work.

So, how do I get to your house again?

On my largest burner on my gas stove, I can almost get my Atlas, flat bottom wok hot enough, but not quite.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I will never go back to doing stir-fry on the stove again. I have an open air, screen porch. That will become my stir-fry "kitchen".

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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I've heard of using a turkey fryer burner for wok cooking but never tried it. I can see how it would speed up my process as now I have to cook each ingredient separately then combine them at the end.

Craig, have you considered leaving the burner on high and just moving the wok on and off as needed?
I started out at about half way to full open on the valve after the regulator. Thus my reference to arm hair. If I try that, I'll have to use a welding glove on one arm. Maybe I can get a ring to direct the flame and then shield the rest of the exposed burner.
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Old 04-30-2017, 10:07 AM   #5
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I've heard of using a turkey fryer burner for wok cooking but never tried it. I can see how it would speed up my process as now I have to cook each ingredient separately then combine them at the end.
My process is a little simpler. Brown the meat in peanut oil with a clove of crushed garlic and a couple slices of ginger, then remove to a bowl. Add onion, cook a minute or so, add remaining vegetables, cook a few minutes, scraping up the fond, push them to the sides. Add sauce to the center, stir till it thickens a little, add meat and juices, mix all together. Cook a few minutes to finish the meat, taste, adjust seasoning, and serve.
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Old 04-30-2017, 11:44 AM   #6
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My process is a little simpler. Brown the meat in peanut oil with a clove of crushed garlic and a couple slices of ginger, then remove to a bowl. Add onion, cook a minute or so, add remaining vegetables, cook a few minutes, scraping up the fond, push them to the sides. Add sauce to the center, stir till it thickens a little, add meat and juices, mix all together. Cook a few minutes to finish the meat, taste, adjust seasoning, and serve.
Your burner may be more powerful than mine. If I add too much the heat drops and you can't get the desired effect.
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Old 05-04-2017, 10:53 PM   #7
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I will never go back to doing stir-fry on the stove again.
Stove top fire rings don't help much either. It's still heat at the bottom, but not much further up. I like how Panda Express woks fit into a holder, totally shot with flames.
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