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Old 05-24-2020, 04:16 PM   #41
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I thought it might be over blending also.
I don't let the ice sit around softening, I toss the carton in the microwave and give 18-20 seconds while I lay out the other supplies. I've also discovered (due to old wrists) that the sharpness of the ice cream scoop is important in "scoopability" of firmish ice cream. I have some scoops that I wouldn't be able to get a scoop out of the carton if the ice cream is near liquid. But another, is sharp enough to cut through some pretty solid stuff. I might have to give a booze milkshake a try.
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Old 05-24-2020, 05:38 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Oldvine View Post
I thought it might be over blending also.
I don't let the ice sit around softening, I toss the carton in the microwave and give 18-20 seconds while I lay out the other supplies. I've also discovered (due to old wrists) that the sharpness of the ice cream scoop is important in "scoopability" of firmish ice cream. I have some scoops that I wouldn't be able to get a scoop out of the carton if the ice cream is near liquid. But another, is sharp enough to cut through some pretty solid stuff. I might have to give a booze milkshake a try.
I have an ice cream scoop with antifreeze sealed in the handle. After your hand warms it up, it flows into the scoop and slightly melts the ice cream, making it easy to scoop. No idea where I got it - I've had it for years.
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Old 05-24-2020, 09:09 PM   #43
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GG, both Loverly and I have scoops like that. She has my Mom's old one, so I have no idea where Mom got it. I was just a kid then, so it's well over a half-century old. Still working, and better than I do most days.


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Oh well I guess that makes sense, but is there a way to mathematically calculate a recipe for air filled ice cream instead then?
All ice cream has an "ingredient" in it that is not listed in the ingredients list. It's overrun, AKA "air", that is beaten into the cream/milk/(egg)/sugar, etc custard base that gives ice cream it's soft, creamy texture. Your average ice cream has 100% overrun. If you're holding a pint container in your hand, it has one cup base and one cup air. If you're using this type of ice cream, you're using too soft of a product. No matter how much you use, when you blend it with the rest of the milk shake ingredients it will become too thin. A premium ice cream has more custard base-to-air, so you have a thicker, richer ice cream when you begin.

The One Ice Cream Metric That Matters to Grocers

No ice cream company will tell you how much air is in their product. How to find good ice cream? Look for high butterfat content. The more butterfat, the less air. Again, these will be the better quality ice creams: eg: Ben & Jerry's, Haagen-Dazs.

Ice Cream Geek: Butterfat and Cream

Buy a pint of your local area's best (well, at least very good) ice cream and start from there. I'm tired and the brain can't "math" anymore, but I'm going to guess that the 500 grams of ice cream in that second recipe is just about a pint of ice cream. If you don't follow the author's suggestion to letting scooped ice cream soften in the fridge for 1/2 hour and instead work with a barely-softened ice cream*, you might have better luck.

Good luck. Let us know how things are going.

*Remember, the firmer the ice cream you start with, the better chance you have for a thicker milk shake.
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Old 05-24-2020, 10:42 PM   #44
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I wouldn't use ice cream, I would use sherbet! But that's just me!
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Old 06-01-2020, 04:04 PM   #45
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If you ask me what is sold under the name Milk shake is in fact ice cream shake. Since I do not like ice cream I make my Milk shake the way I like it. 1, only one scoop of ice cream, lots of milk, raspberry or strawberry syrup, maybe 1 or 2 ice cubes.
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Old 10-22-2020, 06:42 AM   #46
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Can you explain to me the difference between sherbet and sorbet?
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Old 10-22-2020, 07:40 AM   #47
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Can you explain to me the difference between sherbet and sorbet?
Sherbet has cream.
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Old 10-22-2020, 09:27 AM   #48
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Can you explain to me the difference between sherbet and sorbet?
sherbert has a milk product of some sort, milk, cream, yogurt etc. there is some limits as to how much cream, etc that is added before it then becomes Ice Cream.

sorbet is typically made with fruit/juice and sugar and water. no milk products
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Old 10-26-2020, 10:05 AM   #49
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Can you explain to me the difference between sherbet and sorbet? I found only this review https://differencebtwn.com/differenc...rbet-vs-sorbet
Thanks. Very useful info.
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