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Old 08-22-2005, 11:29 AM   #1
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What is a Scotch Fillet Steak?

Is there another name for that cut? I have found many recipes that call for scotch fillet steaks, but I do not recognize the cut they are referring to.

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Old 08-22-2005, 12:33 PM   #2
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Maybe this will help. Scotch, I think is the breed or breeder, and fillet may be the tenderloin.


http://www.qbutcher.com/beef.htm
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Old 08-22-2005, 01:04 PM   #3
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Scotch beef is the trade mark of Scottish-reared and usually scottish butchered beef. We still use the word 'Scotch' for foodstuffs, eg Butterscotch, Scotch eggs - just don't call the natives that, we prefer Scots or Scottish!

Here's some further info.
http://www.qmscotland.co.uk/marketing/
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Old 08-22-2005, 01:23 PM   #4
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So then would one say:

"My friend Ishbel is the Scot who always provides interesting Scottish recipes for us"

or

"My friend Ishbel is Scots/Scottish, and always provides interesting Scottish recipes for us"
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Old 08-22-2005, 01:31 PM   #5
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Scotch Fillet (Not to be confused with Scotch Whiskey)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine
Maybe this will help. Scotch, I think is the breed or breeder, and fillet may be the tenderloin.


http://www.qbutcher.com/beef.htm
While looking for a clue to what cut of beef they were referring to, I noticed that a photo of a prepared dish looked like they used a Flank Steak Fillet. It was a thin fillet with a large surface area. I suppose I could substitute whatever seems to go best with the recipe.

Thanks for your responses.
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Old 08-22-2005, 04:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
So then would one say:

"My friend Ishbel is the Scot who always provides interesting Scottish recipes for us"

or

"My friend Ishbel is Scots/Scottish, and always provides interesting Scottish recipes for us"


Mudbug: Oh, aren't you NICE!!!!

Fillet is the filet - as butchery in Scotland uses many of the French cuts (as opposed to English-style butchery) I don't know how better to describe it!) Try this British site which has photographs of some of the cuts.

http://www.lordsofmiddleton.co.uk/cg...ER_ID=!ORDERID!
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Old 08-22-2005, 04:58 PM   #7
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Looking at my Larousse Gastronomique, which details the three ways that the England/France/US butcher their beef it seems no one uses scotch fillet.

It may be an Australian term since it is quite common here. According to an online butcher here it is alternatively known as rib eye fillet (note: not on the bone as rib eye steak is). It does not refer to beef sourced from Scotland :P.

Anyway take a look at this site: http://www.samthebutcher.com.au/products.htm

Hope it helps.
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Old 08-22-2005, 05:09 PM   #8
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I only buy Scotch beef (even though British beef is readily available via local supermarkets) from my local organic butcher.

The eye of the fillet is what we normally call filet steak.

Mind you, Haggis, I can't legislate for what Aussies name their meat..... but perhaps if they are referring to it as Scotch, the Scottish parliament should claim a tax?
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Old 08-22-2005, 06:46 PM   #9
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Heh, the French sure do it enough!

Supposedly even 'port' will be protected, in our case we will probably have to call them 'Fortified Australian Dry Red Wine'.
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Old 08-23-2005, 02:32 AM   #10
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I know that 'Scotch' beef has got a special status in the EU nowadays, ie only beef from specific areas and herds can use the appellation 'Scotch' - a bit like Champagne or Burgundy or Roquefort or Brie...!
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Old 08-24-2005, 04:38 AM   #11
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Scotch fillet is the steak used in fillet mignon (sp) - also called eye fillet or fillet or from larger cut which is a tenderloin - which is then cut into the scotch fillet.
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Old 08-24-2005, 07:58 AM   #12
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Thanks for the clarification - I thought it was the 'eye' of the fillet!
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Old 08-24-2005, 10:20 AM   #13
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Haggis, if I see a bottle of "Sydney Harbour fortified" I shall know it be a fine Austalian Port.
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Old 08-24-2005, 12:25 PM   #14
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Grooooooooooaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnn, Robo. But funny!
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Old 08-24-2005, 02:14 PM   #15
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Scotch fillet is an economy cut primarily used for roasting or braising from the chuck section.....never heard of it coming from fillet.
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Old 08-24-2005, 03:03 PM   #16
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Scotch Fillet

http://www.nzbeeflamb.co.nz/download...e_BeefCuts.pdf

According to this picture and explanation, it is not a braising cut and is also called a rib eye fillet. Fillet means thin cut.

Nosing around on google and egullet has me convinced that it is a name of a cut of beef and has nothing to do with Scotland being the origin of the beef.

At least today.

Popular in Australia.
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Old 08-24-2005, 04:27 PM   #17
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Seems different depending on the continent we live on.No such thing in Scotland.

In NZ your grilling Scotch Fillet and in Can. I'm grilling
ribeye's.......no worries.
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Old 09-13-2005, 10:00 AM   #18
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Thumbs up The Final Word On Scotch Fillet

Here's what I was looking for:

Australian Term: Scotch Fillet

U.S.A. Term: Ribeye Fillet (Ribeye steak without bone)

Thank you Haggis and Foodaholic for distilling the answer I was looking for. Everyone else, thanks for your input!

The problem with searching an Aussie website for recipes (if you live in Texas) is that you need to translate the terms used in some cases.
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Old 02-14-2010, 09:43 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chazad3 View Post
Is there another name for that cut? I have found many recipes that call for scotch fillet steaks, but I do not recognize the cut they are referring to.
In New Zealand It is another name for rib eye fillet. Good steak!!!!
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