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Old 08-03-2016, 04:08 PM   #1
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Question Best Way to Cook Pork Loin Boneless Chops?

They are about 3/4" thick.

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Old 08-03-2016, 04:15 PM   #2
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There are lots of ways; there is no single best way. Do you want to cook them whole, or in pieces, like kebabs? Grilled, broiled, pan-fried, stir-fried, baked? Chinese, Mexican, Greek, Italian, Thai?

Give us an idea of your preferences and other ingredients you have and we can help you better.
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Old 08-03-2016, 04:19 PM   #3
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That's a very lean cut of pork and would benefit greatly from a quick brine. 30-60 minutes should be enough.

Then you can pan fry or grill them to an internal temperature of 145ºF.
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Old 08-03-2016, 05:10 PM   #4
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Yes, I agree, the most important thing to do first is brine them, 4 cups of water with 1/4 cup Kosher salt.
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Old 08-03-2016, 07:21 PM   #5
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Me too on the brine, though I usually add some garlic, a little bit of something sweet like brown sugar, molasses or maple syrup, and beer or apple cider, hard or not, for part of the liquid.
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Old 08-03-2016, 08:14 PM   #6
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I hope these chops weren't for tonight's dinner.
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Old 08-04-2016, 12:41 AM   #7
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I've said it before, and I'll say it again, I brine all pork chops before they are wrapped for the freezer. It makes life simple...well maybe not, but the idea is there.
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Old 08-05-2016, 12:14 PM   #8
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Pork chops

I often stuff them with dried apricots, seasoned with cinnamon, sear them, and finish in the oven


IMO the most common problem with pork chops is overcooking.
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Old 08-05-2016, 12:24 PM   #9
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...IMO the most common problem with pork chops is overcooking.


I agree. As with boneless skinless chicken breasts, super lean meats can dry out very quickly. So not over cooking is key. Brining gives you more of a margin for error.
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Old 01-10-2017, 08:48 PM   #10
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I hate to admit I'm not a fan of boneless chops, or really any chops but I'm cooking for others here. They like chops.

I think I've made the same mistake on my chicken breasts as I do on chops, I cook them until they 'look' good, but they get dry and over cooked. Now I often poach my chicken and measure the internal temperature to be sure it is done. Take it out and cool it immediately. I cut it up and add it to a casserole and it still stays nice and moist. It just isn't browned at all.

With chops, I want them to look a little browned on the outside. So first, tonight I'll brine them, then tomorrow, dry them well and get them to room temperature. Heat up the big double bottom pan with oil and butter, then quickly brown the outside of first side and measure the internal temp with a thermometer while browning the outside of the second side. Does that sound like a good plan?
I'll be serving them with sauerkraut and some leftovers (beans and spiced rice).

I need them to turn out 'delicious' because if they don't like them, then I'm stuck eating the chops and I'm not a fan of them.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:59 AM   #11
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Brined and grilled as Andy mentioned, or I really like breaded and baked like a Shake-n-Bake for thick boneless chops.
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Old 01-12-2017, 01:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I hate to admit I'm not a fan of boneless chops, or really any chops but I'm cooking for others here. They like chops.

I think I've made the same mistake on my chicken breasts as I do on chops, I cook them until they 'look' good, but they get dry and over cooked. Now I often poach my chicken and measure the internal temperature to be sure it is done. Take it out and cool it immediately. I cut it up and add it to a casserole and it still stays nice and moist. It just isn't browned at all.

With chops, I want them to look a little browned on the outside. So first, tonight I'll brine them, then tomorrow, dry them well and get them to room temperature. Heat up the big double bottom pan with oil and butter, then quickly brown the outside of first side and measure the internal temp with a thermometer while browning the outside of the second side. Does that sound like a good plan?
I'll be serving them with sauerkraut and some leftovers (beans and spiced rice).

I need them to turn out 'delicious' because if they don't like them, then I'm stuck eating the chops and I'm not a fan of them.
I agree with Bliss, I never buy boneless pork chops, and rarely buy any boneless pork cut. For pork roast, I usually cook bone in shoulder roasts. I will occasionally buy a boneless pork tenderloin roast to marinate and grill.

I prefer the way that bone in meats cook, that includes chicken. I don't buy boneless breasts, only split breasts with bone and skin attached. If I actually need boneless, it's a matter of a minute or less to "filet" one, and then I have more scraps to add to the bag that I keep in the freezer for making stock.

I do occasionally buy boneless thighs for sautéing or stir fry, because it's takes a technique I haven't perfected yet to bone thighs without making a mess of it.
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Old 01-12-2017, 02:17 PM   #13
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Well, these boneless chops turned out good. Browned a little on both sides. I added 2 cups of broth with garlic and thyme, let them swim on low for 15 minutes. Cooked up some kennebec potatoes, added a little sauerkraut and applesauce on the side. They turned out very good. I was even surprised that I liked them well enough.

For the guys 'dinners' they take to work, I put the potatoes on the bottom, some of the herbed broth, cubed up bite sized pieces of chops, made some room on the side of the container for the applesauce.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:45 AM   #14
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For thick chops, set up breading station. slit from chop sides to make a pocket. Fill with savory sage-bread dressing. Dip kn flour, -egg-wqsh, them seasoned bread crumbs. Fry for 5 minutes per side in hot oil,nd finish for 15 minutes in 375' oven. Make sure chops are on a rack with foil, or parchment paper underneath.

You can also fill the pocked with fruit, such as apple, pineapple, or cherries. Serve with appropriate sauce for filling.
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:21 AM   #15
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This is my mother's recipe for 4 pork chops. She always said "You will never get a dry pork chop" with this method:

Lightly brown the chops on both sides in a deep frying pan with 2 Tbs cooking oil. DO NOT OVERCOOK!

Remove chops from frying pan and drain off the oil and fat.

Put the chops back in the frying pan, add a large can of Campbell's pork & beans and one can of water.

Simmer until the sauce is even thicker than the original sauce, stirring occasionally so the beans don't stick to the bottom of the pan.

Serve with soft bread and good quality butter (to dip into the sauce), and your favorite green salad
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:46 AM   #16
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Quote:
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...add a large can of Campbell's pork & beans and one can of water.
Campbell's Pork & Beans have a unique flavor that no other beans can duplicate and it makes the whole dish!
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:49 AM   #17
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I cook pork chops the same as I cook steak. Boneless loin chops are among the leanest and best cuts of the pig. Similar to a top quality steak in beef.
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