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Old 12-05-2014, 10:26 AM   #1
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How do you cook your pork chops?

I have some bone in center cut pork chops that I want to prepare for tonight's dinner. How do you cook chops so that they are fully cooked, yet not dry. Any tips will be appreciated.

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Old 12-05-2014, 10:42 AM   #2
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That's a good cut of meat but lean so it can dry out if over cooked.

When I cook pork chops, I brine them first.

Dissolve 1/4 cup of salt and 2 tb of sugar (or brown sugar) in a quart of water. place the chops in the brine and refrigerate for a couple of hours. Rinse, dry and cook.

Lean cuts like these chops need fast, high heat cooking. Grilling, broiling or pan frying.

Pork is done when the internal temperature reaches 145ºF. Cooking them more than that will result in dried out pork. The brining helps slow down the drying out process but not for long.
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:47 AM   #3
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I've had a problem with chops being too dry and tasteless.

My solution was to simmer them in a pan of gravy, low and slow, turning the chops every 15 minutes for about an hour.

The chops are tender and delicious and the gravy is awesome.
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:56 AM   #4
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Pork chops should not be over cooked, unless it is your intention to cook them for a very long time. Pork is as safe as beef today and can be cooked medium, as it should be.

Your pork chops can be seasoned and fried in olive oil for just a few minutes per side depending on thickness.
Do not over cook. Allow the chops to rest as you would a steak. You could saute some onions and peppers in the same pan to top them with.
You can also make a quick sauce while they sit.
They will be tender and juicy if you do not over cook them and allow them to rest for a little bit before serving.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:23 AM   #5
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I fry them quick or bake them in the oven.

If I bake them I usually coat them with oil or prepared mustard and dip them into a coating made using equal parts of breadcrumbs and grated Romano cheese with a few shakes of whatever herbs and spices sound good. Things like onion powder, poultry seasoning, garlic powder, cayenne pepper etc... Then I put them on a greased cookie sheet and bake them in a 425 degree oven for 30 to 35 minutes, depending on the thickness of the chops

You could also make up some bread stuffing, brown the chops on both sides, put them on a baking sheet and top with a scoop of stuffing, bake in a hot oven until the stuffing is heated through and the chops are done.

Similar to Z's method, brown the chops and simmer in barbeque sauce, serve over rice.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:27 AM   #6
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Thanks everyone.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:30 AM   #7
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Brine them, then sear and blast in hot oven.

DONT OVERCOOK!
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:38 AM   #8
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I like to brown chops, then simmer covered in either gravy (any kind, even mushroom soup) and onions, or sauerkraut (either Bavarian sweet or sour) with onions and maybe apples, until tender.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:42 AM   #9
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Pork chops are even a greater problem for home cooks than beef steaks. Both must be bought very thick, a inch of more. Home cook tops just can't provide enough heat to brown them without overcooking the inside.

Pork chops are worse. They are leaner. They overcook just as readily, but they get very dry when it happens. So I like to sear them in a very hot pan and then bring the temperature down low and add liquid, effectively braising them.

And, because it's a more sensitive meat, temperature has to be monitored internally. The old 160-degree rule for pork is doubly silly. It never had to be that high, even when parasites were a risk. Far lower temperatures killed them. And it produced multiple generations who never experienced pork cooked medium or less. 140F is about the maximum to let it go to, and it's worth experimenting with lower temperatures, to see how you really like your pork. Pink is just fine. Rare white meat is not going to be popular with many people.

I think it's worth adding for people who really, really like pork, that it maybe possible to find local pork that, because of how they are raised or because of their strain are marbled more like beef.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:59 AM   #10
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I like to do my them hot and fast, preferably over a charcoal grill.
My wife likes to simmer them in a pan with sauce but they frequently turn out dry....
She thinks my chops are too "rare" for her for taste so I usually have to destroy her's on the grill as i do with her beef steaks.
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:01 PM   #11
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I still have many bad childhood memories of my mother's shoe leather pork chops. We always kept serrated knives on hand for just those occasions.

In the past few years, I've started to enjoy pork again, in part because of the lower cooking temperature recommendations. But I'm very picky about the cuts I buy. Most of the chops I've bought in grocery stores - even the higher end co-ops - are super lean with one big strip of fat that runs along the outer edge. Like GLC mentions, I would love to find some cuts with fat marbling within the meat.

Unfortunately, the local so-called pasture-raised product doesn't seem to cut it, either. I may have to look outside the area.
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:14 PM   #12
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I always brine my chops and this is my favorite way to cook them. No need to go out in the snow, as they can be done on a stove top grill...

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ops-88487.html
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:20 PM   #13
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Brown them on both sides in a frying pan, add a can of Bush's beans and a can of water, and allow it to simmer until the sauce thickens to your taste. My mother always said, "You can't make a dry pork chop this way."
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:15 PM   #14
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Shake 'N Bake !
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:21 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I still have many bad childhood memories of my mother's shoe leather pork chops. We always kept serrated knives on hand for just those occasions.

In the past few years, I've started to enjoy pork again, in part because of the lower cooking temperature recommendations. But I'm very picky about the cuts I buy. Most of the chops I've bought in grocery stores - even the higher end co-ops - are super lean with one big strip of fat that runs along the outer edge. Like GLC mentions, I would love to find some cuts with fat marbling within the meat.

Unfortunately, the local so-called pasture-raised product doesn't seem to cut it, either. I may have to look outside the area.
I just bought a pork shoulder roast so I could use half for posole and half for braised pork chops. There will be lots of marbling within the meat, but of course, since it's a tough cut, it will have to be simmered in liquid. I'm planning on chops braised in onion gravy for tonight and pork alla pizzaiola for another time.
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:23 PM   #16
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My mom used to make a casserole of pork chops, frozen lima beans, rice and canned soup. I think cream of celery? I adored this as a kid... has anyone had anything like this?
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:32 PM   #17
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i got a frying pat very hot with olive oil and butter, Seared the chops on both sides (3 min. per side) then in a 375 deg. oven for 10 mins. Turned out great!
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Old 12-06-2014, 01:38 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I just bought a pork shoulder roast so I could use half for posole and half for braised pork chops. There will be lots of marbling within the meat, but of course, since it's a tough cut, it will have to be simmered in liquid. I'm planning on chops braised in onion gravy for tonight and pork alla pizzaiola for another time.
That sounds great!

I like pork shoulder, as well as blade steak, which comes from the same part of the animal. My favorite recipe for those cuts is cochinita pibil, which is, for all intents and purposes, just a Mexican version of pulled pork.
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Old 12-06-2014, 06:35 AM   #19
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When I can get really thick ones, I'll brine them, then cut a nice pocket in them. I'll make a stuffing, usually including apples and bake them, using extra stuffing as dressing. Served with rotkohl.
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Old 12-06-2014, 07:23 AM   #20
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I love the flavor of pork. As has been stated by everyone who has responded, lean pork is very easy to overcook, resulting in dry, tough meat. But there are several ways to prevent this. Here are a few tips.

1. In the future, purchase pork steaks, as they have better fat marbling and are more tender than are the chops.

2. Pan-Frying - This can be done successfully by several techniques
a. Sear in a hot pan for about 4 minutes per side, or until juices just
turn clear as they ooze out the top. Remove from the pan to a
serving plate and allow to rest 5 minutes before serving.
b. Pan sear in hot pan for 1 minute per side, then turn the heat to
medium, and add a tbs. or 3 of your favorite wine, or broth. Cover
and simmer for about 5 more minutes. Remove and serve.
c. Dip in egg-wash, then flour, and fry in a half inch of cooking oil over
medium heat until the coating is well browned. Remove from the pan
and serve.
d. Sear un a hot pan for about two minutes per side, then add your
favorite gravy, or sauce, or creamy soup. Cover and simmer for 15
minutes more.

3. Braising - Season, then sear the chops on both sides to a light brown.
Add broth or soup, cover, and place into the oven at 325' F. Braise for
30 minutes.

4. It was mentioned before, and seems like cheating. But Shake & Bake
for pork produces juicy and flavorful pork chops.

5. Grill - I do mine on a Webber Kettle, over a direct bed of hot charcoal.
Simply season the chops (salt, pepper, sage, thyme, etc.) and place
directly over the fire. Cover and close all vents to half open position.
Grill about 5 mintues per side. You'll know the chops are done when
juices begin to run clear on top. REmove to platter and let rest for 5
minutes before serving.

6. Velvet - cut chops into thin strips. Create a marinade of soy sauce, vinegar, onion, garlic, brown sugar, and cornstarch. Play with the amounts of each until it tastes good to you. Place the pork strips into the marinade and let it hang out in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Heat oil to 320' F. Place the strips into the hot oil and poach them until the cornstarch coating turns opaque. Remove to drain on paper towels. Serve with rice, and stir-fried veggies. These pork strips can be coated with sauces such as sweet & sour, teriyaki, peanut, maple glaze, etc.

7. Tempura Pork - Cut pork into 1/2" cubes. Lightly season with salt and 5-spice powder. In a large bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup cornstarch, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 2 tsp. double acting baking powder. Add 1 cup water and stir to a smooth batter. Place pork cubes into the batter. Drop coated pieces into hot oil and fry until golden brown. serve with your favorite sauce.

All of these will give you tender and juicy pork. Hope one of these will help.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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