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Old 06-11-2008, 07:16 AM   #1
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Final pork loin question before big day

I'm buying a 4 lb pork loin for 6 adults. The one that is already brined and the boneless one. I'm also searing it on the stove before putting it in the oven at 375.

I want to try to time when it will be done and I'm getting conflicting results.

Most sources say 20 minutes per pound.

However, I'm finding recipe examples like this.

3lb -----hour and 20 minutes at 350

2lb -----2 hours at 350

That most certainly doesn't add up to 20 minutes per pound.

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Old 06-11-2008, 07:23 AM   #2
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If you spend 10-12 minutes searing the loin, it should cook in about an hour. Final doneness decision should be based on temperature with the time as a guide.
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Old 06-11-2008, 07:44 AM   #3
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OK - I have to ask - is it the skinny pork tenderloin or a larger pork roast/loin.

The reason I'm asking is because once you sear the skinny one it's almost done - wont' take long in the oven at all. I normally just cook mine totally on the grill for maybe 20 -25 minutes while rotating on all sides. Best way stove top I have found is steaming in one of those Chinese bamboo steamers - works like a dream in about 30 minutes!

If it's the larger one I have a different school of thought on that one. Once seared (I mean really hot pan and really seared on all sides) I pop it into a 500° oven until internal temp reaches 140º. Tent and let rest for 10 minutes at the very least. This leaves the inside slightly pink and juicy.

My pork roast has cooked before in as little as 25 minutes after a healthy sear.
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:21 AM   #4
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hmm not sure, I'm getting it at Hannaford.
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:24 AM   #5
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I'm pretty sure it's a loin if it weighs four pounds. Tenderloins run around a pound to a pound and a quarter.
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:49 AM   #6
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I'm pretty sure it's a loin if it weighs four pounds. Tenderloins run around a pound to a pound and a quarter.
I'm thinking the same thing Andy....Pork Loin....Not Pork tenderloin.

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If it's the larger one I have a different school of thought on that one. Once seared (I mean really hot pan and really seared on all sides) I pop it into a 500° oven until internal temp reaches 140º. Tent and let rest for 10 minutes at the very least. This leaves the inside slightly pink and juicy
.


The only way you are going to know when it reaches 140* is with a thermometer probed into the thickest part...A Clock want tell you this.


Enjoy!
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Old 06-11-2008, 10:26 AM   #7
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Thanks Andy - I never really looked at the weight of the tenderloins but that does make sense.
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Old 06-12-2008, 05:30 PM   #8
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I'm thinking the same thing Andy....Pork Loin....Not Pork tenderloin.

So Miss Legend...Follow Miss KE Method

.


The only way you are going to know when it reaches 140* is with a thermometer probed into the thickest part...A Clock want tell you this.


Enjoy!
I go past 140... 155 or so... Always turns out perfect..

At that point, no pink but still really nice and moist.--this is for a loin, not a tenderloin.... big difference.

I also don't sear it in a pan. I start it really hot--450 for 30 minutes then back down to 270...
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Old 06-12-2008, 05:42 PM   #9
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If you really want perfect meat, forget about timing it; you can time it when you've cooked off dozens of loins and can temp your meat by touch. Until then, if you want perfect meat, you need a thermometer,simple as that. Make sure to get a good quality digital, whether instant read or not is up to you, but for roasts like that I prefer to use my 2-piece thermometer, the probe stays in the meat throughout cooking (so you don't always have to open the door to check temps and lose heat), and is attached to a small heat resistant cable that plugs into the display unit, which usually also has a timer, and a magnet so you can stick it to your stove/oven. Set your timer/thermometer to buzz at your desired temp, then pull your meat and let it rest until serving.

Also, for pork loin, I prefer to go low heat- 210 degrees or so. Cooking at 375 makes it harder to temp/time because the less dense portion of the loin will cook faster.
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Old 06-12-2008, 08:23 PM   #10
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If you spend 10-12 minutes searing the loin, it should cook in about an hour. Final doneness decision should be based on temperature with the time as a guide.
I'm seriously thinking about cooking it at 350 instead of 375. not sure if that will make that big of a difference. With the searing, do you think an average time frame might be more like an hour and a half instead of an hour? I know it's just an estimate.
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Old 06-12-2008, 08:25 PM   #11
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I would expect it to take more than an hour. I do mine at 400F.
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Old 06-12-2008, 08:43 PM   #12
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I don't sear mine. I rub it with a package of dry onion soup mix, then put it, uncovered, in a 350 oven for about 45 minutes. Then we cover it with foil and continue cooking to a temp of 140. After that, we let it stand for 10 minutes.
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Old 06-14-2008, 12:16 PM   #13
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So Legend, what was the final outcome.
How did you wind up cooking your porkloin and what were the results?
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:08 PM   #14
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I'm doing it tomorrow for fathers day. I got a center cut pork loin that's a little over 4lbs. The directions on the package say 25-30 minutes per pound in a 325 degree oven. Should I just make sure I follow these instructions that the sticker says. I had to get it from the butcher section as the ones on the shelves were only 2 pounders.

My plan was to sear it first and than do 375 degrees until done to probably 155 to be safe and than let it sit.

The other thing I'm rethinking is the butcher says that you wouldn't recommend searing it on the stove first. said he didn't think it would make much of a difference.
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:18 PM   #15
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I wrote this on another post, but thought I'd mention it here. I'd also like to do the following as I have done this with smaller roasts and it really comes out very good.

Layer your finely diced carrot, onion and celery in the bottom of a small roasting tray and put the bay leaf on top. These vegetables will soften and get lightly browned during roasting, which will give some depth to the gravy you’ll make with them at the end.
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Old 06-14-2008, 08:19 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018 View Post
I'm doing it tomorrow for fathers day. I got a center cut pork loin that's a little over 4lbs. The directions on the package say 25-30 minutes per pound in a 325 degree oven. Should I just make sure I follow these instructions that the sticker says.
You can use that as a guide, but you should still check it with a thermometer.

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My plan was to sear it first and than do 375 degrees until done to probably 155 to be safe and than let it sit.

The other thing I'm rethinking is the butcher says that you wouldn't recommend searing it on the stove first. said he didn't think it would make much of a difference.
He's wrong Searing it creates a wonderful, flavorful browned crust on the outside, as well as leaving fond on the pan that you can use to make a pan sauce for the meat, if you want.

I've made a pork loin with a Cook's Illustrated recipe a few times - seared in a stainless steel pan, then roasted at 325 degrees in the same pan till the thermometer indicates 135 degrees; tent with foil and let rest till temp comes up to 150 degrees. HTH.
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Old 06-14-2008, 09:33 PM   #17
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legend, there are lots of ways to make this a tasty roast. If you want to sear it, then do so. But you don't have to.

If you want to cook it at 400 or 325 or another temperature, go for it. You can cook the roast properly at more than one temperature.

Don't stress out, do what you are comfortable with and enjoy the day.
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Old 06-15-2008, 01:59 PM   #18
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He's wrong Searing it creates a wonderful, flavorful browned crust on the outside, as well as leaving fond on the pan that you can use to make a pan sauce for the meat, if you want.
+1

There's a reason for that thing called the "Maillard Reaction". Purveyors don't always have the best information in regards to cooking their own product sometimes.
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Old 06-15-2008, 05:09 PM   #19
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I gave it a good searing and than popped it into the oven at 375 degrees until the temperature reached 155 and than I let it sit while I warmed up the homemade mashed potatoes and acorn squash/spinache/cheese mixture plus made the gravy. 3 cups of broth (including juices from pan), 4 tablespoons of butter and 4 tablespoons of flour did the trick for the gravy. The pork roast was very juicy and very yummy. Plus we had rolls and nana made the deserts.
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Old 06-15-2008, 10:31 PM   #20
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Sounds great, Legend. I may have to put this on my menu soon.
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