"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Beef
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-14-2019, 09:27 AM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
People are so cynical these days.
And most often with good reason.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2019, 10:05 AM   #22
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,591
Obviously taste is a personal preference and I will never going to argue with anybody about taste.

But few years ago I was introduced to free range, pasture grass fed beef. I found the taste so much more pleasant, so much more flavorful compared to corn fed cows. Absolutely no comparing. I now only search for grass fed meat. To the point that I try to avoid meat produced from corn fed animals. Same goes with chicken.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2019, 10:53 AM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Obviously taste is a personal preference and I will never going to argue with anybody about taste.

But few years ago I was introduced to free range, pasture grass fed beef. I found the taste so much more pleasant, so much more flavorful compared to corn fed cows. Absolutely no comparing. I now only search for grass fed meat. To the point that I try to avoid meat produced from corn fed animals. Same goes with chicken.
I did the same thing several years ago and had the opposite experience. The grass-fed beef didn't seem to have much flavor. Grade, aging and proper cooking seem to affect flavor much more, imo.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2019, 11:14 AM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
One day I was watching a piece regarding how our food is made. I already knew that corn was not on the menu for cattle. They are grazers. When they are rounded up off the range and loaded to be shipped to the feed lots. Corn IS NOT a natural food for them. They only are fed it to fatten them up quickly and then shipped off to slaughter.

For the first or couple of days they spend in the feed lots, they refuse to eat. It is only when they become starving, will they wander over to the troughs that have the kernels of corn in them.

And BTW, there is a world of difference between the corn that is sold to the public for eating and what is grown and fed to cattle for fattening. Even humans wouldn't eat what they are given.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 12:50 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
One day I was watching a piece regarding how our food is made. I already knew that corn was not on the menu for cattle. They are grazers. When they are rounded up off the range and loaded to be shipped to the feed lots. Corn IS NOT a natural food for them. They only are fed it to fatten them up quickly and then shipped off to slaughter.

For the first or couple of days they spend in the feed lots, they refuse to eat. It is only when they become starving, will they wander over to the troughs that have the kernels of corn in them.
It's been bugging me that this misinformation has been sitting here unanswered, sooo...

There are a lot of "documentaries" out there these days that are just propaganda and are are as unreliable as some nutrition sites. Be careful what you believe.

It's not true at all that cattle won't eat corn unless they're starving, nor is true that they get only corn in a feedlot, nor is it true that they get corn kernels. Producing cattle feed is a precise science. People seem to think that corn-fed cattle are raised for their entire lives on corn, but that's not the case.

https://beefrunner.com/2012/09/27/as...n-harm-cattle/

Quote:
And BTW, there is a world of difference between the corn that is sold to the public for eating and what is grown and fed to cattle for fattening. Even humans wouldn't eat what they are given.
Of course there is a difference. Their digestive systems, including four stomachs, process grass and other forage differently from ours - they very efficiently turn carbs into protein. So they're putting on weight in a feedlot, but it's not fat.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 02:00 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 2,021
Red face Not to be argumentative, but ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
...
And BTW, there is a world of difference between the corn that is sold to the public for eating and what is grown and fed to cattle for fattening. Even humans wouldn't eat what they are given.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic
Of course there is a difference. Their digestive systems, including four stomachs, process grass and other forage differently from ours - they very efficiently turn carbs into protein. So they're putting on weight in a feedlot, but it's not fat.
Livestock is fed dent corn, also known as field corn, and there is a big difference between dent corn and sweet corn.
Corn on the cob from the produce department, canned corn, and frozen corn is all sweet corn too.
But Americans eat a lot of dent corn. Cornbread, corn chips, and corn syrup, high fructose or not, are all made of dent corn.

There is another kind called Indian corn or flint corn. I only see it in the big chain grocery stores in the fall sold dried on the cob mainly for decoration. White, yellow, red, and blue flint corn kernels are often sold in bulk in ethnic Mexican grocery stores though. That's the kind of corn that hominy is made from as well as the traditional masa from which corn tortillas are made. I'm not sure whether dent or flint corn is actually used in mass-produced corn tortillas most common in grocery stores.

Anyway, not to be argumentative, but I'd guess that Americans who do most of their shopping in those center aisles of the grocery store and generally prefer processed foods to vegetables are probably eating more dent/field corn than sweet corn.
__________________
Food fuels the body. Good food fuels body and soul.

"Recipes don’t have to be followed EXACTLY and creative diversions can taste great! But too much diversion and you have ice cream in your broccoli." Mike Israetel
skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 08:51 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,642
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I believe you're right. When we were in Ireland in 200ě, the pork was much more fatty and tasted very good. Funny thing was that we saw flocks of sheep roaming everywhere, but I never saw any pigs
In the North of England, and in Scotland, sheep seem to be everywhere. Yet, in all the times I've been there, I don't recall eating any lamb. I did buy an absolutely wonderful soft cashmere sweater in Scotland.

The UK has always seemed rather pork-centric, from my personal experience. I've never been there for more than couple of weeks at a time, so I don't know what they eat on a daily basis.

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 09:05 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,642
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I did the same thing several years ago and had the opposite experience. The grass-fed beef didn't seem to have much flavor. Grade, aging and proper cooking seem to affect flavor much more, imo.
In several polls, Americans preferred corn finished beef to grass finished. I prefer grass finished beef, and a lot of that has to do with the fact that I have been to a couple of Texas feed lots. The animals live in mud and feces, and eat corn, which cattle were not designed to eat.

Keep in mind, all cattle start out grass fed. They get sent to feed lots to eat corn and gain weight when they are close to slaughter age. So, "grass fed" doesn't mean that all the cattle ate was grass, unless the rancher specifically says so. Nolan Ryan says, point blank, "Cattle raised exclusively on a grass diet, never receiving any grain."

I love a good steak. But, I also want to know that the animal who died for my dinner had a decent, humane life.

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 09:22 PM   #29
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,642
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
It's been bugging me that this misinformation has been sitting here unanswered, sooo...

There are a lot of "documentaries" out there these days that are just propaganda and are are as unreliable as some nutrition sites. Be careful what you believe.

It's not true at all that cattle won't eat corn unless they're starving, nor is true that they get only corn in a feedlot, nor is it true that they get corn kernels. Producing cattle feed is a precise science. People seem to think that corn-fed cattle are raised for their entire lives on corn, but that's not the case.

https://beefrunner.com/2012/09/27/as...n-harm-cattle/



Of course there is a difference. Their digestive systems, including four stomachs, process grass and other forage differently from ours - they very efficiently turn carbs into protein. So they're putting on weight in a feedlot, but it's not fat.
Well, once again, in your compulsion to correct Addie, you got it all wrong.

Cattle feedlots are horrible places. You can post links to websites that support your arguments, but I've actually been to some. Real life experience. The cattle are living in mud and feces. They get pumped full of antibiotics just to keep them alive long enough to gain weight, so the owners can get more money from them. And yes, it is almost all fat!

I wish I could take you to one. The stench is overwhelming. Imagine an outhouse in July, that has never been cleaned. Then, double that.

The cattle eat corn, which they were not meant to eat, because that is what is available to them. Again, it is all about fattening them up.

We have a lot of corporate chicken farms here in NE Texas, too. I can't describe the smell from those. Imagine an outhouse full of s--t and ammonia. Double that. You can drive past one by 500 yards, and have to roll up the car windows.

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 10:37 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Thank you CD. When I was living in Texas, my daughter was dating a boy whose family owned a large cattle range in the middle of Texas. I was fortunate enough that they invited me there a number of times and it was definitely an eye opener regarding how we get our food. I think the most difficult activity was during branding time. But I got over it quickly. The cattle would let out a howl get it's ear either clipped or tagged and a few other activities done and be on his way.

I was always full of questions. Regarding branding; "Why. There isn't any more cattle rustling?" Oh how wrong that statement was. Then I was invited there when it came roundup time. Followed the cattle to the feed lots. I experienced the same as you. Now due to surgery as a newborn infant, my sense of smell is almost nonexistent. But I could smell that feed lot. The workers were also loading up a herd for slaughter. When those stalls were empty, the troughs were filled with the corn, and then my hosts trucks were emptied without even cleaning up the ground of the feces from the last herd. I was horrified, but kept my mouth shut. What did I know. I was just a Yankee from up north.

Even with the western style hankerchief that my host gave me to place over my nose, it was exactly as you described.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 10:46 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,745
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
In several polls, Americans preferred corn finished beef to grass finished. I prefer grass finished beef, and a lot of that has to do with the fact that I have been to a couple of Texas feed lots. The animals live in mud and feces, and eat corn, which cattle were not designed to eat.

Keep in mind, all cattle start out grass fed. They get sent to feed lots to eat corn and gain weight when they are close to slaughter age. So, "grass fed" doesn't mean that all the cattle ate was grass, unless the rancher specifically says so. Nolan Ryan says, point blank, "Cattle raised exclusively on a grass diet, never receiving any grain."

I love a good steak. But, I also want to know that the animal who died for my dinner had a decent, humane life.

CD
Yes, this.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2019, 09:02 AM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
Well, once again, in your compulsion to correct Addie, you got it all wrong.

Cattle feedlots are horrible places. You can post links to websites that support your arguments, but I've actually been to some. Real life experience. The cattle are living in mud and feces. They get pumped full of antibiotics just to keep them alive long enough to gain weight, so the owners can get more money from them. And yes, it is almost all fat!

I wish I could take you to one. The stench is overwhelming. Imagine an outhouse in July, that has never been cleaned. Then, double that.

The cattle eat corn, which they were not meant to eat, because that is what is available to them. Again, it is all about fattening them up.

We have a lot of corporate chicken farms here in NE Texas, too. I can't describe the smell from those. Imagine an outhouse full of s--t and ammonia. Double that. You can drive past one by 500 yards, and have to roll up the car windows.

CD
"You're wrong!" "No, you're wrong!"

I have no doubt that some feedlots are better run than others, but anecdotes do not equal data. From my reading, most feedlots are responsibly run by relatively small farms with owners who care about their animals. You go on believing what you want. The bottom line is that cows are not fed just corn kernels. And remember that corn is a plant, not just the cob. We don't eat the rest of the plant - stalks, leaves, husks - because it's a grass and doesn't have a lot of nutrition for us. But it's great for cattle.

Cattle feed has a lot more ingredients than just corn. It's big business and ranchers have dieticians and veterinarians available for advice. If you're interested, you can look it up yourself since you don't like my sources.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.