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Old 09-05-2014, 11:09 PM   #1
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Filet de porc facile aux herbes de Provence à la Kayelle

This is the second time I've made this, so thought I'd post it so it doesn't get lost. Thanks for the inspiration Katie.

This is fabulous, easy, and just delicious.


1 pork tenderloin (they usually come two to the package)
4 0Z Grey Poupon Dijon mustard (half a jar)
5-6 Tbs Herbs de Provence, with or without lavender.
Salt to taste

Remove any silver skin from the tenderloin. Pound out the whole tenderloin so that it's approximately all the same thickness. Place on a small cookie sheet and lightly salt on both sides. With the back of a spoon, thickly frost the top with half the mustard and sprinkle on half of the Herbs de Provence. Flip the meat over on the pan, and do the same on the other side.
Set your oven rack closest to the flame of the broiler, and broil for 15 minutes without turning. Let it rest for about 10 minutes and transfer to a cutting board. Carefully slice 1/2 inch slices on the bias to keep the top crust intact.
This will serve two generously.
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:14 AM   #2
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looks good, k-l.

do you use smooth or wholegrain dijon?

i've made a similar dish using wholegrain dijon (maille brand) and i like to add a pinch of fennel seeds to the top.

delicious stuff.
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:17 AM   #3
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Isn't that an awful lot of mustard? I would be afraid it would overwhelm the flavour.
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Old 09-07-2014, 12:20 PM   #4
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Isn't that an awful lot of mustard? I would be afraid it would overwhelm the flavour.
I don't think so. I use Dijon on pork chops and it mellows as it cooks.
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Old 09-07-2014, 12:25 PM   #5
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I don't think so. I use Dijon on pork chops and it mellows as it cooks.
That's good to know. I guess I haven't cooked with Dijon. Around here it's used mostly for vinaigrette, but also as a condiment.
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Old 09-07-2014, 12:42 PM   #6
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Thanks, Kay. Sounds full of flavor, and I bet it has an awesome crust. Will try it.
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:56 PM   #7
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Thanks for the interest guys.

I know it sounds like a lot of mustard, but the thick creaminess of the Dijon, combined with the punch of flavor from the herbs blends beautifully to mellow out the sharpness of the mustard. I really don't think whole grain Dijon would work equally well.
Every once in a great while what I call a "stupidly simple" recipe turns into a masterpiece.

I'd be interested to hear what you would think of sides to go with it for company. It would be easy enough to do more than one for a party.
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Old 09-07-2014, 02:53 PM   #8
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That's good to know. I guess I haven't cooked with Dijon. Around here it's used mostly for vinaigrette, but also as a condiment.
I'm surprised, TL. When I lived in northern Germany (that was a century ago), we used to make a pork roast smeared with Dijon, rolled in seasoned flour, browned and then finished in the oven. It produced a crust as well. My aunt used to make orange roughie that was encrusted in Dijon.
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Old 09-07-2014, 03:40 PM   #9
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Thanks for the interest guys.

I know it sounds like a lot of mustard, but the thick creaminess of the Dijon, combined with the punch of flavor from the herbs blends beautifully to mellow out the sharpness of the mustard. I really don't think whole grain Dijon would work equally well.
Every once in a great while what I call a "stupidly simple" recipe turns into a masterpiece.

I'd be interested to hear what you would think of sides to go with it for company. It would be easy enough to do more than one for a party.
My first thought would be to roast some asparagus to go alongside. Since you've got a little resting time for the tenderloin and the oven is already hot, you could put your prepped asparagus on a baking sheet and just pop it in the oven right when you take the tenderloin out. I'd lower the temp from broil to 425 though. Should be about perfect timing, once you've let the meat rest and have sliced it.

Maybe some garlic mashed potatoes, too? You could make those before you roast the pork, then just reheat at the last minute if you need to. I'm making myself hungry now.
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Old 09-07-2014, 04:45 PM   #10
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I think the lean pork cries out for something like au gratin potatoes. Roasted asparagus would be great, drizzled with balsamic vinegar as they come out of the oven. Or sautéed apples and onions.
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:19 PM   #11
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Actually, I did roasted asparagus both times I made it before. It worked out great to have the olive oiled and seasoned asparagus on another cookie sheet on the shelf under the pork for only 10 minutes. I like both your potato ideas. My rice pilaf worked well too.
I'm thinking twice baked loaded potatoes would also be a good choice for company. Apple and onions
Hmmmm...
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:36 PM   #12
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Here's another veg option, since pork goes so well with fruit: Roasted or sautéed green beans with cherry sauce. I made a cherry sauce for Thanksgiving last year and we loved it: Turkey Sauté with Fresh Cherry Sauce Recipe | Epicurious.com
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:36 PM   #13
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We used to do boiled potatoes tossed with butter and parsley (there's a name for these, but the name escapes me at the moment and the potatoes were the yellow potatoes that one finds in Germany), sauerkraut (usually the red sauerkraut), and apple slices cooked in beer. This was what we'd make on Sundays.
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:38 PM   #14
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CWS - parslied potatoes?
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Old 09-07-2014, 05:43 PM   #15
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I have never, ever considered apples and onions sauteed together, but that sounds wonderful. What fat do you saute them in? Any seasoning?
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Old 09-07-2014, 06:01 PM   #16
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I found it in the Cooks' Illustrated Best International Recipe cookbook in the German section. Saute the onions in butter, with a little salt and thyme, till softened and starting to brown, then add apple slices. Deglaze with a little apple cider if necessary and continue to saute, or cover and cook on low heat, till everything is tender, stirring occasionally. Good stuff
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Old 09-07-2014, 06:03 PM   #17
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CWS - parslied potatoes?
The German word for the dish is Petersilienkartoffeln, which does translate to parsley potatoes, but there is another word / term that my friend's mom called them in English and that is what escapes me...hmmm...time to send her an email and ask what her mom called them in English. I wish I could find the potatoes that are used in northern Germany...they are similar to a red potato texture wise, but they have a different taste and have a yellow flesh.
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Old 09-07-2014, 06:25 PM   #18
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I found it in the Cooks' Illustrated Best International Recipe cookbook in the German section. Saute the onions in butter, with a little salt and thyme, till softened and starting to brown, then add apple slices. Deglaze with a little apple cider if necessary and continue to saute, or cover and cook on low heat, till everything is tender, stirring occasionally. Good stuff
Thank you! Sounds great!
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:19 PM   #19
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Thank you! Sounds great!
We used to add apples, onions, and raisins to the beer gravy when we made liver in Germany (dredge the liver in seasoned flour, brown it, add the onions, raisins, apples cook those until onions are limp, pour in a bottle of beer [or use cider], cover and simmer about 10 minutes. Makes great gravy). I make a German pork roast with apples, onions, potatoes, raisins and either beer or apple cider in my Roemertopf.

Modern Romertopf
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:22 PM   #20
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Actually, I did roasted asparagus both times I made it before. It worked out great to have the olive oiled and seasoned asparagus on another cookie sheet on the shelf under the pork for only 10 minutes. I like both your potato ideas. My rice pilaf worked well too.
I'm thinking twice baked loaded potatoes would also be a good choice for company. Apple and onions
Hmmmm...

How about some potatoes anna with onions and some applesauce on the side? Though....color is missing with my suggestion.
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