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Old 10-17-2018, 07:11 PM   #1
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Help with prime rib please

I had a great recipe for prime rib, it was on a web site with recipes for Wisconsin classics. Did I ever print it in case the web site went away? Of course not. Maybe someone here can help.
The recipe involved very little seasoning...salt, pepper and rosemary. The cooking involved one temp in the oven, then shutting the heat off for an hour. Then heat back on for about an hour, always came out perfectly medium rare.
Any ideas? Thank you very much.
Also, just got my first Allclad pan, a 4 quart saute pan. Can't believe I waited 40 years to buy one.

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Old 10-17-2018, 07:21 PM   #2
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I've never heard of that recipe..but there is the no peek recipe..it involves cooking on high for a few minutes per pound then shutting your oven off and leaving it in there with the door closed for a few hours....
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:34 PM   #3
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There's more than one way to 'skin a cat'. I have used Rocklobster's method many times with success but now I use the reverse sear method and don't plan to change back.

P.S. this is exactly why I always copy a recipe onto my computer as soon as I decide I want one.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:42 PM   #4
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Care to spill the details Andy? Thx.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:57 PM   #5
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Here's the "No Peak" method:

STANDING RIB ROAST



1 Ea Standing Rib Roast
TT Salt and Black Pepper
1/4 C Flour


Preheat the oven to 500 F.

Just before putting the roast into the oven, rub it with salt, pepper, and flour.

The timing of the cooking is based upon the number of ribs and the degree of doneness you want. Multiply the number of ribs by 12 minutes for rare, 13 minutes for medium rare, and 14 for medium. For example, if you have a 4 rib roast and want it to be medium rare, you would calculate 4x13=52 minutes.

Place the roast into the 500 F oven and cook it for the prescribed time.

DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ONCE YOU PUT IN THE ROAST.

After the calculated cooking time, shut off the oven and DON'T OPEN THE OVEN DOOR.

Leave the roast in the oven for at least and hour and a half (and up to three hours. There will be no change in the degree of doneness). DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR DURING THIS TIME.

After the 90-180 minutes, remove the roast and cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving.
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Old 10-17-2018, 07:59 PM   #6
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Here's the "Reverse Sear" method:

ROAST BEEF (REVERSE SEAR METHOD)





This recipe uses a rib eye roast. The process will work with other beef roasts.


1 Ea Rib Roast, 6-7Lbs
2 Tb Kosher Salt
TT Black Pepper


Trim excess fat from the roast leaving a " of fat. Using a sharp knife cut a crosshatch pattern through the fat at 1" intervals.

Rub the salt all over the roast surface. Place the roast on a plate or pan and put it in the refrigerator uncovered for at least 24 hours.

When ready to cook, remove the roast from the refrigerator an allow it to rest at room temperature for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 225F.

Place the roast on a pan with a rack. Insert a thermometer so the tip of the probe is in the center of the main muscle and place it in the oven.

Roast to an internal temperature of 120F for rare/125F for medium rare. Remove the roast when it reaches temperature and tent it with foil. Let it rest for an hour or more.

Bring the oven temperature to 450F and put the roast back in the oven for 5-10 minutes. Remove and carve.

Elapsed Time:
5 Lb roast – 3 hours 45 minutes roasting, resting, searing.
7 Lb roast - 4 hours

NOTE: The internal temps I listed above are on the low side. Some would call 125 rare.
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Old 10-17-2018, 08:37 PM   #7
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CraigC has a great recipe that a restaurateur told him about. Hopefully he will post it later. It's 500 for so many minutes, then s really low temp for so many pounds, but I can never remember exact numbers.
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Old 10-17-2018, 11:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
There's more than one way to 'skin a cat'.
Remind me to skip the prime rib at Andy's house next time...
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Old 10-18-2018, 05:02 AM   #9
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Pre-heat oven to 500F. Season roast as you wish. Place in oven and cook at 500F for 5 minutes. Reduce oven temp to 200F and cook for 1 hour per pound, for rare.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:58 AM   #10
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Paula Deen has that recipe on her site. I have used it in the past on several occasions and it comes out perfect. Both my daughter and her husband ask for it for their birthday feast. Glad to do it, as long as they pay for it. I usually only make a three rib roast for each of them.

Take a look. And this time remember to save it or print it out for future use.
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:36 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Here's the "Reverse Sear" method:

ROAST BEEF (REVERSE SEAR METHOD)





This recipe uses a rib eye roast. The process will work with other beef roasts.


1 Ea Rib Roast, 6-7Lbs
2 Tb Kosher Salt
TT Black Pepper


Trim excess fat from the roast leaving a " of fat. Using a sharp knife cut a crosshatch pattern through the fat at 1" intervals.

Rub the salt all over the roast surface. Place the roast on a plate or pan and put it in the refrigerator uncovered for at least 24 hours.

When ready to cook, remove the roast from the refrigerator an allow it to rest at room temperature for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 225F.

Place the roast on a pan with a rack. Insert a thermometer so the tip of the probe is in the center of the main muscle and place it in the oven.

Roast to an internal temperature of 120F for rare/125F for medium rare. Remove the roast when it reaches temperature and tent it with foil. Let it rest for an hour or more.

Bring the oven temperature to 450F and put the roast back in the oven for 5-10 minutes. Remove and carve.

Elapsed Time:
5 Lb roast 3 hours 45 minutes roasting, resting, searing.
7 Lb roast - 4 hours

NOTE: The internal temps I listed above are on the low side. Some would call 125 rare.

Why do you let it rest between the low cook and the sear? And how is 5 -10 minutes enough
"Asking for a friend" who has to cook the christmas prime rib this year
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:41 AM   #12
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5-10 minutes is enough to finish the crust. It seems to work. The crust has already started to form during the slow cook.

Resting before means you don't have to rest after and minimizes added cooking of the interior during the sear.

I've used this method several times on boneless prime ribs and it works to perfection. Worth a try.
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:43 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
5-10 minutes is enough to finish the crust. It seems to work. The crust has already started to form during the slow cook.

Resting before means you don't have to rest after and minimizes added cooking of the interior during the sear.

I've used this method several times on boneless prime ribs and it works to perfection. Worth a try.

Thanks, my friend
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:45 AM   #14
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Thanks, my friend
You're welcome.

Another benefit of doing it this way is the flexibility for timing dinner. When all the rest of the food is just about ready, sear the roast, carve and serve.
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Old 10-18-2018, 01:44 PM   #15
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I might try the reverse sear on the Egg this year. We were really pleased the way that rib-eye turned out. Jennyema, you should give the reverse sear method a try on your Egg!
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Old 10-18-2018, 01:55 PM   #16
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You're welcome.

Another benefit of doing it this way is the flexibility for timing dinner. When all the rest of the food is just about ready, sear the roast, carve and serve.
+1. A few years ago, when I was really sick, I had to delay Christmas dinner for at least an hour. I had already started the roast and it was close to temperature when I had to lie down for a while. I finished it and it was perfect. Luckily it was just DH and me for dinner
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:41 AM   #17
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So many solutions for the "perfect prime rib" when KISS always works.

This is NOT rocket science here, it never was, to our fathers and grandfathers and mothers and grandmothers who did this cut of beef a THOUSAND times over.


However, in the NOW, your roasting pan SUCKS!

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/...uicy-meat.html

This also goes for prime rib but, forget about the "baking stone."
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Old 12-07-2018, 05:28 AM   #18
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There are some of us that prefer the flavor of prime rib cooked over charcoal and fruit/nut wood, meat in general for that matter. Also the crust that a reverse sear method provides.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:25 AM   #19
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Yep, preferences and methods!

IMHO, to me though, "reverse sear' is like pitching your tent AFTER the rain has come down.

Yeah, go low for the interior and THEN sizzle that suckers exterior at the end.

One problem though- when you sear at the END of the roasting cycle, you're just heating up the INTERIOR that much more because it had been heating up slowly, but now, it is influenced by the outside reverse sear temperature, which means the interior temperature of the roast will go up several degrees than you had originally intended.


Long story short: Your medium rare will turn into medium well, because of "reverse sear".

Pitch that tent BEFORE it rains....
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:33 AM   #20
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The people who are suggesting reverse sear in this thread have tried it. They know exactly how it turns out.
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