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Old 07-21-2014, 05:14 AM   #1
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Kringles (Scandinavian pretzels)

Made a mistake while posting this, so reposting!
So a while ago I made these kringles (or kringlor in swedish) and after googling it, wikipedia says it's a pastry so I'll post it here! I'm not really sure
Directly translated, these are "pretzels" but I'm sure the pretzels you get in the US don't look like this haha. These are pretty soft, sweet and easy to make. So what would you call this? Kringles or maybe soft pretzels?



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Old 07-21-2014, 07:25 AM   #2
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Beautiful pictures. I think they look like pretzels. They look like pretzels, shaped like pretzels, therefor they are pretzels. If you make a loaf of white bread, and then make a loaf of rye bread, it is still bread.

And since you made them, you can give them any name you want. Like we say here, it is your kitchen, call them what you want. Did you post the recipe in that part of the site?
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Old 07-21-2014, 12:00 PM   #3
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Beautiful pictures. I think they look like pretzels. They look like pretzels, shaped like pretzels, therefor they are pretzels. If you make a loaf of white bread, and then make a loaf of rye bread, it is still bread.....
Thank you for your comments! I guess they're pretzels then And the recipe wasn't mine, so unfortunately had to remove it.
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Old 07-21-2014, 12:40 PM   #4
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I may be mistaken, but I believe "pretzels", in English, are savoury, not sweet.
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Old 07-21-2014, 01:40 PM   #5
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After some time with Google, I believe these are more like shortbread cookies. Most of the kringle recipes I found were more like danishes but a few were for cookie style. I hadn't heard them called kringles before. I like the name though.
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Old 07-21-2014, 03:50 PM   #6
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I may be mistaken, but I believe "pretzels", in English, are savoury, not sweet.
That's my understanding as well.
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:08 PM   #7
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I may be mistaken, but I believe "pretzels", in English, are savoury, not sweet.
I agree with you. But the title says they are Scandinavian pretzels. Not English. And in one of the pictures it shows a page of the cookbook that has the recipe. The title of the pretzel is in Swedish. So if the Swedish people want to call this recipe pretzels, I am not one to argue with them.

Their meatballs have ingredients that an Italian would never put in their meatballs. But they are still meatballs. And very good I might add. I love them.
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:20 PM   #8
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But, in Swedish the things we call pretzels in English are, I believe, usually called "saltkringlor".
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:23 PM   #9
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But, in Swedish the things we call pretzels are, I believe, usually called "saltkringlor".
Could it be the shape that makes them pretzels? I know, I am being picky and sticking up for the poster of them. But she is a new member and I would hate to have her get discouraged with having her first post shot down.
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:37 PM   #10
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I'm not trying to shoot down the OP. I thought I was trying to shoot down what I consider a confusing translation. It's a difficult translation, because most places that speak English don't make these wonderful pastries. I would probably call them "sweet pretzels" in English. I wouldn't want to confuse the person with whom I was speaking.
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Old 07-21-2014, 04:59 PM   #11
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I had no problem calling them Kringles. Where I grew up, that is what they were called in English, not "pretzels." Pretzels are made with yeast dough, kringles (or kringle cookies) are made with butter, sugar,sour milk/buttermilk, flour, almond. Bakeries would sell them around Christmas time and they inevitably showed up a bake sales at that time of year, alongside the Krumkake, etc. Sometimes they were sprinkled with the pearl sugar, other times almonds, other times dipped in chocolate or just dusted with powdered sugar. Sometimes they were "pretzel" like, other times they were figure "8s" (my grandma just made hers as either "Ss" or sticks, still called them Kringle cookies.) However, if one believes Wikipedia, kringle is a perfectly acceptable term whether they are savory, sweet, or filled.

Kringle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There is also a tart-like dessert called Kringle that is not a cookie.
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Old 07-21-2014, 07:38 PM   #12
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They look sweet, delicate, and yummy! Thank you for sharing your pictures.

I have questions: Are the little, snowy-white dots on them made of sugar? Did you roll the pieces into ropes before making the pretzels or do you use some kind of "press" that creates a rope?

I'd likely call them "kringles" if that was what the recipe called them. To me, pretzels are salty, but they can be hard or soft. They are not sweet or delicate, but I would still consider pretzels "yummy."
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Old 07-21-2014, 08:27 PM   #13
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They look sweet, delicate, and yummy! Thank you for sharing your pictures.

I have questions: Are the little, snowy-white dots on them made of sugar? Did you roll the pieces into ropes before making the pretzels or do you use some kind of "press" that creates a rope?

I'd likely call them "kringles" if that was what the recipe called them. To me, pretzels are salty, but they can be hard or soft. They are not sweet or delicate, but I would still consider pretzels "yummy."
Kathleen, I think that is Swedish pearl sugar. I think IKEA carries it in NA or you can order it on-line. The brand I usually buy is the one available from Amazon.

Amazon.com : Lars' Own Swedish Pearl Sugar - 4 pkgs : Coarse Sugar : Grocery & Gourmet Food
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:18 PM   #14
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Thanks! Is it flaked or is it more like sprinkles?
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:42 PM   #15
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Thanks! Is it flaked or is it more like sprinkles?
Like little football shaped sprinkles. I use big fat crystals of sugar that I found in an Indian store.
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:54 PM   #16
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I only know it as pearl sugar, but it is also called nib sugar.

Nib sugar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You can make your own:

DIY Pearl Sugar | The Pancake Princess
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:09 AM   #17
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Thank you all for your comments! Again, any name works for me, as long as you understand what it is
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Kringles (Scandinavian pretzels) Made a mistake while posting this, so reposting! So a while ago I made these kringles (or kringlor in swedish) and after googling it, wikipedia says it's a pastry so I'll post it here! I'm not really sure :wacko: Directly translated, these are "pretzels" but I'm sure the pretzels you get in the US don't look like this haha. These are pretty soft, sweet and easy to make. So what would you call this? Kringles or maybe soft pretzels? [IMG]https://sourdoughsweetgirl.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/21.png[/IMG] [IMG]https://sourdoughsweetgirl.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/41.png[/IMG] [IMG]https://sourdoughsweetgirl.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/31.png[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
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